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Decreased incidence of graft-versus-host disease in bone marrow transplantation recipients treated with a combination of cyclosporine and methotrexate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232967
Source
Transplant Proc. 1988 Jun;20(3):494-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1988

Pediatric Organ Transplantation and Risk of Premalignant and Malignant Tumors in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99736
Source
Am J Transplant. 2011 Jan;11(1):146-151
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
J F Simard
E. Baecklund
A. Kinch
C. Brattström
A. Ingvar
D. Molin
J. Adami
P. Fernberg
H. Wilczek
A. Ekbom
K E Smedby
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Rheumatology Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Infectious Diseases, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Department of Transplantation Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Section of Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Transplant. 2011 Jan;11(1):146-151
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Increased cancer risks are well documented in adult organ transplant recipients. However, the spectrum of malignancies and risk in the pediatric organ transplant population are less well described. We identified all solid organ transplanted patients aged
PubMed ID
21199354 View in PubMed
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Rescue therapy with tacrolimus (FK 506) in renal transplant recipients--a Scandinavian multicenter analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34517
Source
Transpl Int. 1997;10(1):13-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
M. Felldin
L. Bäckman
C. Brattström
O. Bentdal
K. Nordal
K. Claesson
N H Persson
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Transpl Int. 1997;10(1):13-8
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Graft Rejection - prevention & control
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - administration & dosage
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Tacrolimus - administration & dosage
Transplantation, Homologous
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
All renal allograft recipients (n = 32) in Sweden and Norway who were converted from cyclosporin (CyA)-based immunosuppression to FK 506 (tacrolimus) between October 1992 and June 1995 were analyzed retrospectively. The reasons for conversion were acute refractory rejection (n = 21), chronic rejection (n = 4), and suspected CyA toxicity (n = 6); one patient was converted for psychological reasons. The mean time from transplantation to conversion was 29 (range 1-243) weeks and there was a mean follow-up of 46 (2-143) weeks. Overall graft survival was 59%, with graft survival 52% in patients converted because of acute rejection, 50% in patients converted because of chronic rejection, and 83% in patients converted because of CyA toxicity. There was no significant correlation between preconversion serum creatinine and outcome. Seventy-two percent of the patients had significant side effects during FK 506 treatment, the most frequent ones being neurological and gastrointestinal symptoms. These improved after dose reduction. Two patients became overimmunosuppressed and developed lymphoma. One patient died of the primary kidney disease, hemolytic uraemic syndrome. We conclude that FK 506 therapy is able to salvage kidneys with acute refractory rejection and that it is an alternative in patients with CyA toxicity. However, the risk of overimmunosuppression must be considered.
PubMed ID
9002146 View in PubMed
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Sirolimus experience at a Swedish transplantation center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185438
Source
Transplant Proc. 2003 May;35(3 Suppl):84S-88S
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
H E Wilczek
C. Brattström
Author Affiliation
Department of Transplantation Surgery, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Transplant Proc. 2003 May;35(3 Suppl):84S-88S
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Trials as Topic
Diltiazem - pharmacokinetics
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - pharmacokinetics - therapeutic use
Kidney Transplantation - immunology - physiology
Reference Values
Registries
Sirolimus - pharmacokinetics - therapeutic use
Sweden
Abstract
Sirolimus is an interesting drug due to its original mechanism of action and because it seems to lack the nephrotoxicity associated with calcineurin inhibitors. During the past 10 years, sirolimus has undergone several clinical trials. Beginning with phase I studies, our first patient given sirolimus was enrolled in 1993, after which we participated in sirolimus phase II trials and finally conducted the large phase III study that led to registration of sirolimus in the European Union (EU) in 2001. Altogether, 111 patients have been treated with sirolimus in our department. Initially, we participated in clinical trials evaluating sirolimus in combination with cyclosporine, but later we focused on studies using sirolimus as base therapy. We found sirolimus to be an effective immunosuppressant lacking several of the disturbing side effects associated with calcineurin inhibitors. It has a high antirejection efficacy and yields excellent survival results, with better renal function than that achieved by calcineurin inhibitors. The main side effects, hyperlipidemia and leukothrombocytopenia, are usually easily manageable. Sirolimus presents an alternative to prophylactic immunosuppression with calcineurin inhibitors and, in the field of transplantation, it represents a welcome addition to the immunosuppressive armamentarium.
PubMed ID
12742473 View in PubMed
Less detail