Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Documenting natural recovery in American-Indian drinking behavior: a coding scheme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5529
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jul;65(4):428-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Marjorie Bezdek
Calvin Croy
Paul Spicer
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Mail Stop F800, P.O. Box 6508, Aurora, Colorado 80045-0508, USA. Marjorie.Bezdek@uchsc.edu
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2004 Jul;65(4):428-33
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Documentation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Forms and Records Control - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This report describes a coding scheme developed to analyze how some American Indians changed their drinking behavior and explores the contributions of this approach to our understanding of natural recovery in American-Indian communities. METHOD: We analyzed the responses to two open-ended questions about drinking in an epidemiological survey. The first question asked what helped respondents to quit or cut down on their drinking; the second asked respondents what they did instead of drinking when they wanted to drink. Codes were developed using anthropological analyses of content and then refined through analyses of frequencies and attempts to establish reliability. The frequencies of these codes were then examined by gender, age and current drinking status. RESULTS: Reliability was attained for the coding of responses to both questions. Their content reflects salient themes in the literature on natural recovery. The distribution of these codes across gender, age and current drinking status reveals interesting insights into what prompts and supports quitting and change for different members of these American-Indian communities, especially for women, older respondents and those who abstain from alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: This approach points the way to a consideration of a broad set of factors related to changes in drinking behavior in American-Indian populations that can be applied in future studies, both in American-Indian communities and, potentially, in other populations as well.
PubMed ID
15376816 View in PubMed
Less detail

National Overview of Medication-Assisted Treatment for American Indians and Alaska Natives With Substance Use Disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292497
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2017 Nov 01; 68(11):1136-1143
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-01-2017
Author
Traci Rieckmann
Laurie Moore
Calvin Croy
Gregory A Aarons
Douglas K Novins
Author Affiliation
Dr. Rieckmann is with the School of Public Health, Oregon Health and Science University-Portland State University, Portland. Ms. Moore, Dr. Croy, and Dr. Novins are with the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, University of Colorado, Aurora. Dr. Novins is also with the Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado, Aurora. Dr. Aarons is with the Department of Psychiatry and the Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, University of California, San Diego.
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2017 Nov 01; 68(11):1136-1143
Date
Nov-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska Natives - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - statistics & numerical data
Substance-Related Disorders - drug therapy
United States
Abstract
American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) experience higher rates of substance use disorders and less access to high-quality care compared with other racial-ethnic groups. The objective of this study was to better understand the use of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) of substance use disorders for AI/ANs and barriers to broader implementation.
Representatives of 192 substance abuse treatment programs completed a survey about their use of MAT. On the basis of implementation science frameworks, the authors examined survey items about program structure, workforce, and other services provided in order to develop logistic regression models that explored significant associations between workforce and program characteristics and use of MAT.
Of the 192 programs, 28% reported implementing MAT. Multivariate logistic regression models indicated that programs with staff that perceived MAT to be consistent with their program's treatment approach and philosophy and programs reporting that MAT fit with staff expertise and training were more likely to implement MAT. Programs with nurses on staff and those reporting a perceived gap in the use of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) were less likely to implement MAT.
Low rates of MAT implementation suggest racial disparities in access to MAT among AI/ANs, a population with historically high rates of substance use disorders. Study findings also highlight the important role of treatment culture and organizational fit in the implementation of MAT in treatment programs serving AI/AN populations. Results also speak to the importance of adapting existing EBTs in a culturally competent way to best serve the needs of the AI/AN community.
PubMed ID
28712352 View in PubMed
Less detail

The relationship between patterns of alcohol use and mental and physical health disorders in two American Indian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5516
Source
Addiction. 2006 Jan;101(1):69-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Joan O'Connell
Douglas K Novins
Janette Beals
Calvin Croy
Anna E Barón
Paul Spicer
Dedra Buchwald
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO 80045-0508, USA. Joan.OConnell@uchsc.edu
Source
Addiction. 2006 Jan;101(1):69-83
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
AIMS: First, define alcohol use categories among two reservation-based American Indian (AI) populations based on the relationship between alcohol consumption and dependence. Secondly, examine associations between the alcohol use categories and other indicators of health status. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: Epidemiological data on 1287 AIs aged 18-57 years who consumed alcohol during the past year. CHAID tree analysis, a hierarchical partitioning method, was used to analyze alcohol quantity (highest number of drinks consumed during 1 day) and frequency (number of days drank during the past month) data to define quantity-frequency categories distinguished by differing rates of alcohol dependence. Multivariate analyses assessed relationships between the alcohol use categories thus identified and a number of health outcomes. FINDINGS: People who reported drinking 12 or more drinks during 1 day and more than 4 days a month had the highest prevalence of alcohol dependence. Among the males who drank > 18 drinks the prevalence was 42.12% and among females who drank 12 or more drinks, 44.58%. The prevalence among males who drank > 18 drinks yet drank less frequently was also high (24.06%). Although findings differed by gender, drinkers in the highest risk category for alcohol dependence were most likely to report drug use disorders, mood/anxiety disorders, alcohol-related physical disorders and lower quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: The quantity thresholds defined to identify AIs at highest risk for alcohol dependence in this study differed by gender and were higher than typically reported for non-AIs. They are consistent with previous findings regarding the pattern of high-quantity, low-frequency alcohol consumption among AIs residing on reservations.
PubMed ID
16393193 View in PubMed
Less detail