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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Assessing disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Use of a Swedish version of the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14567
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1988;17(4):263-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
C. Ekdahl
K. Eberhardt
S I Andersson
B. Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Research in Primary Health Care, Health Sciences Center of Lund University, Dalby, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 1988;17(4):263-71
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - physiopathology
Disability Evaluation
Evaluation Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The validity and reliability under Swedish conditions of a translated and slightly modified version of the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), referred to here as the ADL questionnaire, was studied. Sixty-four patients with definite/classical rheumatoid arthritis (RA) participated in the major part of the investigation. In addition, inter-observer reliability was studied in the testing of 15 other patients with RA. The questionnaire was filled in by the patients twice (ADL Tests 1 and 2) with a one-week interval between. A physiotherapist or occupational therapist also assessed each of the patients on a sample of ADL functions (ADL Test 3). Joint mobility, grip-strength, pain, Ritchie index and ESR were likewise checked. Results indicated inter-observer reliability to be high for the ADL (r(S) = 0.98), for joint mobility (r(S) = 0.86), and for the Ritchie index (r(S) = 0.83). The test-retest reliability for the ADL questionnaire which the patients filled in (Tests 1 and 2) was high r(S) = 0.91. Results of the ADL questionnaires the patients completed were found to correlate fairly closely with the observations of the therapists, r(S) = 0.71. The validity of the scoring system was found to be sufficient, using Ward's cluster analysis for comparing the original HAQ scores with scores on all the questions included in the questionnaire. Thus, the translated and somewhat modified version of the ADL questionnaire studied here appears to possess a high degree of reliability and validity in assessing patients with RA.
PubMed ID
3187457 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer patients' experiences of lymphoedema.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18617
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Mar;17(1):35-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
K. Johansson
H. Holmström
I. Nilsson
C. Ingvar
M. Albertsson
C. Ekdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Lund University, Sweden. karin.johansson@skane.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Mar;17(1):35-42
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - complications
Emotions
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Lymphedema - etiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient care team
Problem Solving
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Sweden
Women - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore employed women's experiences of light or moderate arm lymphoedema following breast cancer treatment in order to gain a deeper understanding of this phenomenon. Twelve women took part in a semistructured interview. A qualitative method with a phenomenological approach was applied to analyse data. In order to integrate the experiences in the everyday life of the women, a critical incident method was used. The findings indicate that there are many different practical and psychosocial problems related to arm lymphoedema. Three main themes were common to all the women. These themes were: (i) Attitudes from people in their surroundings, including reactions to the problem from other people and reactions from the women on the attitudes of other people. (ii) Discovery and understanding of oedema as a chronic disease and its treatment. (iii) Coping, including both problem-focused and emotion-focused strategies. The problems integrated in daily life were of low frequency but of considerable importance to the women. In conclusion, it is of great importance that health care professionals should be aware of and have knowledge about these problems. The women's needs for expressing their experiences of arm lymphoedema may be encouraged at the time of discovery and then regularly as long as the women seek care. Efforts may be made to strengthen the women's coping skills, eventually in a multidisciplinary approach. The interaction skills of health care professionals are probably of great importance in strengthening the resources of the women leading to a positive outcome.
PubMed ID
12581293 View in PubMed
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Early planning of care and rehabilitation after amputation for vascular disease by means of Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190036
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(4):234-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
Y. Hermodsson
C. Ekdahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Helsingborg Hospital, Helsingborg, Sweden. ylva.hermodsson@nvs.ltskane.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1999;13(4):234-9
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Amputation
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Care Planning
Sweden
Vascular Diseases - rehabilitation - surgery
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate whether the Swedish version of the Katz Index of ADL (Activities of Daily Living), on days 5-7 after amputation for vascular disease, had predictive value regarding length of hospital stay, discharge to the patient's own home or death within 1 month. Patients who had recently undergone primary unilateral trans-tibial amputation, living in their own homes before the amputation, were included. Fifty-two patients with a median age of 78 years (60-92) were assessed with the Katz Index of ADL. Results revealed that of the 10 (20%) patients discharged to their own homes within 1 month, only 2 belonged to grades A-C, that is, were independent in the majority of functions in personal ADL. Within 6 months 62% were discharged to their own homes. Eighty-four percent of the patients in grades D-G, i.e. most dependent on others, were still at the hospital or dead 1 month post-operatively. All the patients who belonged to grades A-F survived the first month post-operatively. The Katz Index of ADL had predictive value regarding early outcome in terms of length of hospital stay, discharge to the patient's own home or death within 1 month, and positive predictive value regarding survival the first month post-operatively.
PubMed ID
12032920 View in PubMed
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The effect of McKenzie therapy as compared with that of intensive strengthening training for the treatment of patients with subacute or chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71586
Source
Spine. 2002 Aug 15;27(16):1702-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2002
Author
Tom Petersen
Peter Kryger
C. Ekdahl
Steen Olsen
Soren Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Back Center of Copenhagen, Denmark. tompet@mail.tele.dk
Source
Spine. 2002 Aug 15;27(16):1702-9
Date
Aug-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Demography
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Low Back Pain - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapy Modalities - methods - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
STUDY DESIGN: A randomized controlled comparative trial with an 8-month follow-up period was conducted. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of the McKenzie treatment method with that of intensive dynamic strengthening training in patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Randomized studies indicate that the efficacy of the McKenzie method in the treatment of patients with acute or subacute low back pain is debatable. Currently, no randomized studies examining the effects of this method for patients with chronic low back pain have been published. METHODS: For this study, 260 consecutive patients with low back pain and at least 8 weeks duration of symptoms (85% of the patients had more than 3 months duration of symptoms) were randomized into two groups: Group A was treated with the McKenzie method (n = 132), and Group B was treated with intensive dynamic strengthening training (n = 128). The treatment period for both groups was 8 weeks at an outpatient clinic, followed by 2 months of self-training at home. Treatment results were recorded at the end of the treatment period at the clinic, then 2 and 8 months after. In both groups, 30% of the patients were lost to follow-up evaluation. An intention-to-treat analysis of the main effect variables, disability, and pain was performed for all the patients included in the study. A supplementary analysis of the 180 patients who completed the full treatment program also was undertaken. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analysis showed a tendency toward a difference in reduction of disability in favor of the McKenzie group at the 2-month follow-up assessment (P = 0.04), but no differences at the end of treatment and at the 8-month follow-up evaluation. No differences in reduction of pain were observed at any time between the groups. The supplementary analysis of the patients who had completed the full intervention showed a tendency toward a difference in favor of the McKenzie method in reduction of pain at the end of treatment (P = 0.02). This difference reached statistical significance at the 2-month follow-up assessment (P = 0.01), but no difference was found after 8 months. The supplementary analysis showed no differences between the groups with regard to reduction of disability. CONCLUSION: The McKenzie method and intensive dynamic strengthening training seem to be equally effective in the treatment of patients with subacute or chronic low back pain.
Notes
Comment In: Spine. 2002 Aug 15;27(16):170912195059
PubMed ID
12195058 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life in primary Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia compared to normal population data using SF-36.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14121
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2000;29(1):20-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
B. Strömbeck
C. Ekdahl
R. Manthorpe
I. Wikström
L. Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2000;29(1):20-8
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - psychology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Fibromyalgia - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sjogren's Syndrome - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the health-related quality of life in women with primary Sjogren's syndrome (prim SS) and compare with normative data and the health-related quality of life in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and women with fibromyalgia. METHODS: A questionnaire including the MOS Short-Form 36 (SF-36) was completed by 42 prim SS women, 59 RA women, and 44 women with fibromyalgia. RESULTS: All three patient groups experienced a decreased quality of life level ranging from 5 to 65 % in all SF-36 scales compared to normative data. Differences between groups were seen in 7 of the 8 scales (p
PubMed ID
10722254 View in PubMed
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Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS)--validation of a Swedish version.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14185
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1998 Dec;8(6):439-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
E M Roos
H P Roos
C. Ekdahl
L S Lohmander
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Lund University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1998 Dec;8(6):439-48
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries
Cartilage, Articular - injuries
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Knee Injuries - complications - therapy
Menisci, Tibial - injuries
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - etiology
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) is a self-administered instrument measuring outcome after knee injury at impairment, disability, and handicap level in five subscales. Reliability, validity, and responsiveness of a Swedish version was assessed in 142 patients who underwent arthroscopy because of injury to the menisci, anterior cruciate ligament, or cartilage of the knee. The clinimetric properties were found to be good and comparable to the American version of the KOOS. Comparison to the Short Form-36 and the Lysholm knee scoring scale revealed expected correlations and construct validity. Item by item, symptoms and functional limitations were compared between diagnostic groups. High responsiveness was found three months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for all subscales but Activities of Daily Living.
PubMed ID
9863983 View in PubMed
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Motivation as a predictor of changes in quality of life and working ability in multidisciplinary rehabilitation. A two-year follow-up of a prospective controlled study in patients with prolonged musculoskeletal disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72063
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2000 Oct 15;22(15):639-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2000
Author
B. Grahn
C. Ekdahl
L. Borgquist
Author Affiliation
Kronoberg Occupational Rehabilitation Service, Växjö, Sweden. birgitta.grahn@1tkronoberg.se
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2000 Oct 15;22(15):639-54
Date
Oct-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Motivation
Musculoskeletal Diseases - psychology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Psychophysiology
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the two year outcome of multidisciplinary rehabilitation for patients with prolonged musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), in terms of health-related quality of life (HRQL) and working ability. In addition, predictors of outcome were examined. METHODS: The rehabilitation group and the matched control group comprised 122 and 114 patients respectively. Baseline data were compared with two year follow-up data within and between the groups. The variables that were measured were: HRQL (Nottingham Health Profile), motivation, body awareness, pain, pain-related medicine consumption, psychosomatic symptoms, working environment and working ability. RESULTS: Variables which improved significantly for the rehabilitation group compared with the control group were: HRQL (p = 0.049), emotional reactions (p = 0.043), pain related to movements (p = 0.028) and need for pain-related medicines (p = 0.009). Multivariate regression analysis including all patients revealed that motivation was a predictor of change in HRQL (p = 0.001) and working ability (p
PubMed ID
11087060 View in PubMed
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Muscle function of the lower extremities in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthrosis. A descriptive study of patients in a primary health care district.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14540
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1989;42(10):947-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
C. Ekdahl
S I Andersson
B. Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, Dalby, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1989;42(10):947-54
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Leg - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Muscle Contraction
Osteoarthritis - physiopathology
Physical Endurance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Thirty-six patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 30 patients with cox- or gonarthrosis (OA), and a control group of 40 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) were studied with the aim of analyzing and comparing patient experienced muscular problems of muscle-strength analyzing and comparing patient experienced muscular problems of muscle-strength, endurance and balance/coordination with muscle function as assessed by standardized tests. The results indicated that patient-experienced problems of muscle function of the lower extremities were frequent in both the RA and the OA groups (about 80%) compared to the DM group (10%). Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAs) on experienced and tested muscle strength, endurance and balance/coordination, revealed a significant RA-OA difference (p less than 0.05). Separate analyses of variance (ANOVAs) indicated OA patients to show decreased tested endurance compared with the RA group. There was no significant RA-OA difference as to pain. Results provide evidence for considering muscle function of the lower extremities in therapeutic programs for RA and OA within primary health care.
PubMed ID
2809654 View in PubMed
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No significant differences between intervention programmes on neck, shoulder and low back pain: a prospective randomized study among home-care personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49866
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Jul;33(4):170-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
E. Horneij
B. Hemborg
I. Jensen
C. Ekdahl
Author Affiliation
Hälsoinvest, Ramlösa Clinic, Sweden. eva.horneij@swipnet.se
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Jul;33(4):170-6
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Therapy
Female
Home Health Aides - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Low Back Pain - therapy
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - therapy
Nurses' Aides - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - therapy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Shoulder Pain - therapy
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The effects of two different prevention programmes on: (1) reported neck, shoulder and back pain, (2) perceived physical exertion at work and perceived work-related psychosocial factors, were evaluated by questionnaires after 12 and 18 months. Female nursing aides and assistant nurses (n = 282) working in the home-care services, were randomly assigned to one of three groups for: (1) individually designed physical training programme, (2) work-place stress management, (3) control group. Results revealed no significant differences between the three groups. However, improvements in low back pain were registered within both intervention groups for up to 18 months. Perceived physical exertion at work was reduced in the physical training group. Improvements in neck and shoulder pain did not differ within the three groups. Dissatisfaction with work-related, psychosocial factors was generally increased in all groups. As the aetiology of neck, shoulder and back disorders is multifactorial, a combination of the two intervention programmes might be preferable and should be further studied.
PubMed ID
11506215 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and predictors of falls and dizziness in people younger and older than 80 years of age--a longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120462
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Jan-Feb;56(1):160-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
U. Olsson Möller
P. Midlöv
J. Kristensson
C. Ekdahl
J. Berglund
U. Jakobsson
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. ulrika.olsson_moller@med.lu.se
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2013 Jan-Feb;56(1):160-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition
Dizziness - complications - epidemiology
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives were to investigate the prevalence and predictors for falls and dizziness among people younger and older than 80 years of age. The sample was drawn from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care (SNAC) and comprised 973 and 1273 subjects with data on the occurrence of falls and dizziness respectively at baseline. Follow-ups were made after 3- and 6-years. Data included socio-demographics, physical function, health complaints, cognition, quality of life and medications. The prevalence of falls was 16.5% in those under aged 80 and 31.7% in those 80+ years while dizziness was reported by 17.8% and 31.0% respectively. Predictors for falls in those under aged 80 were neuroleptics, dependency in personal activities of daily living (PADL), a history of falling, vision impairment and higher age, and in those 80+ years a history of falling, dependency in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), fatigue and higher age. Factors predicting dizziness in those under aged 80 were a history of dizziness, feeling nervous and reduced grip strength and in those 80+ years a history of dizziness and of falling. Predictors for falls and dizziness differed according to age. Specific factors were identified in those under aged 80. In those 80+ years more general factors were identified implying the need for a comprehensive investigation to prevent falls. This longitudinal study also showed that falling and dizziness in many older people are persistent and therefore should be treated as chronic conditions.
PubMed ID
22999306 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.