Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

The influence of the stigma of obesity on H1N1 influenza vaccine sequencing in Canada in 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130031
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Dec 6;29(52):9607-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-6-2011
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Room 2830, St. John's NL, A1B 3V6, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2011 Dec 6;29(52):9607-10
Date
Dec-6-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Pregnancy
Social Stigma
Young Adult
Abstract
In 2009, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) provided guidelines about which groups should be given first access to the H1N1 influenza vaccine. These guidelines recommended that people under 65 with chronic health conditions should be among the first groups to receive the H1N1 influenza vaccine. Severe obesity was among the relevant chronic health conditions identified by PHAC. Since health care is under the jurisdiction of the ten Canadian provinces, the provinces were not required to follow these recommendations in their respective mass vaccination campaigns. Only one province (Manitoba) followed the PHAC recommendations with respect to severe obesity. Four provinces did not offer early vaccination to this group. Other provinces listed severe obesity as a sequencing category late in the vaccination campaign or placed narrow age restrictions on those who were given early access. This commentary argues that the Canadian provinces demonstrated an ambiguous commitment to the early vaccination of people who were severely obese, and that there is evidence that the stigma of obesity influenced H1N1 influenza vaccine sequencing decisions in many Canadian provinces.
PubMed ID
22041304 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounting for vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage in pandemic critical care triage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96997
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
J Clin Ethics. 2010;21(1):23-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Critical Care
Cultural Characteristics
Disaster Planning - trends
Disease Outbreaks
Health Care Rationing - ethics
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - ethnology - mortality - virology
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - standards
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Patient Selection - ethics
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Social Class
Triage - methods - organization & administration - standards - trends
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In a pandemic situation, resources in intensive care units may be stretched to the breaking point, and critical care triage may become necessary. In such a situation, I argue that a patient's combined vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage should be a justification for giving that patient some priority for critical care. In this article I present an example of a critical care triage protocol that recognizes the moral relevance of vulnerability to illness and social disadvantage, from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
20465071 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapting the Hamilton Health Sciences critical care pandemic triage protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144550
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(2):60-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Chris Kaposy
Natalie Bandrauk
Daryl Pullman
Rick Singleton
Fern Brunger
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Division of Community Health and Humanities, at Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland. christopher.kaposy@med.mun.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13(2):60-3
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Disease Outbreaks
Emergency Service, Hospital
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - therapy
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Organizational Case Studies
Triage - methods - organization & administration
PubMed ID
20357547 View in PubMed
Less detail