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A 3-year follow-up of participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53243
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Otto Torells Gata 16, Varberg 432 44, Sweden. Catherine.Hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary prevention is an important component of a structured rehabilitation programme following a cardiac event. Comprehensive programmes have been developed in many European countries, the vast majority of which are hospital based. In Sweden, all patients with cardiac disease are also given the opportunity to participate in secondary prevention activities arranged by the National Association for Heart and Lung Patients [The Heart & Lung School (HL)]. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare persons who attended the HL after a cardiac event and those who declined participation, with regard to health aspects, life situation, social network and support, clinical data, rehospitalisation and mortality. Totally 220 patients were included in the study. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire on four occasions, in addition to visiting a health care center for physical examination. After 3 years, 160 persons were still participating, 35 of whom attended the HL. The results show that persons who participated in the HL exercised more regularly, smoked less and had a denser network as well as more social support from nonfamily members than the comparison groups. This study contributes to increased knowledge among healthcare professionals, politicians and decision makers about peer support groups as a support strategy after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
15572020 View in PubMed
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Access to the world after myocardial infarction: experiences of the recovery process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70416
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Evy Lidell
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Sweden. hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2006 Mar-Apr;31(2):63-8; discussion 69
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Attitude to Health
Family - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Change Events
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - organization & administration
Self Care - methods - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Myocardial infarction (MI) is a traumatic health event and at the same time a transition of vital importance in human life. The purpose of this study was to elucidate recovery patterns after myocardial infarction with regard to the content of patients' experiences. The study used a descriptive design and a qualitative method. Interviews with 16 men and women were performed, and data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. The recovery process had a pattern of ability, restraints, and reorientation. Through self-help and help from others, the mutual sharing of burdens, and clarifying restraints to recovery, the recovery process progressed toward reorientation. New values and motivation for change, as well as a new balance within the self and relationships were found. The MI had been integrated into life and, through the recovery process, patients' attitudes were better focused, leading to an enhanced quality of life.
PubMed ID
16526524 View in PubMed
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Coping strategies of relatives when an adult next-of-kin is recovering at home following critical illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70899
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2004 Oct;20(5):281-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Ingrid Johansson
Bengt Fridlund
Cathrine Hildingh
Author Affiliation
Intensive Care Clinic, Helsingborg Hospital Co., SE-251 87, Sweden. ingrid.j-son@telia.com
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2004 Oct;20(5):281-91
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Altruism
Attitude to Health
Convalescence - psychology
Cost of Illness
Critical Illness - psychology - rehabilitation
Family - psychology
Female
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Recovery of Function
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Voluntary Workers - psychology
Abstract
The trend within the Swedish healthcare system is to reduce the duration of hospital care. This means that a patient who is discharged to their home after critical illness is highly likely to be functionally impaired, and therefore, requires care-giving assistance from a family member. The aim of this study was to generate a theoretical model with regard to relatives' coping when faced with the situation of having an adult next-of-kin recovering at home after critical illness. The design incorporated grounded theory methodology. Four coping strategies exhibiting different characteristics were identified: volunteering, accepting, modulating and sacrificing. Factors determining the choice of coping strategy were the physical and psychological status of the relative, previous experience of ICU-care and the psychological status of the patient. The theoretical model described in this article can contribute to expanding healthcare professionals' understanding of the coping strategies of relatives during recovery, but also provide inspiration for social action to be taken.
PubMed ID
15450617 View in PubMed
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Dietary advice on prescription: experiences with a weight reduction programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281161
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Mar;26(5-6):795-804
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Marie Bräutigam-Ewe
Marie Lydell
Jörgen Månsson
Gunnar Johansson
Cathrine Hildingh
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Mar;26(5-6):795-804
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Counseling
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Female
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Obesity - nursing
Overweight - nursing
Primary Health Care - methods
Sweden
Weight Reduction Programs
Abstract
To describe overweight persons' experiences with weight reduction and participation in the dietary advice on prescription.
Approximately 20% of overweight individuals are able to successfully lose weight. Experiences from earlier weight reduction programmes indicate that those who succeed typically manage to avoid overeating to handle stress and have high motivation to lose weight. Those who fail have low self-control and engage in negative health behaviours such as eating when experiencing negative emotions and stress.
The study used a descriptive qualitative design and was conducted at a Primary Health Care Centre in south-west Sweden.
The first nineteen study participants who completed the weight reduction programme in two years responded in writing to five open questions about their experiences with the programme. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis.
The participants appreciated the face-to-face meetings with the nurse because they felt seen and listened to during these sessions. They also felt their life situations and self-discipline had an impact on how well they were able to follow the programme. Dietary advice on prescription advice was considered to be helpful for achieving behavioural changes and losing weight. People who succeeded in sustainably losing weight described the importance of support from partners or close friends.
To achieve sustainable weight reduction, it is important to individualise the programme in order to address each person's life situation and the unique difficulties they may encounter.
Motivational interviewing appears to be a good technique for developing a successful relationship between the nurse and the patient. The dietary advice on prescription advice was perceived to be a good way to improve food habits and can easily be used at many Primary Health Care Centres. Patient's partners should also be offered the opportunity to participate in the programme.
PubMed ID
27549032 View in PubMed
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Health Promotion in Nursing Education: attitudes among nurse students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278460
Source
Acta Biomed. 2015 Sep 09;86 Suppl 2:91-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-09-2015
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Laura Cunico
Eva-Carin Lindgren
Evy Lidell
Source
Acta Biomed. 2015 Sep 09;86 Suppl 2:91-6
Date
Sep-09-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Body mass index
Education, Nursing
Female
Health Behavior
Health promotion
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Smoking
Students, Nursing - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The World Health Organization (WHO) European Strategy for Nursing and Midwifery has called for the explicit inclusion and application of health promotion in all nursing curricula. However, research indicates that there are deficiencies in nursing education regarding health promotion in both the theoretical and practical elements of education. Insight into the experiences of European nursing students' attitudes, positive or negative, about working in health promotion may provide a clue whether health promotion will be regarded as an important task and to what extent it will have priority in different parts of Europe.
The aim of this study was to compare Italian and Swedish nursing students' attitudes towards health promotion practice on matriculation to nursing school and after a three-year nursing education, and to explore whether attitudes towards health promotion practice correlate with BMI and smoking.
The study involved students who started their nursing education in autumn 2009 (n =240). Data were collected via a questionnaire.
The results show that the Swedish students had a more positive stance on health promotion than Italian students did. After completion of a three-year nursing education programme, Italian students' attitudes on health promotion had improved, while no such development was seen in Sweden. Further, no correlation between lifestyle issues and attitudes to health promotion was found.
Health promotion in nursing education may have important influence on students' attitudes and thereby on the quantity and quality of future health promotion practice.
PubMed ID
26629663 View in PubMed
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Lifestyle advice and lifestyle change: to what degree does lifestyle advice of healthcare professionals reach the population, focusing on gender, age and education?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277579
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Mar;29(1):118-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Elisabeth Brobeck
Håkan Bergh
Sigrid Odencrants
Cathrine Hildingh
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Mar;29(1):118-25
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Educational Status
Female
Health Personnel
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Sex Factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Health promotion practice in health care has a high priority in the endeavour to achieve equal opportunities for health and diversity in health among the population. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether there is any connection between the lifestyle advice given by healthcare professionals and the lifestyle change of the population, focusing on age, gender and education level. The study is based on the data from a national population survey in Sweden in which 52 595 patients who had attended health care were interviewed by phone. The participants were asked whether healthcare professionals had raised the subject of lifestyle during the visit and whether the advice they gave had contributed to a lifestyle change. The results indicated that lifestyle issues were raised with 32.2% of those who attended health care, particularly among men, younger patients and those with a high education level. When lifestyle issues were raised, the advice contributed to 39.2% of patients making a lifestyle change, to a higher extent among men, older patients and those with a low education level. The study shows that lifestyle advice given by healthcare professionals, during both emergency and outpatient healthcare visits, is an important contributor to patients' lifestyle change.
PubMed ID
24712639 View in PubMed
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The nurse-patient relationship in pre-hospital emergency care--from the perspective of Swedish specialist ambulance nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102775
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2013 Oct;21(4):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Tommy Berntsson
Cathrine Hildingh
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2013 Oct;21(4):257-63
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulances
Attitude of Health Personnel
Emergency Medical Services - manpower
Emergency Nursing - education
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The development of the Swedish ambulance service has resulted in three different competence levels in Swedish ambulance teams: specialist ambulance nurses, registered nurses and emergency medical technicians. A nursing scientific model developed by Peplau (Peplau, H., 1991. Interpersonal Relations in Nursing. Springer Publishing Company, New York.) breaks down the nurse-patient relationship into a number of phases: an orientation, an identification, an exploitation and a resolution phase. This model has then been adapted to the pre-hospital emergency care by Suserud (Dahlberg, K., Segesten, K., Nystr?m, M., Suserud, B.-O., Fagerberg, I., 2003. Att f?rst? v?rdvetenskap [To Understand Caring Science]. Studentlitteratur, Lund.). The purpose of this study was to explore, by direct content analysis, how the phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship described by Suserud (Dahlberg et al., 2003), emerge in 17 specialist ambulance nursing students descriptions of ambulance missions. The results show that the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship could be identified and each phase includes several different parts. Furthermore, the results show that the parts of each phase can vary depending on the patient's condition and the environmental circumstances of the ambulance mission. This improved understanding of the four phases of the pre-hospital nurse-patient relationship, and their parts, could be used by ambulance team members as a support during the pre-hospital caring process in ambulance missions. This new knowledge could also be used in education.
PubMed ID
23245810 View in PubMed
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Nurses' perceptions of providing advice via a telephone care line.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166063
Source
Br J Nurs. 2006 Nov 9-22;15(20):1119-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mayvor Ström
Bertil Marklund
Cathrine Hildingh
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, Halland, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nurs. 2006 Nov 9-22;15(20):1119-25
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Awareness
Clinical Competence - standards
Communication
Counseling - organization & administration
Hotlines - organization & administration
Humans
Job Description
Job Satisfaction
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - organization & administration - psychology
Nursing, Supervisory - organization & administration
Professional Autonomy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Risk Management
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Triage - organization & administration
Abstract
The provision of advice over the telephone in the health service has become more common in the Western world and in Sweden this task is allocated to nurses. There are several million calls a year to the medical care telephone helpline. Nurses answer the calls, provide advice and direct the flow of patients to the most appropriate treatment level. The aim of this study was to describe how nurses perceive their job of providing telephone advice to patients. Interviews with 12 nurses were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach. The nurses perceived their work as stimulating, autonomous and challenging. They also felt exposed because extensive knowledge is required and there is a risk of being criticized, as they are in a front-line position. Nurses who are responsive, determined and not anxious about their prestige can carry out the work well, provided they have a good level of self-awareness. Personal qualities and the confidence of superiors make even an exposed position with considerable requirements manageable.
PubMed ID
17170661 View in PubMed
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Participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event: a 12-month follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53515
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2003 Jul-Aug;28(4):123-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden. cathrine.hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Rehabil Nurs. 2003 Jul-Aug;28(4):123-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - psychology - rehabilitation
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Peer Group
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Social Support
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
All cardiac patients in Sweden are given the opportunity to participate in group activities that are arranged by the Swedish National Association for Heart and Lung Patients through a program called The Heart School. In this study, we compared persons who participated in the Heart School activities (n = 59, intervention group) with persons who declined to participate (n = 125, comparison group) with regard to their: self-rated health, life situation, social support, clinical data, rehospitalization, and mortality. Participants completed a questionnaire at 2 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months after discharge from a hospital. They also visited a healthcare center for physical examinations. The intervention group reported more physical symptoms and a higher degree of social support. No other differences were found between the groups. Differences within groups were that the intervention group had increased their physical activities and had eventually stopped smoking. This study adds to the knowledge about the use of peer support groups as a support strategy and supports their use in long-term rehabilitation after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
12875145 View in PubMed
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Patient care encounters with the MCHL: a questionnaire study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136853
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2011 Sep;25(3):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Mayvor Ström
Amir Baigi
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Mattsson
Bertil Marklund
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, Halland, Sweden. mayvor.strom@lthalland.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2011 Sep;25(3):517-24
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Both internationally and nationally, the medical care help line (MCHL) is a growing operation within the healthcare field. In Sweden, approximately 5 million calls per year are processed. The service is managed by specially trained nurses.
To describe how patients' sex, age, education level and care level influenced their perceptions of care encounters with the MCHL.
A questionnaire was designed through the operationalisation of terms based on a previous interview study with MCHL callers. It was distributed to 858 callers in a region of southwest Sweden. The questionnaire was comprised of 14 visual analogue scales (VAS). Validity and reliability were determined to be acceptable by a pilot study and factor analyses.
Response frequency n = 517 (60.4 %). Three factors, interaction, service and product, emerged to describe high satisfaction with the MCHL from different perspectives. The items 'friendliness', 'respect', 'confirmation', 'accessibility' and 'simplicity' scored highest, whereas the 'joint decision-making', 'composure' and 'time' items had the lowest values.
A new questionnaire with acceptable validity and reliability was created on the basis of an interview study examining patient encounters with the MCHL. The new questionnaire may provide useful support in the education of MCHL nurses and other nurses in telephone triage. It can also be used for quality development and as a basis for further research on telephone nursing.
PubMed ID
21338380 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.