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Attitudes toward standardized assessment tools and their use among clinicians in a public mental health service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310267
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Oct; 73(7):387-396
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Jon Fauskanger Bjaastad
Amanda Jensen-Doss
Christian Moltu
Petter Jakobsen
Heine Hagenberg
Inge Joa
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Stavanger University Hospital , Stavanger , Norway.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2019 Oct; 73(7):387-396
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - standards
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - standards
Norway - epidemiology
Physicians - psychology - standards
Psychometrics
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the use and attitudes toward standardized assessment tools among clinicians in a public mental health service in Norway. A total of 606 clinicians provided feedback on their use and attitudes regarding psychometric qualities of such tools, their practicality, and their benefit over clinical judgment alone using the Attitudes toward Standardized Assessment (ASA) Scales. Clinicians working in the adult mental health field scored significantly higher on use of diagnostic interviews, pre-post evaluations, and ongoing evaluations, whereas clinicians working in the child/adolescent mental health field scored significantly higher on use of screening instruments and held more positive attitudes towards using standardized assessment tools. Attitudes toward standardized assessment tools predicted use of such tools, and results were found to be similar to a study on US clinicians. Whereas the US study only found attitudes regarding the practicality of using such instrument as an independent predictor of assessment use, the current study found that attitudes regarding psychometric qualities of such tools, their practicality, and their benefit over clinical judgment alone were independent predictors of use.
PubMed ID
31322010 View in PubMed
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Commitment under pressure: experienced therapists' inner work during difficult therapeutic impasses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145884
Source
Psychother Res. 2010 May;20(3):309-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Christian Moltu
Per-Einar Binder
Geir Høstmark Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Helse Forde Psychiatric Clinic, Forde, Norway. christian.moltu@helse-forde.no
Source
Psychother Res. 2010 May;20(3):309-20
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Anger
Career Choice
Countertransference (Psychology)
Emotions
Female
Humans
Individuality
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - therapy
Motivation
Norway
Personality Development
Personality Disorders - psychology - therapy
Problem Solving
Professional Competence
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotherapy
Retrospective Studies
Self Concept
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Interviews were conducted to explore the recall of impasse experiences of 12 highly skilled and experienced therapists. Participants were interviewed in depth individually about a specific impasse from their experience that resolved successfully. The transcribed interviews were analysed using qualitative methodology. The authors found that participants understood their reported impasse experiences as important for their professional development. The category of "helpful subjective presence" describes the mode of being with patients that the participants found therapeutic. The categories of "losing hope" and "difficult feelings in the therapist in the here and now" are processes that threaten the helpful presence. The participants' inner work on the two latter categories is identified as a key to the successful resolution of impasses.
PubMed ID
20099206 View in PubMed
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Facing the fear of failure: An explorative qualitative study of client experiences in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for university students with academic evaluation anxiety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271479
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015;10:27990
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Aslak Hjeltnes
Per-Einar Binder
Christian Moltu
Ingrid Dundas
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015;10:27990
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Mindfulness
Norway
Qualitative Research
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological - therapy
Students - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Test Anxiety Scale
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the subjective experiences of 29 university students who participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program for academic evaluation anxiety. Participants who self-referred to the Student Counseling Service underwent individual semi-structured interviews about how they experienced the personal relevance and practical usefulness of taking the MBSR program. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a team-based explorative-reflective thematic approach based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological epistemology. Five salient patterns of meaning (themes) were found: (1) finding an inner source of calm, (2) sharing a human struggle, (3) staying focused in learning situations, (4) moving from fear to curiosity in academic learning, and (5) feeling more self-acceptance when facing difficult situations. We contextualize these findings in relation to existing research, discuss our own process of reflexivity, highlight important limitations of this study, and suggest possible implications for future research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26297629 View in PubMed
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Negotiating the coresearcher mandate - service users' experiences of doing collaborative research on mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125367
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(19):1608-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Christian Moltu
Jon Stefansen
Marit Svisdahl
Marius Veseth
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, District General Hospital of Førde, Førde, Norway. christian.moltu@helse-forde.no
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(19):1608-16
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Focus Groups
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Mental health
Mental Health Services - utilization
Negotiating
Norway
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Patients - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
Traditionally, the voices of service users have been silent in research into mental health issues. A Norwegian research network, however, recognizes the importance of involving service users as coresearchers and initiated a training program in research methodology and design intended to empower them as active participants in research projects. In this article, we explore how these coresearchers with a mental health service user background experience their participation in projects as well as in attending the training: What is it like being a service user coresearcher in collaborative studies on issues in mental health? How do coresearchers negotiate their roles and mandate?
We used focus groups as our data collection method, transcribed the group discussions verbatim, and analyzed the transcriptions using qualitative methodology. We then took the preliminary analyses back to the participants for discussion, auditing, and reanalysis.
We identified themes that represent important social processes around which the participants developed a consensual understanding: self-definition, constructive differentiation and negotiations.
Our findings generate hypotheses on how participatory research into mental health issues can be fruitfully organized, in a way that empowers service users to active and constructive participation.
PubMed ID
22489612 View in PubMed
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Re-embodying eating: patients' experiences 5 years after bariatric surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276440
Source
Qual Health Res. 2014 Dec;24(12):1700-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Eli Natvik
Eva Gjengedal
Christian Moltu
Målfrid Råheim
Source
Qual Health Res. 2014 Dec;24(12):1700-10
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - psychology
Eating - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Social Adjustment
Abstract
Health experts advise and expect patients to eat healthily after bariatric surgery. For patients, difficulties with eating might have been a long-standing, problematic part of life-a part that is not necessarily healed by surgery. Empirical research on patients' experiences of eating practices after bariatric surgery is lacking. Aiming to contribute to the development of clinical practice, we explored meanings attached to eating in the long term and sought descriptions of change and bodily sensations. We interviewed 14 patients at least 5 years after bariatric surgery. The surgical restriction forced changes in the way patients sensed their own body in eating, but the uncertainty related to maintaining weight loss in the long term remained. Meanings attached to eating transcended food as choices situated in a nourishment and health perspective, and were not necessarily changed. Eating was an existential and embodied practice, which remained an ambiguous and sensitive matter after surgery.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25156217 View in PubMed
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Translating weight loss into agency: Men's experiences 5 years after bariatric surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271522
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015;10:27729
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Eli Natvik
Eva Gjengedal
Christian Moltu
Målfrid Råheim
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015;10:27729
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - psychology
Body Image - psychology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Obesity, Morbid - surgery
Quality of Life - psychology
Self Concept
Weight Loss
Abstract
Fewer men than women with severe obesity undergo bariatric surgery for weight loss, and knowledge about men's situation after surgery, beyond medical status, is lacking. Our aim was to explore men's experiences with life after bariatric surgery from a long-term perspective. We conducted in-depth interviews with 13 men, aged 28-60 years, between 5 and 7 years after surgery. The analysis was inspired by Giorgi's phenomenological method. We found that agency was pivotal for how the men understood themselves and their lives after surgery. Weight loss meant regaining opportunities for living and acting in unrestricted and independent daily lives, yet surgery remained a radical treatment with complex consequences. Turning to surgery had involved conceptualizing their own body size as illness, which the men had resisted doing for years. After surgery, the rapid and major weight loss and the feelings of being exhausted, weak, and helpless were intertwined. The profound intensity of the weight loss process took the men by surprise. Embodying weight loss and change involved an inevitable renegotiating of experiences connected to the large body. Having bariatric surgery was a long-term process that seemed unfinished 5 years after surgery. Restrictions and insecurity connected to health and illness persist, despite successful weight loss and embodied change. Bariatric surgery initiated a complex and long-lasting life-changing process, involving both increased capacity for agency and illness-like experiences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26066518 View in PubMed
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What Brings You Here? Exploring Why Young Adults Seek Help for Social Anxiety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290914
Source
Qual Health Res. 2016 Oct; 26(12):1705-20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Aslak Hjeltnes
Christian Moltu
Elisabeth Schanche
Per-Einar Binder
Author Affiliation
University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Aslak.Hjeltnes@uib.no.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2016 Oct; 26(12):1705-20
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety
Emotions
Fear
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Phobia, Social - therapy
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
Social anxiety disorder typically manifests in young adulthood, but there is an absence of qualitative research on the actual experiences of young adults suffering with this disorder. The aim of the present study was to investigate the lived experiences of 29 Norwegian university students who were seeking professional help for symptoms of social anxiety. We conducted in-depth interviews prior to a clinical trial. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a team-based thematic analysis method based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological epistemology. We identified five themes: (a) from being shy to interpreting anxiety as a mental health problem, (b) experiencing emotions as threatening and uncontrollable, (c) encountering loneliness as relationships fall away, (d) hiding the vulnerable self from others, and (e) deciding to face social fears in the future. We relate our findings to existing theory and research, discuss our process of reflexivity, highlight study limitations, and suggest implications for future research.
PubMed ID
26193889 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.