Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Components of metabolic syndrome predicting diabetes: no role of inflammation or dyslipidemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162424
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1875-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Margareta Norberg
Hans Stenlund
Bernt Lindahl
Christer Andersson
Lars Weinehall
Gãran Hallmans
Jan W Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences Section, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University Hospital, Building 9B, SE-901 85 Umea, Sweden. margareta.norberg@epiph.umu.se
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1875-85
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Dyslipidemias - physiopathology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammation - physiopathology
Leptin - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Proinsulin - blood
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The diagnostic criteria and the clinical usefulness of the metabolic syndrome (MetSy) are currently questioned. The objective was to describe the structure of MetSy and to evaluate its components for prediction of diabetes type 2 (T2DM).
This was a case-referent study nested within a population-based health survey. Among 33,336 participants, we identified 177 initially non-diabetic individuals who developed T2DM after 0.1 to 10.5 years (mean, 5.4 years), and, for each diabetes case, two referents matched for sex, age, and year of health survey. Baseline variables included oral glucose tolerance test, BMI, blood pressure, blood lipids, adipokines, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance, and beta-cell function. Exploratory and confirmative factor analyses were applied to hypothesize the structure of the MetSy. The prediction of T2DM by the different factors was evaluated by multivariate logistic regression analysis.
A hypothetical five-factor model of intercorrelated composite factors was generated. The inflammation, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure factors were predicitive only in univariate analysis. In multivariable analyses, two factors independently and significantly predicted T2DM: an obesity/insulin resistance factor and a glycemia factor. The composite factors did not improve the prediction of T2DM compared with single variables. Among the original variables, fasting glucose, proinsulin, BMI, and blood pressure values were predictive of T2DM.
Our data support the concept of a MetSy, and we propose five separate clusters of components. The inflammation and dyslipidemia factors were not independently associated with diabetes risk. In contrast, obesity and accompanying insulin resistance and beta-cell decompensation seem to be two core perturbations promoting and predicting progression to T2DM.
PubMed ID
17636107 View in PubMed
Less detail

Learning From Incident Reporting? Analysis of Incidents Resulting in Patient Injuries in a Web-Based System in Swedish Health Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309781
Source
J Patient Saf. 2020 12; 16(4):264-268
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2020
Author
Eva-Lena Ahlberg
Johan Elfström
Madeleine Risberg Borgstedt
Annica Öhrn
Christer Andersson
Rune Sjödahl
Per Nilsen
Author Affiliation
From the Center for Healthcare Development, County Council of Östergötland.
Source
J Patient Saf. 2020 12; 16(4):264-268
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Humans
Learning Health System - methods
Patient Safety - standards
Risk Management - methods
Sweden
Abstract
Incident reporting (IR) systems have the potential to improve patient safety if they enable learning from the reported risks and incidents. The aim of this study was to investigate incidents registered in an IR system in a Swedish county council.
The study was conducted in the County Council of Östergötland, Sweden. Data were retrieved from the IR system, which included 4755 incidents occurring in somatic care that resulted in patient injuries from 2004 to 2012. One hundred correctly classified patient injuries were randomly sampled from 3 injury severity levels: injuries leading to deaths, permanent harm, and temporary harm. Three aspects were analyzed: handling of the incident, causes of the incident, and actions taken to prevent its recurrence.
Of the 300 injuries, 79% were handled in the departments where they occurred. The department head decided what actions should be taken to prevent recurrence in response to 95% of the injuries. A total of 448 causes were identified for the injuries; problems associated with procedures, routines, and guidelines were most common. Decisions taken for 80% of the injuries could be classified using the IR system documentation and root cause analysis. The most commonly pursued type of action was change of work routine or guideline.
The handling, causes, and actions taken to prevent recurrence were similar for injuries of different severity levels. Various forms of feedback (information, education, and dialogue) were an integral aspect of the IR system. However, this feedback was primarily intradepartmental and did not yield much organizational learning.
PubMed ID
29112034 View in PubMed
Less detail

[New policy for police assistance in the county of Västra Götaland. Mentally ill might not receive care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107758
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Jul 17-Aug 6;110(29-31):1329
Publication Type
Article
Author
Christer Andersson
Author Affiliation
Christer.andersson@notkarnan.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2013 Jul 17-Aug 6;110(29-31):1329
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commitment of Mentally Ill - standards
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Police - standards
Sweden
Transportation of Patients - standards
PubMed ID
23980440 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vitamin D is associated with lower limb muscle strength and grip strength in Middle Eastern- and African-born immigrants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296065
Source
Nutr Res. 2018 Nov; 59:29-35
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Lena Granlund
Margareta Norberg
Anna Ramnemark
Christer Andersson
Marie Lindkvist
Eva Fhärm
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: lena.granlund@vll.se.
Source
Nutr Res. 2018 Nov; 59:29-35
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
There is increasing evidence that vitamin D status is associated with muscle function. Vitamin D deficiency is common in immigrants. We hypothesized that there was a positive association between vitamin D status and muscle strength in immigrants. The aim of this study was to examine associations between vitamin D status and muscle strength in an immigrant population in Sweden. All immigrants aged 25-65 years, born in 9 African or Middle East countries, and living in a district in Umeå (n = 1306) were invited. A total of 111 men and 105 women (16.5%) completed the study. Lower limb muscle strength was examined using a standardized muscle function indices of muscle strength. Grip strength was examined using a JAMAR hand dynamometer. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The analyses were adjusted for sex, age, height, body mass index, years since immigration, 25(OH)D, vitamin D deficiency, physical activity, and medical and socioeconomic factors. Twelve percent of the immigrants had vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D levels
PubMed ID
30442230 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vitamin D is associated with lower limb muscle strength and grip strength in Middle Eastern- and African-born immigrants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300321
Source
Nutr Res. 2018 11; 59:29-35
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2018
Author
Lena Granlund
Margareta Norberg
Anna Ramnemark
Christer Andersson
Marie Lindkvist
Eva Fhärm
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: lena.granlund@vll.se.
Source
Nutr Res. 2018 11; 59:29-35
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Hand
Hand Strength
Humans
Lower Extremity
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Muscle strength
Sweden
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - complications
Abstract
There is increasing evidence that vitamin D status is associated with muscle function. Vitamin D deficiency is common in immigrants. We hypothesized that there was a positive association between vitamin D status and muscle strength in immigrants. The aim of this study was to examine associations between vitamin D status and muscle strength in an immigrant population in Sweden. All immigrants aged 25-65 years, born in 9 African or Middle East countries, and living in a district in Umeå (n = 1306) were invited. A total of 111 men and 105 women (16.5%) completed the study. Lower limb muscle strength was examined using a standardized muscle function indices of muscle strength. Grip strength was examined using a JAMAR hand dynamometer. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The analyses were adjusted for sex, age, height, body mass index, years since immigration, 25(OH)D, vitamin D deficiency, physical activity, and medical and socioeconomic factors. Twelve percent of the immigrants had vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D levels
PubMed ID
30442230 View in PubMed
Less detail

Vitamin D status was not associated with anxiety, depression, or health-related quality of life in Middle Eastern and African-born immigrants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306725
Source
Nutr Res. 2020 03; 75:109-118
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2020
Author
Lena E Granlund
Anna K Ramnemark
Christer Andersson
Marie C Lindkvist
Margareta Norberg
Eva M Fhärm
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, SE-90187 Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: lena.granlund@regionvasterbotten.se.
Source
Nutr Res. 2020 03; 75:109-118
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Active vitamin D is a neurosteroid that may modulate brain function. Associations between vitamin D deficiency and depression and anxiety have been demonstrated. We hypothesized that there was an association between anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and vitamin D status. To test this hypothesis, we examined the association between anxiety, depression, and HRQOL and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations in the Middle Eastern and African-born immigrant population. All immigrants aged 25-65?years, born in 9 African or Middle Eastern countries, and living in 3 districts in Umeå (n?=?1306) were invited, with 195 English- or Swedish-speaking immigrants (104 men and 91 women) participated. Anxiety and depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. HRQOL was measured using EuroQoL-5 Dimension 3 Level Questionnaire and EuroQoL Visual Analogue Scale. Serum 25(OH)D was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Associations were determined using logistic and linear regression. Analyses were adjusted for sex, age, origin, socioeconomic factors, lifestyle, chronic diseases, and obesity. In total, 71% had 25(OH)D less than 50?nmol/L and 11% had 25(OH)D less than 25?nmol/L. Anxiety, depression, and HRQOL were not associated with 25(OH)D in the immigrant population. Anxiety was common in female immigrants from the Middle East (32.7%); and after adjustment, lower 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with higher risk of anxiety (25[OH]D?=?49?nmol/L vs 25[OH]D?=?50?nmol/L: odds ratio 23.2 [95% confidence interval 1.97 - 271.9] P?=?.012) in this subgroup only; however, reverse causality could not be excluded. In conclusion, the study showed no association between depression, anxiety, or HRQOL and vitamin D status in the immigrant population.
PubMed ID
32120223 View in PubMed
Less detail

Women with acute intermittent porphyria have a defect in 5a-steroid production during the menstrual cycle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121271
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1445-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Eva Innala
Torbjörn Bäckström
Inger Sundström Poromaa
Christer Andersson
Marie Bixo
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. eva.innala@vll.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2012 Dec;91(12):1445-52
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
3-Oxo-5-alpha-Steroid 4-Dehydrogenase - blood
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Estradiol - blood
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle - blood
Middle Aged
Porphyria, Acute Intermittent - blood
Pregnanolone - blood
Progesterone - blood
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
To measure serum concentrations of progesterone, estradiol and 5a- and 5ß-reduced progesterone metabolites in the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle in women with latent acute intermittent porphyria and manifest acute intermittent porphyria in comparison with healthy control women.
A descriptive study with repeated measurements during a complete, ovulatory menstrual cycle.
University hospital out-patient clinic.
Thirty-two women with DNA-diagnosed acute intermittent porphyria and 20 healthy control women.
Blood samples for serum progesterone, estradiol, allopregnanolone and pregnanolone were drawn on predefined menstrual cycle days, twice in the follicular phase and three times in the luteal phase. Serum levels of estradiol and progesterone were analysed with commercial kits. Allopregnanolone and pregnanolone levels were analysed with radioimmunoassay following diethylether extraction and celite column chromatography.
Changes in serum levels of progesterone, estradiol, allopregnanolone and pregnanolone throughout the menstrual cycle.
Women with acute intermittent porphyria displayed lower serum concentrations of allopregnanolone in comparison with healthy control women, the difference being most prominent in the luteal phase (p
PubMed ID
22924787 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.