Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Assessment of consumption of marine food in Greenland by a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123804
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18361
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Charlotte Jeppesen
Marit Eika Jørgensen
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen K, Denmark. chj@niph.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18361
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Food Habits
Greenland
Humans
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Seafood
Abstract
We studied the association and agreement between questionnaire data and biomarkers of marine food among Greenland Inuit.
Cross sectional study.
The study population comprised 2,224 Inuit, age 18+ (43% men); data collected 2005-2008 in Greenland. Using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), we calculated consumption of seal, whale, and fish (g/day) and as meals/month, intake of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), total N3, and mercury. We measured erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (FA) and whole blood mercury (Hg). Associations were assessed by Pearson correlation and agreement between the 2 methods was assessed by Bland-Altman plots depicting mean difference between the methods. Using multiple linear regressions, the associations were studied between whole blood mercury, erythrocyte FA and frequency or gram per day of seal, whale, and fish.
Partial correlations ranged from r=0.16, p
Notes
Cites: Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2010 Sep;83(3):143-5020634051
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2000 Jan 17;245(1-3):187-9410682366
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 Oct;55(10):827-3211593343
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Feb 8;1(8476):307-102868172
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1991 Oct;54(4):668-731832813
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1996 Jul 16;186(1-2):67-938685710
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jan;13(1):54-6219490733
Cites: Lipids Health Dis. 2005;4:3016329761
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jul;86(1):74-8117616765
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2007 Aug;32(4):619-3417622276
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;62(6):733-817440518
Cites: Environ Health. 2008;7:2518518986
Cites: Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2005 Feb;80(1):155-6915727042
PubMed ID
22663940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between whole blood mercury and glucose intolerance among adult Inuit in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267334
Source
Environ Res. 2015 Nov;143(Pt A):192-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Charlotte Jeppesen
Beatriz Valera
Nina O Nielsen
Peter Bjerregaard
Marit E Jørgensen
Source
Environ Res. 2015 Nov;143(Pt A):192-7
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The Arctic diet is partly constituted by traditional food characterized by top predator animals such as whales, walrus, and seals with high mercury content. Mercury exposure has been associated with glucose intolerance in Western populations. We studied the association between whole blood mercury and glucose intolerance in a highly exposed non-Western population
Cross-sectional study of 2640 Inuit (18+ years) with information on ancestry, smoking, waist circumference, total energy intake, and physical activity. Mercury, fasting- and 2-h plasma glucose, insulin, and c-peptide were measured in blood. Fasting participants without diabetes were classified into normal glucose tolerance, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glycemia, or type 2 diabetes. We calculated hepatic insulin resistance with homoeostatic model assessment - insulin resistance index, peripheral insulin sensitivity by ISI0,120., and relative beta cell function by c-peptide/insulin ratio. We conducted adjusted linear- and logistic regression analyses.
For an increase in whole blood mercury of 5µg/L we found a positive association with fasting glucose [% change=0.25 (95% CI: 0.20; 0.30); p
PubMed ID
26497629 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumption of traditional food and adherence to nutrition recommendations in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122408
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Jul;40(5):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Charlotte Jeppesen
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
Centre of Health Research in Greenland, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. chj@niph.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Jul;40(5):475-81
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Female
Greenland
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose was to study the composition of the Inuit diet, to assess the adherence to nutritional recommendations among the Inuit in Greenland, and to discuss the potential role of traditional food in improving dietary quality.
Cross-sectional study of adult Inuit (18+ years) from Greenland (n=2752, 43% men). Data were collected by a food frequency questionnaire. Dietary contribution of nutrients was compared between quartiles of traditional food intake. A recommended macronutrient distribution range (RMDR) was constructed from the recommendations of Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (2004). The adherence to the RMDR was estimated and the food items' contribution to energy, macronutrients, subclasses of fats, fibres, and refined sugar were calculated.
Consumption of refined sugar and saturated fat decreased by increasing consumption of traditional food whereas the fat profile improved due to increasing consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids. Fibre intake decreased with increasing traditional food and 18% among both men and women complied to fibre recommendations. Compliance with polyunsaturated fatty acid recommendations was 27% for men and 36% for women. Compliance with n-3 fatty acids was 88% for men and 85% for women.
Increasing consumption of traditional food could benefit the dietary fat profile but will result in low fibre intake. Promotion of healthy-fibre-dense and low-fat imported food will increase the compliance to the fibre recommendation while traditional food could stay an integrated part of the Inuit diet and provide less saturated fat.
PubMed ID
22821228 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decrease in vitamin d status in the greenlandic adult population from 1987-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258440
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(12):e112949
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Nina O Nielsen
Marit E Jørgensen
Henrik Friis
Mads Melbye
Bolette Soborg
Charlotte Jeppesen
Marika Lundqvist
Arieh Cohen
David M Hougaard
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(12):e112949
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Low vitamin D status may be pronounced in Arctic populations due to limited sun exposure and decreasing intake of traditional food.
To investigate serum 25(OH)D3 as a measure of vitamin D status among adult Inuit in Greenland, predictors of low serum 25(OH)D3 concentrations and the trend from 1987 to 2005-2010.
A total of 2877 randomly selected Inuit (=18 years) from the Inuit Health in Transition study were included. A sub-sample (n?=?330) donated a blood sample in 1987 which allowed assessment of time trends in vitamin D status.
The geometric mean serum 25(OH)D3 (25[OH]D2 concentrations were negligible and not reported) in 2005-2010 was lowest among the 18-29 year old individuals (30.7 nmol/L; 95% CI: 29.7; 31.7) and increased with age. In all age-groups it decreased from 1987 to 2005-2010 (32%-58%). Low 25(OH)D3 concentrations (
Notes
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;72(3):690-310966885
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2014 Oct;144 Pt A:185-824333795
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2002 Jan;13(1):83-811883410
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Oct;25(10):1766-7112351475
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Jan;88(1):157-6112519845
Cites: Med Hypotheses. 2003 Nov-Dec;61(5-6):535-4214592784
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003 Dec;27(12):1507-1514634682
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 2004 Mar;74(3):255-6314708040
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-515513673
Cites: Arctic Med Res. 1988 Oct;47(4):173-83214507
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6 Suppl):1678S-88S15585788
Cites: J Chem Neuroanat. 2005 Jan;29(1):21-3015589699
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Mar;81(3):656-6315755836
Cites: Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2006 Sep;92(1):17-2516766240
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jul 19;357(3):266-8117634462
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2007 Oct 1;384(1-3):106-1917629548
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Oct;30(10):2569-7017626891
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2008 Feb;196(2):772-817306273
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2008 Apr;11(4):349-6017610753
Cites: Diabetes. 2008 Oct;57(10):2619-2518591391
Cites: Clin Chem. 2008 Nov;54(11):1931-218957567
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 23;169(6):626-3219307527
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 May;41(5):1102-1019346976
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2010;62(1):51-720043259
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2010 Oct;49(7):401-720204652
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Nov;104(10):1487-9120553638
Cites: South Med J. 2011 May;104(5):335-921606712
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Nov;39(7):678-8621948977
Cites: Bone. 2012 Mar;50(3):605-1022227435
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Aug;97(8):2644-5222573406
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(8):e4315922952641
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):928-3522682501
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2013 Jul 14;110(1):50-723182389
Cites: Nutrition. 2013 Oct;29(10):1204-823800567
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e8068624312237
Cites: Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2013 Dec;102(3):242-924176243
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e8114224324666
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Feb;68(2):165-7024197920
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Feb;17(2):462-7023399043
Cites: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2002 Feb;37(2):192-911843057
PubMed ID
25461952 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary patterns in Greenland and their relationship with type 2 diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258378
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Feb;17(2):462-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Charlotte Jeppesen
Peter Bjerregaard
Marit E Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
1 The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, 2nd floor, 1353 Copenhagen K, Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Feb;17(2):462-70
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology
Diet - ethnology
Energy intake
Fasting
Female
Glucose Intolerance - ethnology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Insulin - blood
Inuits
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Prediabetic State - ethnology
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
Traditional Inuit dietary patterns have been found to be beneficial for CVD but have not been investigated in relation to glucose intolerance. We examined the association between dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG).
Cross-sectional design with a priori derived dietary patterns from an FFQ resulted in five patterns: imported meat (n 196), traditional food (n 601), balanced diet (n 126), unhealthy diet (n 652) and standard diet (n 799).
Associations between dietary patterns and glucose-related outcomes were tested by linear and logistic regression analyses. Data included: dietary intake by FFQ, waist circumference, ethnicity, frequency of alcohol intake and smoking, physical activity, and oral glucose tolerance test results. Fasting participants and those without diagnosed T2DM were classified into normal glucose tolerance, IGT, IFG or T2DM. HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance index) and HOMA-ß (homeostatic model assessment of ß-cell function) were calculated.
Data included 2374 Inuit, aged 18+ years.
Participants with a traditional dietary pattern had higher fasting plasma glucose (mean 5·73 (95% CI 5·68, 5·78) mmol/l, P
PubMed ID
23399043 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exposure to persistent organic pollutants and risk of hypertension among Inuit from Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116639
Source
Environ Res. 2013 Apr;122:65-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Beatriz Valera
Marit E Jørgensen
Charlotte Jeppesen
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public health, Copenhagen, Denmark. beatriz.valera@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Environ Res. 2013 Apr;122:65-73
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - pharmacology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mercury - toxicity
Middle Aged
Pesticides - blood - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - toxicity
Selenium - toxicity
Abstract
Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is of concern in Arctic populations since these contaminants accumulate in fish and marine mammals, which is an important part of the traditional diet of these populations. Epidemiological and experimental studies have reported significant associations between POPs and increased blood pressure (BP) in populations with different degrees of exposure.
We aimed to assess the risk of hypertension related to increasing levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine (OC) pesticides.
Fifteen PCBs and 11 OC pesticides or their metabolites were determined in plasma of 1614 Inuit adults = 18 years living in 9 towns and 13 villages in Greenland. BP was measured using a standardized protocol. The risk of hypertension was estimated through logistic regression using POPs as continuous variables (log-transformed). Hypertension was defined as systolic BP = 140 mm Hg, diastolic BP = 90 mm Hg and/or antihypertensive treatment.
Overall, the odd ratios (ORs) of hypertension were not statistically significant for dioxin-like PCBs, non-dioxin-like PCBs and OC pesticides after adjusting for confounders. Once the analyses were stratified by age category (18-39 and = 40 years), increased risk of hypertension was observed for total dioxin-like PCBs among the youngest [OR: 1.34 (95% CI: 1.03-1.74)] while a borderline protective effect was observed for total non-dioxin-like PCBs [OR: 0.81 (95% CI: 0.66-0.99)] among the oldest. Higher risk of hypertension was also associated with increasing p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) concentrations among the youngest [OR: 1.42 (95% CI: 1.08-1.85)].
Overall, no significant associations were observed between PCBs, OC pesticides and blood pressure in this highly exposed population although the associations differed by age category.
PubMed ID
23375553 View in PubMed
Less detail

Glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to glucose intolerance among Greenland's Inuit population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124176
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012 Aug;97(2):298-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Marieke A van Aerde
Daniel R Witte
Charlotte Jeppesen
Sabita S Soedamah-Muthu
Peter Bjerregaard
Marit E Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark.
Source
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012 Aug;97(2):298-305
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - ethnology
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - metabolism
Fasting - blood
Female
Glucose Intolerance - blood - ethnology
Glycemic Index
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Male
Risk factors
Abstract
Intake of carbohydrates which elicit a large glycemic response is hypothesized to increase the risk of diabetes. However, studies assessing the relationship between glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and diabetes are inconsistent. Only few studies have studied the relationship between GI and GL and markers of glucose metabolism, mostly in western populations.
To determine the relationship between GI and GL and indices of glucose metabolism and prevalence of diabetes in Greenland's Inuit population.
The Inuit Health in Transition Study is a geographically representative cross-sectional study among aged =18years. Diet was assessed using a 67-item food frequency questionnaire. Logistic and linear regression was used to assess the association between GI and GL and diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose, 2h plasma glucose, HOMA2-IR and HOMA2-%Ã?.
No association was found between GI and GL and diabetes. GL was significantly inversely associated with IFG (OR: 0.91 (0.84-0.98)). While GI was positively associated with FPG, GL was positively associated with both HOMA2-IR and HOMA2-%Ã? and inversely associated with IFG.
These findings do not support a link between dietary GI or GL and risk of type 2 diabetes among Greenland's Inuit population.
PubMed ID
22613264 View in PubMed
Less detail

Introduction [Food Security and Our Environments]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286382
Source
Pages 315-316 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Charlotte Jeppesen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Research in Greenland, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark
Source
Pages 315-316 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
Less detail

Inuit dietary patterns in modern Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97997
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Feb;69(1):13-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Peter Bjerregaard
Charlotte Jeppesen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, DK-1353 Copenhagen, Denmark. pb@niph.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Feb;69(1):13-24
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Diet - ethnology
Female
Food Habits
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to apply two different approaches of dietary pattern definition to data from Greenland and to analyse the contemporary dietary patterns of the Inuit in Greenland in relation to urbanization and socio-economic positions. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional population survey. METHODS: A total of 2,247 Inuit aged 18+ from 15 towns and villages in West Greenland (25% of all communities) were interviewed about their diet as part of a general health survey. A 67-item Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) with portion sizes was used as the survey instrument. The analyses were based on 2,026 individuals who reported realistic daily energy intakes. Dietary patterns were determined by two different methods: a factor-cum-cluster analysis, and a normative approach based on adherence to dietary recommendations. RESULTS: The 2 approaches resulted in 6 respective and 5 partly overlapping dietary patterns. The distribution of patterns varied significantly according to age, gender, urbanization and socio-economic position. A healthy diet was most often reported by women aged 35+, who lived in towns and who belonged to the upper social stratum; an unhealthy diet was reported by young men and women irrespective of urbanization or social position; and a traditional diet was reported increasingly with age, among village residents and by hunters/fishermen and their families. CONCLUSIONS: The two methodological approaches gave comparable results. The normative approach can be extended to other data sets and its results are directly applicable to dietary intervention, while the data-driven approach can identify novel patterns but is tied to the actual data set.
PubMed ID
20167153 View in PubMed
Less detail

Obesity studies in the circumpolar Inuit: a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122841
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18698
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tracey Galloway
Hilary Blackett
Susan Chatwood
Charlotte Jeppesen
Kami Kandola
Janice Linton
Peter Bjerregaard
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous People's Nutrition and Environment, School of Dietetics and Nutrition, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. tracey.galloway@mcgill.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18698
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Among circumpolar populations, recent research has documented a significant increase in risk factors which are commonly associated with chronic disease, notably obesity.
The present study undertakes a scoping review of research on obesity in the circumpolar Inuit to determine the extent obesity research has been undertaken, how well all subpopulations and geographic areas are represented, the methodologies used and whether they are sufficient in describing risk factors, and the prevalence and health outcomes associated with obesity.
Online databases were used to identify papers published 1992-2011, from which we selected 38 publications from Canada, the United States, and Greenland that used obesity as a primary or secondary outcome variable in 30 or more non-pregnant Inuit ("Eskimo") participants aged 2 years or older.
The majority of publications (92%) reported cross-sectional studies while 8% examined retrospective cohorts. All but one of the studies collected measured data. Overall 84% of the publications examined obesity in adults. Those examining obesity in children focused on early childhood or adolescence. While most (66%) reported 1 or more anthropometric indices, none incorporated direct measures of adiposity. Evaluated using a customized quality assessment instrument, 26% of studies achieved an "A" quality ranking, while 18 and 39% achieved quality rankings of "B" and "C", respectively.
While the quality of studies is generally high, research on obesity among Inuit would benefit from careful selection of methods and reference standards, direct measures of adiposity in adults and children, studies of preadolescent children, and prospective cohort studies linking early childhood exposures with obesity outcomes throughout childhood and adolescence.
PubMed ID
22765938 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.