Skip header and navigation
Did you mean name:"Carina berterö"? Also try berterö, or bertaro.

Refine By

30 records – page 1 of 3.

"A challenge" - healthcare professionals' experiences when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277305
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Mar;7:65-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Hanna Grundström
Preben Kjølhede
Carina Berterö
Siw Alehagen
Source
Sex Reprod Healthc. 2016 Mar;7:65-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Dysmenorrhea - diagnosis - etiology
Dyspareunia - diagnosis - etiology
Endometriosis - complications - diagnosis
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Male
Menstruation
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives
Ovulation
Pelvic Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Physicians
Professional Competence
Professional-Patient Relations
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify and describe the experiences of healthcare professionals when meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 gynecologists, six general practitioners and nine midwives working at one university hospital, one central hospital, one private gynecology clinic and five healthcare centers in south-east Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative conventional content analysis.
Three clusters were identified: the corroborating encounter, the normal variation of menstruation cycles, and the suspicion of endometriosis. The healthcare professionals tried to make a corroborating encounter by acknowledging the woman, taking time to listen, and giving an explanation for the problems. Healthcare professionals had different ways to determine what was normal as regards menstrual pain, ovulation pain and dyspareunia. They also needed to have the competence to act and react when the symptoms indicated endometriosis.
Meeting women with symptoms that might indicate endometriosis is challenging and demands a certain level of competence from healthcare professionals. Sometimes the symptoms are camouflaged as "normal" menstruation pain, making it hard to satisfy the needs of this patient group.
PubMed ID
26826048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Balancing a changed life situation: the lived experience from next of kin to persons with inoperable lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101926
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2011 Mar;28(2):82-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Karin Steinvall
Helena Johansson
Carina Berterö
Author Affiliation
Close Health Care in Western County Ostergötland, Motala Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2011 Mar;28(2):82-9
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Uncertainty
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the experiences of quality of life/life situation among those who were next of kin to persons with inoperable lung cancer. Data were collected in qualitative interviews, where 11 next of kin articulated their lived experiences, and were interpreted through interpretive phenomenology. Four themes were identified: changed life situation, experiences of uncertainty due to awareness of the ill person's changed health status, interpersonal relationships, and false hopes due to health care professionals' treatment. These four themes gave a structure presenting the essence: balancing a changed life situation. The findings of the study point out the importance of promoting support for the next of kin, because they are significantly affected by the changed life situation. There is a need to identify their needs and to support them.
PubMed ID
20826491 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comprehensive picture of palliative care at home from the people involved.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16622
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2005 Dec;9(4):315-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Gunilla Appelin
Gunilla Brobäck
Carina Berterö
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, University of Jönköping, P.O. Box 1026, SE- 551 11 Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2005 Dec;9(4):315-24
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Palliative Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify the comprehensive picture of palliative care in the home, as experienced by the people involved. The study is a secondary analysis of three phenomenological studies including six cancer patients, six next of kin and six district nurses. Data were collected in qualitative interviews using an interview guide. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. In this secondary analysis, data were analysed by hermeneutic analysis guided by Gadamer. The guiding questions during the reading were: Is there an advantage receiving palliative care at home? Is there a disadvantage receiving palliative care at home? The findings indicate that the advantages of palliative care at home is; striving for normal life, including the care in the home composed of physical care and emotional/mental care. Striving for normal life also includes emotional feelings, safety and resources and policies which regulates this activity. Disadvantages of palliative care at home are commitment, composed of adaptation and extra work, and demands, composed of frustration and uncertainty. If the people involved are to be able to manage the situation and optimize living while dying, there must be support and resources facilitating the situation.
PubMed ID
16310139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Core components in the care of immigrants with psychoses: a Delphi survey of patients, families, and health-care staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136706
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Jun;20(3):174-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Sally Hultsjö
Carina Berterö
Hans Arvidsson
Katarina Hjelm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden. sallyhultsjo@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Jun;20(3):174-84
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology
Delphi Technique
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patients - psychology
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to identify core components in the care of immigrants with psychosis in Sweden. Experts (n=43) from different perspectives (immigrants, families, and health-care staff) were assembled and used to score the importance of statements regarding components in the care for a person with psychosis in three questionnaire rounds. After each round, the opinions were consolidated and compared to identify whether consensus was reached. Consensus was reached about the importance of being treated on equal terms, regardless of country of birth. Staff interest and respect, shown in different ways of understanding, was valued. Consensus could not be reached on approximately half of the statements, of which four tended to be ranked towards unimportant. Those included that staff should have specific cultural knowledge or that the patient should be allowed to decide whether to be cared for by male or female staff. Nor was it regarded as important to identify a person's religious or ethnic background. The results illustrate the importance of fundamental psychiatric nursing, which should enable nurses to identify and meet the basic needs of all patients, regardless of country of origin. Areas for which consensus was not reached illustrate a future challenge for health-care staff to identify situations when cultural clashes could appear. Staff should have strategies to accomplish cultural negotiations to build an effective treatment alliance with the patient, as well as the family, to meet individual needs.
PubMed ID
21352448 View in PubMed
Less detail

District nurses' perceptions of palliative care in the home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18779
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2002 Nov-Dec;19(6):387-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
Carina Berterö
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Sweden.
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2002 Nov-Dec;19(6):387-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nurses - psychology
Palliative Care
Public health nursing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Workload
Abstract
Palliative care describes a caring philosophy. Originally, palliative care referred exclusively to the care of dying cancer patients, but over time has expanded to include mitigating care of all dying people whatever the diagnosis. The purpose of this paper is to explore the meaning of palliative care according to the experience of district nurses in Sweden. Six district nurses were interviewed, and the transcripts were analyzed using Giorgi's phenomenology. The essence of the caring philosophy for the nurses in the study was identified as commitment, underscored by four themes: challenge, control, frustration, and relationships. These findings indicate that district nurses must be offered resources and education in order to be able to fulfill their commitment, i.e., to supply good palliative care.
PubMed ID
12442973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Documentation in palliative care: nursing documentation in a palliative care unit--a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159625
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2008 Feb-Mar;25(1):45-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Inger Gunhardsson
Anna Svensson
Carina Berterö
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden.
Source
Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2008 Feb-Mar;25(1):45-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Documentation
Humans
Needs Assessment
Nursing Records - statistics & numerical data
Pain Management
Palliative Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient Care Planning
Pilot Projects
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Sweden
Abstract
Palliative care seeks to enhance quality of life in the face of death by addressing the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of patients with advanced disease. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether palliative patients' needs, nursing actions, and evaluation can be identified in the nursing documentation. Data consisted of reviews of patients' case records in a palliative care unit. Data were analyzed using content analysis and counting frequency of keywords used from the Well-being Integrity Prevention and Safety (VIPS) model, followed by an inductive analysis of the case record documentation aiming to identify palliative care components. The result shows that the documentation revealed physical care, especially pain, more frequently than other needs. Nursing documentation focuses on identification more than on nursing actions and evaluation.
PubMed ID
18160546 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does one's sense of coherence change after an acute myocardial infarction? A two-year longitudinal study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134399
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2011 Jun;13(2):156-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Eva Bergman
Dan Malm
Carina Berterö
Jan-Erik Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2011 Jun;13(2):156-63
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - nursing - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess changes in the sense of coherence of patients who had suffered their first myocardial infarction. Out of 100 patients at the start of the study, these changes were evaluated in 66 men and 18 women aged 36-70 years. Generally, the sense of coherence was found to be stable among the whole group, but there were significant individual variations in its development in some of the participants over the following years. Even the individuals with an initally high sense of coherence could experience a decrease in its level. The changes that were found in the men can be explained by their marital status, level of treatment satisfaction, disease perception/quality of life, physical limitation, and alcohol intake and/or tobacco use at the baseline. An unexpected finding was that the single men with an initially high sense of coherence experienced a decreased level over time. In order to maintain or increase patients' sense of coherence, it is important for nurses to help them identify their risk factors and to provide conditions for individualized cardiac rehabilitation in order to avoid another myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
21592266 View in PubMed
Less detail

Ethical values in caring encounters on a geriatric ward from the next of kin's perspective: an interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145392
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2010 Feb;16(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Lise-Lotte Jonasson
Per-Erik Liss
Björn Westerlind
Carina Berterö
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, University of Jönköping, SE-551 11Jönköping, Sweden. lise-lotte.jonasson@hhj.hj.se
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2010 Feb;16(1):20-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Empathy
Family - psychology
Geriatric Nursing - ethics - organization & administration
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations - ethics
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - ethics - organization & administration - psychology
Principle-Based Ethics
Professional Competence
Professional-Family Relations - ethics
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify and describe the governing ethical values that next of kin experience in interaction with nurses who care for elderly patients at a geriatric clinic. Interviews with 14 next of kin were conducted and data were analysed by constant comparative analysis. Four categories were identified: receiving, showing respect, facilitating participation and showing professionalism. These categories formed the basis of the core category: 'Being amenable', a concept identified in the next of kin's description of the ethical values that they and the elderly patients perceive in the caring encounter. Being amenable means that the nurses are guided by ethical values; taking into account the elderly patient and the next of kin. Nurses' focusing on elderly patients' well-being as a final criterion affects the next of kin and their experience of this fundamental condition for high-quality care seems to be fulfilled.
PubMed ID
20158544 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fathers' experiences after having a child: sexuality becomes tailored according to circumstances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97919
Source
Midwifery. 2010 Feb 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-2010
Author
Ruth Macadam
Elisabeth Huuva
Carina Berterö
Author Affiliation
Women's Primary Healthcare Clinic, Orebro, Sweden.
Source
Midwifery. 2010 Feb 22;
Date
Feb-22-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: to identify and describe men's experiences of sexuality after having a child. DESIGN: a qualitative study using an interpretative phenomenological approach for analysing in-depth interviews. PARTICIPANTS: purposeful sampling was used. 12 men were interviewed six to 13 months after having a child. Informants were men who became fathers for the first time or had already fathered a child. SETTING: a mid-sized town located in the centre of Sweden. FINDINGS: four themes became apparent; a new way of closeness due to non-existing sexuality immediately after birth, an expression of sexuality influenced by the consequences of caring for a child, the expression of love and consideration taking priority over sexual activities, and the father's expression of sexuality being limited by the lack of reciprocation from the partner. KEY CONCLUSIONS: after having a child, the expression of sexuality became subjective to the change in circumstances. Sexuality itself was not experienced any differently, but the expression of sexuality for the fathers was modified depending on how the circumstances presented themselves. Sexuality was extended to different avenues of expression where a sense of belonging evolved and a display of love and affection preceded sexual activities. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: it is important that health care professionals are aware that as sexuality can have various avenues of expression after having a child it is important to not only focus on providing information regarding sexual activities. Fathers should be involved in discussions about possible circumstances affecting sexuality to be able to prepare accordingly.
PubMed ID
20181417 View in PubMed
Less detail

First-time fathers' experiences of normal childbirth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282821
Source
Midwifery. 2016 Sep;40:26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Anna Ledenfors
Carina Berterö
Source
Midwifery. 2016 Sep;40:26-31
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Parturition - psychology
Paternal Behavior - psychology
Pregnancy
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
To identify and describe first-time fathers' experiences of normal childbirth.
A qualitative interview study using a thematic analysis for analysing the transcripts.
purposeful sampling was used. Eight men were interviewed two to six months after experiencing childbirth. Participants were men who had become fathers for the first time.
A county located in the middle of Sweden covering both urban and rural areas.
The analysis resulted in one major theme - a transformative experience - with four sub-themes: preparing for childbirth, feeling vulnerable in a new situation, being confirmed as part of a unit, and meeting their child for the first time.
The findings indicate that the needs of prospective fathers should be given more recognition during childbirth. The findings also show that the midwife is an important person for prospective fathers, both before and during the birth.
The findings of the study show what affects first-time fathers' experiences of childbirth. By listening to fathers and recognising them as part of a unit with the woman giving birth, midwifes can support them and increase their participation. Thereby, they can find their role in an unfamiliar situation and thus have a positive experience of childbirth.
PubMed ID
27428095 View in PubMed
Less detail

30 records – page 1 of 3.