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51 records – page 1 of 6.

[ADDH/DAMP--some reflections after the dispute is calming down]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32168
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1958-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2001
Author
C. Sundelin
D. Lagerberg
Author Affiliation
claes.sundelin@ped.uas.lul.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Apr 18;98(16):1958-61
Date
Apr-18-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - classification - diagnosis - therapy
Child
Child Psychiatry
Concept Formation
Humans
Sweden
Terminology
PubMed ID
11370417 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of speech and language skills in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36940
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1992;97(3):229-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. Jennische
G. Sedin
B. Johnsen
C. Sundelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1992;97(3):229-50
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Language
Female
Humans
Interviews
Language Tests
Male
Parents
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Speech
Abstract
A speech and language assessment procedure was developed to study different aspects of speech and language skills in children 6.5 years old who had needed intensive care in the neonatal period. It was required that the procedure could be carried out at one examination session and that it should characterize a broad spectrum of language skills and permit detection of deviations in language development. The assessment comprises three parts. Part A is an evaluation of the child's spontaneous speech during a 10- to 15-minute conversation between the child and the assessor. Eight different variables are assessed, and an overview of the child's conversational behaviour is obtained. Part B is an assessment of speech and language skills. A set procedure is used to assess auditory discrimination, interaction between auditory and speech motor capacity, different comprehension functions, vocabulary and word fluency. Some motor tasks are included to elucidate the relationship between speech and non-linguistic fine motor activity. Part C is an interview with the parents. A control group of 40 children was tested. The assessment protocol is now being applied for follow-up examination of children who have needed neonatal intensive care at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
PubMed ID
1300675 View in PubMed
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[Breast feeding is not a decree from the National Board of Health and Welfare]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61908
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Sep 24;94(39):3379
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-24-1997
Author
N. Rehnqvist
P G Swartling
Y. Hofvander
C. Sundelin
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Sep 24;94(39):3379
Date
Sep-24-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Female
Guidelines
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
9379803 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can severe language disability be identified in three-year-olds? Evaluation of a routine screening procedure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32940
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2000 Jan;89(1):94-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2000
Author
M. Westerlund
C. Sundelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Children's Hospital, Sweden. Monica.Westerlund@pediatrik.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2000 Jan;89(1):94-100
Date
Jan-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Diagnosis, Differential
Evaluation Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Language Development Disorders - diagnosis
Mass Screening - methods
Predictive value of tests
Referral and Consultation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Abstract
This study evaluates the predictability of a new language screening procedure in 3-y-olds. It is used in several Child Health Centres (CHC) in Sweden and has the character of a field study involving more than 60 CHC nurses. The main questions concern the (i) development in 3-y-olds assessed as severely language delayed and (ii) whether there are any earlier unknown severely disabled children identified at 4 y of age. Ninety-six percent of the original study population participated in the follow-up. The calculations are based on results from 2237 children. A well-established screening routine, which has been shown capable of predicting the risk of not being able to follow expected schooling, and case records were used as an acceptable proxy outcome measure, pending a better gold standard. In the group of severely disabled 3-y-olds, sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values were 86, 99 and 43%, respectively. Finally, three false-negatives were identified. In light of the present results, continued application of the 3-y screening is discussed.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2000 Jan;89(1):7-810677048
PubMed ID
10677066 View in PubMed
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[Care practice in different hospitals for healthy neonates with low birth weight]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60954
Source
Lakartidningen. 1974 Oct 3;71(40):3771-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1974

Child-environment supervisors--a new strategy for prevention of childhood accidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41513
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:102-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
L H Gustafsson
A. Hammarström
K. Linder
E. Stjernberg
C. Sundelin
C. Thulin
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand Suppl. 1979;275:102-7
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child, Preschool
Environment Design
Humans
Methods
Parents
Safety
Sweden
Abstract
This paper is a provisional report from an ongoing field experiment in Uppsala, Sweden, with the aim to reduce the number of serious childhood accidents. Groups of parents have been systematically trained to function as child-environment supervisors. The experiences have been very positive so far. The child-environment supervisors have proved to possess good knowledge about how to prevent accidents. A large number of hazards have been detected and successfully eliminated. The groups are now taking an active part in the planning of new housing estates. The findings also indicate that the Child Health Organization should be able to play a more active role in the work of environmental improvement for the safety of children. A suggestion for a collective strategy for such activity has been worked out.
PubMed ID
291281 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child health records as a database for clinical practice, research and community planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37305
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1991 Jan;16(1):15-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1991
Author
E. Hagelin
D. Lagerberg
C. Sundelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1991 Jan;16(1):15-23
Date
Jan-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - organization & administration - utilization
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual - standards
Feasibility Studies
Health planning
Humans
Medical Records - standards
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
In considering health information systems, great hope is attached to the use of child health records as a data source for research and community planning. In order to test the completeness of child health records data and their agreement with other sources, information about living conditions, use of medical services and health problems in preschool children were studied in 707 child health centres' records. The results show a considerable number of deficiencies in the system which could, to a certain extent, be remedied by improved instructions to the staff. Health problems in the area of child care also need to be fully defined.
PubMed ID
2005285 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Child health service as a specialty]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36677
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jun 10;89(24):2172
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-1992
Author
C. Sundelin
Author Affiliation
Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jun 10;89(24):2172
Date
Jun-10-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Child, Preschool
Humans
Specialties, Nursing - manpower - organization & administration - trends
Sweden
PubMed ID
1630243 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child health services in transition: II. Mothers' perceptions of 18-month-old children in the light of socio-economic status and some subjective factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29591
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2005 Mar;94(3):337-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
D. Lagerberg
M. Magnusson
C. Sundelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Section for Paediatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. dagmar.lagerberg@kbh.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2005 Mar;94(3):337-44
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Models, Psychological
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Efficacy
Social Class
Social Isolation
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIMS: To analyse mothers' self-assessed quality of interaction with their children and their opinions about child difficulty with respect to socio-economic status and subjective factors: postnatal depression, social isolation, sense of coherence and locus of control. METHODS AND MATERIAL: A comprehensive questionnaire was completed by 1039 mothers of 18-mo-old children participating in the baseline measurements of a Swedish multicentre study developing and testing a new psychosocial model for the child health services. RESULTS: All subjective factors, including the number of factors, showed significant associations with perceived interaction and difficultness. Effect sizes of subjective factors ranged from about 0.3 to 1 SD for interaction, and from about 0.2 to 0.8 SD for difficultness. As for difficultness, effect sizes were larger for boys. There were no associations between high socio-economic status and high-quality interaction or low child difficultness: the few significant differences in fact favoured low-status children. CONCLUSION: The results provided some contradictory findings to the well-known association between high socio-economic status and favourable outcome. This result is of practical relevance for interventions: supportive programmes cannot be limited to areas and families of low socio-economic status. Positive effects may ensue if subjective factors like those studied here can be promoted among parents and children through the child health services.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2005 Mar;94(3):265-716028642
PubMed ID
16028653 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.