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American Indian women cancer survivors' coping with depressive symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296938
Source
J Psychosoc Oncol. 2018 Dec 28; :1-15
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-28-2018
Author
Catherine E Burnette
Soonhee Roh
Jessica Liddell
Yeon-Shim Lee
Author Affiliation
a School of Social Work , Tulane University , New Orleans , LA , USA.
Source
J Psychosoc Oncol. 2018 Dec 28; :1-15
Date
Dec-28-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Depressive symptoms have been identified as a primary predictor of quality of life among cancer patients. Depression and cancer are co-occurring and disproportionately elevated for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women. The purpose of this article is to examine American Indian (AI) women cancer survivors' coping mechanisms for depressive symptoms.
The methodology included a qualitative descriptive approach with conventional content analysis to examine the coping strategies of AI women cancer survivors associated with depressive symptoms. The interview guide was semi-structured and developed in collaboration with a community advisory board (CAB). Data-derived qualitative analysis was used to generate codes inductively from the data.
A sample of 43 AI women cancer survivors (n?=?14 cervical cancer, n?=?14 breast cancer, and n?=?15 other cancers) from the Northern Plains region, in the state of South Dakota were interviewed. Data were collected from June 2014 to February 2015. Methodological approach: Qualitative content analysis was used for data analysis, which allowed themes to emerge inductively from the data. Analysis revealed 430 preliminary codes. After de-briefing, validation, and discussion among coauthors, these were then sorted into 67 codes. Member checks with all available participants were conducted to minimize misinterpretation.
A total of 26 participants (62%) indicated they had feelings of depression since their cancer diagnosis. Women coped with depressive feelings by (a) participating in faith traditions; (b) seeking creative and positive outlets; (c) martialing family and social support; and (d) keeping busy with other life activities.
AI women experienced depressive symptoms following a cancer diagnosis and used a variety of positive coping mechanisms to create personal meaning. Implications for Psychosocial Providers or Policy: AI women may need unique support following a cancer diagnosis, and interventions should incorporate AI beliefs and traditions, such as storytelling and talking with family and community members.
PubMed ID
30590999 View in PubMed
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American Indian Women Cancer Survivor's Needs and Preferences: Community Support for Cancer Experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290316
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2018 Mar 15; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-15-2018
Author
Catherine E Burnette
Soonhee Roh
Jessica Liddell
Yeon-Shim Lee
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Tulane University, 127 Elk Place, #8906, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA. cburnet3@tulane.edu.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2018 Mar 15; :
Date
Mar-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Cancer (the focus of this inquiry) is the leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native women. The purpose of this study was to identify American Indian women cancer survivors' needs and preferences related to community supports for their cancer experience. This qualitative study examined female American Indian cancer survivors' needs and preferences about community support. The sample included 43 American Indian women cancer survivors (the types of cancer survivors included cervical cancer: n?=?14; breast cancer: n?=?14; and colon and other types: n?=?15) residing in the Northern Plains region, in the state of South Dakota. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis and were collected between June of 2014 and February of 2015. When asked about their needs and preferences, 82% of participants (n?=?35) of female American Indian cancer survivors reported at least one of the following most commonly reported themes: cancer support groups (n?=?31, 72%), infrastructure for community support (n?=?17, 40%), and cancer education (n?=?11, 26%). In addition to the aforementioned themes, 33% of participants (n?=?14) indicated the need for an improved healthcare system, with 11% (n?=?5) of participants expressly desiring the integration of spirituality and holistic healing options. The majority of American Indian women cancer survivor participants of this study identified a need for more community-based support systems and infrastructures to aid with the cancer survivor experience. Results warrant a community approach to raise awareness, education, and support for American Indian cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
29546486 View in PubMed
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American Indian women cancer survivors' perceptions and experiences with conventional and non-conventional mental health care for depressive symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292668
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 Jul 02; :1-20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-02-2018
Author
Catherine E Burnette
Jessica Liddell
Soonhee Roh
Yeon-Shim Lee
Hee Yun Lee
Author Affiliation
a School of Social Work , Tulane University , New Orleans , USA.
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 Jul 02; :1-20
Date
Jul-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Despite cancer and depression being disproportionately high for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women, such cancer survivors' help-seeking practices and perceptions related to depression are absent in extant research. A broader context of historical oppression has set the stage for unequal health outcomes and access to quality services. The purpose of this article was to explore AI women cancer survivors' experiences with conventional mental health services and informal and tribally-based assistance, as well as barriers related to mental health service utilization.
A qualitative descriptive study methodology, with qualitative content analysis, was used to examine the experiences of AI women cancer survivors as they related to help-seeking experiences for depressive symptoms. The sample included 43 AI women cancer survivors (n?=?14 breast cancer, n?=?14 cervical cancer, and n?=?15 colon and other types of cancer survivors).
Since receiving a cancer diagnosis, 26 (62%) participants indicated they had feelings of depression. Some participants (n?=?13) described mixed perceptions of the mental health service system. Generally, participants viewed families and informal support systems as primary forms of assistance, whereas conventional services were reported as a supplementary or 'as needed' forms of support, particularly when the informal support system was lacking. Participants received help in the forms of psychotropic medications and psychotherapy, as well as help from family and AI-specific healing modalities (e.g. sweat lodges and healing ceremonies). Stigma and confidentiality concerns were primary barriers to utilizing conventional services as described by 12 (29%) participants.
Participants' help primarily came from family and tribally-based entities, with conventional mental health care being more salient when informal supports were lacking. The mixed perceptions espoused by participants may be related to a broader context of historical oppression; family and social support and tribally-based services may be protective factors for cancer survivors with depression.
PubMed ID
29962228 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular Health among U.S. Indigenous Peoples: A Holistic and Sex-Specific Systematic Review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306687
Source
J Evid Based Soc Work (2019). 2020; 17(1):24-48
Publication Type
Journal Article
Systematic Review
Author
Catherine E Burnette
Kristi Ka'apu
Jennifer Miller Scarnato
Jessica Liddell
Author Affiliation
Tulane University School of Social Work.
Source
J Evid Based Soc Work (2019). 2020; 17(1):24-48
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Systematic Review
Keywords
American Natives
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology
Indigenous peoples
Male
Obesity - ethnology
Risk factors
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this systematic review is to examine mental, sociocultural, behavioral, and physical risk and protective factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related outcomes among U.S. Indigenous peoples.
A total of 51 articles met the inclusion criteria of research focusing factors for CVD among U.S. Indigenous peoples (Mental n= 15; Sociocultural, n =17; Behavioral/Physical, n =19).
This review reveals clear risks for CVD, which tended to be elevated for females. Mental health problems (depression, anxiety, PTSD/trauma, alcohol and other drug (AOD) abuse) were clearly associated with CVD, along with enculturation, social support, and the social environment-including discrimination and trauma. Poor diet and obesity, diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol were behavioral or physical factors.
Overall, identified research was limited and in beginning stages, lacking more information on etiology of the interconnections across sex and the mental, sociocultural, and behavioral determinants of CVD.
PubMed ID
32133411 View in PubMed
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A Culturally Informed Systematic Review of Mental Health Disparities Among Adult Indigenous Men and Women of the USA: What is known?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301902
Source
Br J Soc Work. 2019 Jun; 49(4):880-898
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Kristi Ka'apu
Catherine E Burnette
Author Affiliation
Hilo Medical Center, Hilo, Hawaii.
Source
Br J Soc Work. 2019 Jun; 49(4):880-898
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Related to a broader context of historical oppression, Indigenous peoples of the USA are overburdened with the mental health challenges that social workers tend to treat, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, suicide and substance use disorders (SUD). The purpose of this systematic review is to use the Framework of Historical Oppression, Resilience and Transcendence (FHORT) to identify empirical research on risk and protective factors related to mental health and SUD amongst these populations. This systematic review includes peer-reviewed quantitative and qualitative research articles from 1980 to 2017 focusing on the mental health of US Indigenous adults. A total of thirty-eight peer-reviewed empirical articles met inclusion criteria. Results reveal adults within Indigenous populations are at a high risk for mental health outcomes, including PTSD, depression, suicide, SUD and comorbidity across these outcomes. Underlying risk factors across outcomes included historical oppression and loss, family problems and SUD. Protective factors tended to include family and social support and engagement with tribal cultural activities. Significant variability was identified based on gender and geographic regions. Given that protective factors tended to include cultural, familial and community tenets, holistic approaches are the most promising programmes for social workers to work towards.
PubMed ID
31308574 View in PubMed
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Understanding the social and community support networks of American Indian women cancer survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290949
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 Apr 02; :1-13
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-02-2018
Author
Catherine E Burnette
Jessica Liddell
Soonhee Roh
Yeon-Shim Lee
Hee Yun Lee
Author Affiliation
a School of Social Work , Tulane University , New Orleans , LA , USA.
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 Apr 02; :1-13
Date
Apr-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Cancer is the leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women, and although cancer disparities among AI women are alarming, there is little research focused on the topic of social support and cancer treatment and outcomes.
A community advisory board was used to develop and administer the project, and a qualitative descriptive study methodology was used. This research was conducted in partnership with two community-based hospitals in the Northern Plains. The sample included 43 AI female cancer survivors who were interviewed with a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using content analysis.
Emergent themes revealed that AI cancer survivors' non-familial support systems included friends (n?=?12), support groups (n?=?6), churches (n?=?10), co-workers (n?=?5), communities (n?=?4), support from health practitioners (n?=?3) and additional forms of support.
Results indicate that survivors' networks are diverse, and support broad prevention programs that reach out to churches, community groups, and online forums. These sources of supports can be enhanced through sustainable community-based infrastructures.
PubMed ID
29609476 View in PubMed
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Understanding the social and community support networks of American Indian women cancer survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292650
Source
J Evid Inf Soc Work. 2018 Jul 06; :1-13
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-06-2018
Author
Yeon-Shim Lee
Catherine E Burnette
Jessica Liddell
Soonhee Roh
Author Affiliation
a School of Social Work, San Francisco State University , San Francisco , CA , USA.
Source
J Evid Inf Soc Work. 2018 Jul 06; :1-13
Date
Jul-06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Cancer is the leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women. Although cancer disparities among AI women are alarming, there is littlle research focused on the topic of social support and cancer treatment and outcomes. A community advisory board was used to develop and administer the project, and a qualitative descriptive study methodology was used. This research was conducted in partnership with two community-based hospitals in the Northern Plains. The sample included 43 AI female cancer survivors who were interviewed with a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Emergent themes revealed that AI cancer survivors' non-familial support systems included friends (n = 12), support groups (n = 6), churches (n = 10), co-workers (n = 5), communities (n = 4), support from health practitioners (n = 3), and additional forms of support. Results indicate that survivors' networks are diverse and support broad prevention programs that reach out to churches, community groups, and online forums. These sources of supports can be enhanced through sustainable community-based infrastructures.
PubMed ID
29979943 View in PubMed
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Understanding the social and community support networks of American Indian women cancer survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296564
Source
J Evid Inf Soc Work. 2018 Sep-Oct; 15(5):481-493
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Yeon-Shim Lee
Catherine E Burnette
Jessica Liddell
Soonhee Roh
Author Affiliation
a School of Social Work, San Francisco State University , San Francisco , CA , USA.
Source
J Evid Inf Soc Work. 2018 Sep-Oct; 15(5):481-493
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cancer Survivors - psychology
Female
Friends - psychology
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Religion
Residence Characteristics
Self-Help Groups
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Cancer is the leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women. Although cancer disparities among AI women are alarming, there is littlle research focused on the topic of social support and cancer treatment and outcomes. A community advisory board was used to develop and administer the project, and a qualitative descriptive study methodology was used. This research was conducted in partnership with two community-based hospitals in the Northern Plains. The sample included 43 AI female cancer survivors who were interviewed with a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Emergent themes revealed that AI cancer survivors' non-familial support systems included friends (n = 12), support groups (n = 6), churches (n = 10), co-workers (n = 5), communities (n = 4), support from health practitioners (n = 3), and additional forms of support. Results indicate that survivors' networks are diverse and support broad prevention programs that reach out to churches, community groups, and online forums. These sources of supports can be enhanced through sustainable community-based infrastructures.
PubMed ID
29979943 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.