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Associations between childhood hearing loss and behavioural and academic difficulties: A Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281144
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Nov;90:91-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Janni Niclasen
Carsten Obel
Christian Guldager
Simone Pleinert
Jesper Dammeyer
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Nov;90:91-98
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Hearing Loss - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Learning Disorders - epidemiology
Male
Parents
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Negative associations between hearing loss (HL) and behavioural and academic difficulties have been reported. However, most studies are based on small clinical samples. The aim of the present study was to investigate such associations using data from a large-scale non-clinical Danish birth cohort controlling for a large number of relevant confounding factors.
The study applied data from the Aarhus Birth Cohort's 10-12-year-old follow-up (N = 7599). Associations between parent-reported HL on the one hand, and parent- and teacher-reported behavioural difficulties measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and parent-reported academic difficulties on the other hand, were investigated.
After controlling for relevant confounding factors, significant associations were observed between parent-reported HL and parent- and teacher-reported Externalising scores, and academic difficulties.
Childhood HL is associated with behavioural and academic difficulties. Parent reported HL in a non-clinical cohort is indicative for academic and behavioural difficulties.
PubMed ID
27729161 View in PubMed
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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the offspring following prenatal maternal bereavement: a nationwide follow-up study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96867
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010 May 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-22-2010
Author
Jiong Li
Jørn Olsen
Mogens Vestergaard
Carsten Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, The Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Institute of Public Health, The University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark, jl@soci.au.dk.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010 May 22;
Date
May-22-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Severe prenatal stress exposure has been found to increase the risk of neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia. We examined the risk of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the offspring following prenatal maternal bereavement, as a potential source of stress exposure. We conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study including all 1,015,912 singletons born in Denmark from 1987 to 2001. A total of 29,094 children were born to women who lost a close relative during pregnancy or up to 1 year before pregnancy. These children were included in the exposed cohort and other children were in the unexposed cohort. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios for ADHD, defined as the first-time ADHD hospitalization or first-time ADHD medication after 3 years of age. Boys born to mothers who were bereaved by unexpected death of a child or a spouse, had a 72% increased risk of ADHD [hazard ratio (HR) 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-2.73]. Boys born to mothers who lost a child or a spouse during 0-6 months before pregnancy and during pregnancy had a HR of 1.47 (95% CI 1.00-2.16) and 2.10 (95% CI 1.16-3.80), respectively. Our findings suggest that prenatal maternal exposure to severe stress may increase the risk of ADHD in the offspring.
PubMed ID
20495989 View in PubMed
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Bereavement in early life and later childhood overweight.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117874
Source
Obes Facts. 2012;5(6):881-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jiong Li
Jørn Olsen
Mogens Vestergaard
Carsten Obel
Jennifer L Baker
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. jl@soci.au.dk
Source
Obes Facts. 2012;5(6):881-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bereavement
Body mass index
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Obesity - etiology - psychology
Overweight
Parental Death
Parents
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The rise in the occurrence of childhood obesity during the last decades in many populations indicates an important role of environmental exposures, which may operate very early in life. We aimed to examine the association between bereavement during the first 6 years of life, as a stress indicator, and subsequent risk of overweight in school-aged children.
We followed 46,401 singletons born in Denmark who underwent annual health examinations at 7-13 years of age in school of Copenhagen. A total of 492 children experienced bereavement by death of a parent during the first 6 years of life. We compared BMI levels, changes in BMI, and the prevalence of overweight at 7-13 years of age between bereaved and non-bereaved children.
Between bereaved children and non-bereaved children, there were no differences in average BMI levels at any age or changes in BMI at 7-13 years of age. Bereavement during the first 6 years of life was not associated with an increased risk of overweight at 7-13 years of age.
This study did not support that stress induced by bereavement during the first 6 years of life has significant influence on overweight in later childhood.
PubMed ID
23258219 View in PubMed
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Cell phone use and behavioural problems in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138765
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Jun;66(6):524-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Hozefa A Divan
Leeka Kheifets
Carsten Obel
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Division of Biostatistics, Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. kheifets@ucla.edu
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Jun;66(6):524-9
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cellular Phone - utilization
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Abstract
Potential health effects of cell phone use in children have not been adequately examined. As children are using cell phones at earlier ages, research among this group has been identified as the highest priority by both national and international organisations. The authors previously reported results from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), which looked at prenatal and postnatal exposure to cell phone use and behavioural problems at age 7 years. Exposure to cell phones prenatally, and to a lesser degree postnatally, was associated with more behavioural difficulties. The original analysis included nearly 13?000 children who reached age 7 years by November 2006.
To see if a larger, separate group of DNBC children would produce similar results after considering additional confounders, children of mothers who might better represent current users of cell phones were analysed. This 'new' dataset consisted of 28?745 children with completed Age-7 Questionnaires to December 2008.
The highest OR for behavioural problems were for children who had both prenatal and postnatal exposure to cell phones compared with children not exposed during either time period. The adjusted effect estimate was 1.5 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.7).
The findings of the previous publication were replicated in this separate group of participants demonstrating that cell phone use was associated with behavioural problems at age 7 years in children, and this association was not limited to early users of the technology. Although weaker in the new dataset, even with further control for an extended set of potential confounders, the associations remained.
PubMed ID
21138897 View in PubMed
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Childhood Bereavement and Type 1 Diabetes: a Danish National Register Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276807
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 Jan;30(1):86-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Jasveer Virk
Beate Ritz
Jiong Li
Carsten Obel
Jørn Olsen
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 Jan;30(1):86-92
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affect
Bereavement
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - physiopathology - psychology
Fathers
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers
Parent-Child Relations
Registries
Risk factors
Siblings
Stress, Psychological - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
Death of a close family member such as a parent or a sibling can cause prolonged stress and changes in the family structure that may have extensive social and health effects on a young child. The aim of this paper is to examine the rate of type 1 diabetes following bereavement due to death of a first-degree family member in early life.
We used data from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) to identify singleton births in Denmark born 1 January 1980 through 31 December 2005, n?=?1?740?245 and their next of kin. We categorised children as exposed to bereavement if they lost a mother, father or sibling from age 5 years onwards, the remaining children were considered unexposed. Children were followed until first diagnosis of diabetes, death, emigration, or 31 December 2010. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) from birth using log-linear Poisson regression models with person-years as an offset variable. Exposed children were followed up for an average of 9.1 years [standard deviation (SD) 6.7] and unexposed children were followed up for an average of 12.3 years (SD 7.3).
In our sample 94?943 children were exposed to bereavement, and 6110 cases of type 1 diabetes were identified. Bereavement was associated with an increased rate of type 1 diabetes when exposure onset began after 11 years of age (adjusted IRR 1.28, 95% confidence interval 1.08, 1.51).
We found some evidence to indicate an increase in the rate of type 1 diabetes among children exposed to bereavement when exposure occurred after 11 years of age.
PubMed ID
26444317 View in PubMed
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A confirmatory approach to examining the factor structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ): a large scale cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120411
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2013 Apr;41(3):355-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Janni Niclasen
Anne Mette Skovgaard
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Mikael Julius Sømhovd
Carsten Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Ã?ster Farimagsgade 2A, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. janni.niclasen@psy.ku.dk
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2013 Apr;41(3):355-65
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) using a Structural Confirmatory Factor Analytic approach. The Danish translation of the SDQ was distributed to 71,840 parents and teachers of 5-7 and 10-12-year-old boys and girls from four large scale cohorts. Three theoretical models were examined: 1. a model with five first order factors (i.e., hyperactivity/inattention, conduct, emotional, peer problems and prosocial), 2. a model adding two internalising and externalising second order factors to model 1, and 3. a model adding a total difficulties second order factor to model 1. Model fits were evaluated, multi-group analyses were carried out and average variance extracted (AVE) and composite reliability (CR) estimates were examined. In this general population sample, low risk sample models 1 and 2 showed similar good overall fits. Best model fits were found when two positively worded items were allowed to cross load with the prosocial scale, and cross loadings were allowed for among three sets of indicators. The analyses also revealed that model fits were slightly better for teachers than for parents and better for older children than for younger children. No convincing differences were found between boys and girls. Factor loadings were acceptable for all groups, especially for older children rated by teachers. Some emotional, peer, conduct and prosocial subscale problems were revealed for younger children rated by parents. The analyses revealed more internal consistency for older children rated by teachers than for younger children rated by parents. It is recommended that model 1 comprising five first order factors, or alternatively model 2 with additionally two internalising/externalising second order factors, should be used when employing the SDQ in low risk epidemiological samples.
PubMed ID
23008011 View in PubMed
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The Danish National Hospital Register is a valuable study base for epidemiologic research in febrile seizures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29302
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Jan;59(1):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Mogens Vestergaard
Carsten Obel
Tine Brink Henriksen
Jakob Christensen
Kreesten Meldgaard Madsen
John R Ostergaard
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
The Danish Epidemiology Science Center at the Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Aarhus, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. mv@soci.au.dk
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Jan;59(1):61-6
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Hospitalization
Hospitals
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Reference Standards
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seizures, Febrile - diagnosis - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: We examined the quality and completeness of the discharge diagnosis of febrile seizures in the Danish National Hospital Register (DNHR). METHODS: We invited all children born at the Department of Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, between January 1990 and April 1992, to participate in the study. We collected information on febrile seizures in March 2001 by mailing a questionnaire to the mothers. Reported febrile seizures were verified by telephone interviews or review of medical records. We linked the cohort to the DNHR by means of a unique civil registry number assigned to all Danish citizens at birth. Overall, 6,624 (73%) children participated in the study. RESULTS: We found that 323 (4.9%) children in the cohort had had febrile seizures, and 231 of those were registered in the DNHR (completeness: 71.5%, 95% CI: 66.3-76.4). Furthermore, we confirmed the diagnosis in 231 of 249 children registered with febrile seizures in the DNHR (predictive value of a positive registration: 92.8%, 95% CI: 88.8-95.7). CONCLUSION: The Danish National Hospital Register is a valuable tool for epidemiologic research in febrile seizures.
PubMed ID
16360562 View in PubMed
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Does children's watching of television cause attention problems? Retesting the hypothesis in a Danish cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30050
Source
Pediatrics. 2004 Nov;114(5):1372-3; author reply 1373-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004

Early Life Bereavement and Schizophrenia: A Nationwide Cohort Study in Denmark and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273491
Source
Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Jan;95(3):e2434
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Hong Liang
Jørn Olsen
Wei Yuan
Sven Cnattingus
Mogens Vestergaard
Carsten Obel
Mika Gissler
Jiong Li
Source
Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Jan;95(3):e2434
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bereavement
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We aimed to examine whether early life bereavement, as indicator of severe stress, was associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life.Based on population registers, we established a cohort of all children born in Denmark (N?=?1 686 416) and Sweden (N?=?2 563 659) from 1973 to 1997. Children were categorized as exposed if they lost a first-degree relative during the first 18 years of life. Outcome is the first diagnosis of schizophrenia as either inpatient or outpatient. Log-linear Poisson regression models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs).A total of 188,850 children (4.6%) experienced death of a first-degree relative from birth to 18 years of age. Compared with unexposed children, those exposed had overall a 39% higher risk of schizophrenia (=?1.39, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 1.32-1.47). The IRR was particularly high if the family member committed suicide (aIRR?=?2.11, 95% CI: 1.90-2.34) or died due to an injury or accident (aIRR?=?1.44, 95% CI: 1.27-1.63). The IRR of schizophrenia decreased with increasing child's age at bereavement (P?1 death during the first 18 years of life (aIRR?=?1.79, 95% CI: 1.46-2.19) had a higher risk than those with a single death (aIRR?=?1.37, 95% CI: 1.30-1.45).The study suggested that exposure to death of a first-degree relative before 18 years was associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia in later life. The complex mechanisms behind these associations remain to be elucidated.
PubMed ID
26817875 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.