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[A nationwide study in primary health care: One out of four patients suffers from anxiety and depression]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45934
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Mar 6;100(10):832-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-2003
Author
Christer Allgulander
Bo Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet, Neurotec-institutionen, sektionen för psykiatri, Huddinge Universitetssjukhus. Christer.Allgulander@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Mar 6;100(10):832-8
Date
Mar-6-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Anxiety and depression in Swedish primary care has rarely been studied. A national sample of 131 primary care physicians and their 1,348 patients during one day in September 2001 responded to questionnaires on somatic disease, social conditions, treatments, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. A total of 23% of the patients had generalized anxiety and/or depression with or without receiving treatment, i.e. the most common category following musculoskeletal conditions. The appointment was caused by anxiety in 7.1% of the patients, depression in 8.5%, and insomnia in 11%. This group of patients did not deviate much in terms of somatic and social conditions, except being younger. Doctors were confident in diagnosing and treating them. Five key questions can be used in primary care to screen for these common psychiatric conditions.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 5;100(23):2080-212833748
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Mar 27;100(13):116912705167
PubMed ID
12680020 View in PubMed
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Psychiatric caseness is a marker of major depressive episode in general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96376
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Jul 13;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-13-2010
Author
Søren Dinesen Ostergaard
Leslie Foldager
Christer Allgulander
Alv A Dahl
Marja-Terttu Huuhtanen
Ib Rasmussen
Povl Munk-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Unit for Psychiatric Research, Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Jul 13;
Date
Jul-13-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract Objective. Screening for a major depressive episode (MDE) in high-risk groups of patients within the primary care setting has been suggested by several Central Health Organizations. The objective of this study was to investigate whether patients rated as "psychiatric cases" by their general practitioner (GP) were likely to suffer from MDE and therefore qualified for systematic diagnostic screening. Design. Cross-sectional survey of primary care patients assessed through depression screening questionnaires and GP consultations. Setting. A total of 676 general practices in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. Subjects. A total of 8879 unselected primary care patients. Main outcome measures. Sensitivity, specificity, and Youden Index of the GPs' diagnoses of depression and psychiatric caseness versus patients' MDE status. Results. The proportion of primary care patients receiving a false-positive diagnosis of depression by their GP ranged from 12.4% to 25.2% depending on country. The corresponding numbers for the false-negative diagnoses were 0.5-2.5%. Among patients with MDE, GPs recognize the disease in 56-75% of cases. However, GPs recognize as many as 79-92% of patients with MDE as "psychiatric cases". Conclusions. This report confirms that misclassifications of MDE are common in the primary care setting. In addition, it shows that psychiatric caseness is a valid marker for the presence of MDE in primary care patients. This relationship should be considered in future screening recommendations.
PubMed ID
20624110 View in PubMed
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