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Assessment of the potential allergenicity of ice structuring protein type III HPLC 12 using the FAO/WHO 2001 decision tree for novel foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5506
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2003 Jan;41(1):81-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
C. Bindslev-Jensen
E. Sten
L K Earl
R W R Crevel
U. Bindslev-Jensen
T K Hansen
P. Stahl Skov
L K Poulsen
Author Affiliation
Allergy Center, Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital, Sdr Boulevard 29, Denmark. carsten.bindslev-jensen@allergi.sdu.dk
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2003 Jan;41(1):81-7
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens - adverse effects - chemistry
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Antifreeze Proteins, Type III - adverse effects - chemistry
Child
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Decision Trees
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Food Hypersensitivity - prevention & control
Histamine - metabolism
Humans
Hydrolysis
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Pepsin A - metabolism
Perciformes
Radioallergosorbent Test
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Safety
Sequence Homology
Skin Tests
United Nations
World Health Organization
Abstract
The introduction of novel proteins into foods carries a risk of eliciting allergic reactions in individuals sensitive to the introduced protein. Therefore, decision trees for evaluation of the risk have been developed, the latest being proposed by WHO/FAO early in 2001. Proteins developed using modern biotechnology and derived from fish are being considered for use in food and other applications, and since allergy to fish is well established, a potential risk from such proteins to susceptible human beings exists. The overall aim of the study was to investigate the potential allergenicity of an Ice Structuring Protein (ISP) originating from an arctic fish (the ocean pout, Macrozoarces americanus) using the newly developed decision tree proposed by FAO/WHO. The methods used were those proposed by FAO/WHO including amino acid sequence analysis for sequence similarity to known allergens, methods for assessing degradability under standardised conditions, assays for detection of specific IgE against the protein (Maxisorb RAST) and histamine release from human basophils. In the present paper we describe the serum screening phase of the study and discuss the overall application of the decision tree to the assessment of the potential allergenicity of ISP Type III. In an accompanying paper [Food Chem. Toxicol. 40 (2002) 965], we detail the specific methodology used for the sequence analysis and assessment of resistance to pepsin-catalysed proteolysis of this protein. The ISP showed no sequence similarity to known allergens nor was it stable to proteolytic degradation using standardised methods. Using sera from 20 patients with a well-documented clinical history of fish allergy, positive in skin prick tests to ocean pout, eel pout and eel were used, positive IgE-binding in vitro to extracts of the same fish was confirmed. The sera also elicited histamine release in vitro in the presence of the same extracts. The ISP was negative in all cases in the same experiments. Using the proposed decision tree, we demonstrated the safety of the ISP to patients already sensitised to fish, as well as to individuals potentially susceptible to producing IgE responses to proteins. Furthermore, the practicability of the new decision tree was confirmed.
PubMed ID
12453731 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Oct 13;159(42):6199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-13-1997
Author
C. Bindslev-Jensen
F. Brandrup
Author Affiliation
Dermato-venerologisk afdeling I, Odense Universitetshospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Oct 13;159(42):6199-204
Date
Oct-13-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - genetics - immunology - microbiology
English Abstract
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Abstract
Nowadays about 15% of a birth cohort develops atopic dermatitis of varying severity, while only about 3% were affected in the sixties. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, based on genetic (polygenic inheritance) and environmental factors, the latter presumably accounting for the rising incidence. Several genes of importance for the immune pathogenesis of atopic diseases, including atopic dermatitis, have been identified. Exogenous factors, for instance air humidity and colonization of the skin with Staphylococcus aureus and Pityrosporum ovale are also important in the pathogenesis. Specific allergies, for instance dust mite allergy and food allergy, may be contributory causes. Treatment is directed against the dry skin, the eczematous reaction, skin infections and potential, specific allergies. Information given to patients and parents through "eczema schools" might be an important part of therapy with focus on atopic diseases, treatment strategy and prevention.
PubMed ID
9381589 View in PubMed
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A comparison between criteria for diagnosing atopic eczema in infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29555
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2005 Aug;153(2):352-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
H. Jøhnke
W. Vach
L A Norberg
C. Bindslev-Jensen
A. Høst
K E Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermato-venereology, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark. hj@dadlnet.dk
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2005 Aug;153(2):352-8
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology
Epidemiologic Methods
Family Health
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Infant
Male
Parents
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have shown different estimates of the frequency of atopic eczema (AE) in children. This may be explained by several factors including variations in the definition of AE, study design, age of study group, and the possibility of a changed perception of atopic diseases. The role of IgE sensitization in AE is a matter of debate. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and cumulative incidence of AE in a group of unselected infants followed prospectively from birth to 18 months of age using different diagnostic criteria; to evaluate the agreement between criteria; and to describe the association between atopic heredity and postnatal sensitization, respectively, and the development of AE according to the different diagnostic criteria. METHODS: During a 1-year period a consecutive series of 1095 newborns and their parents were approached at the maternity ward at the Odense University Hospital, Denmark and a cohort of 562 newborns was established. Infants were examined and followed prospectively from birth and at 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18 months of age. AE was diagnosed using four different criteria, the Hanifin and Rajka criteria, the Schultz-Larsen criteria, the Danish Allergy Research Centre (DARC) criteria developed for this study and doctor-diagnosed visible eczema with typical morphology and atopic distribution. Additionally, the U.K. diagnostic criteria based on a questionnaire were used at 1 year of age. Agreement between the four criteria was analysed at each time point and over time, and agreement between the four criteria and the U.K. questionnaire criteria was analysed. RESULTS: The cumulative 1-year prevalence of AE using the Hanifin and Rajka criteria was 9.8% (95% confidence interval, CI 7-13%), for the Schultz-Larsen criteria it was 7.5% (95% CI 5-10%), for the DARC criteria 8.2% (95% CI 6-11%), for visible eczema 12.2% (95% CI 9-16%) and for the U.K. criteria 7.5% (95% CI 5-10%). The pairwise agreement between criteria showed good agreement, with rates varying between 93% and 97% and kappa scores between 0.6 and 0.8. Agreement analysis of diagnoses between the four criteria demonstrated that cumulative incidences showed better agreement than point prevalence values. CONCLUSIONS: Agreement between different criteria for diagnosing AE was acceptable, but the mild cases constituted a diagnostic problem, although they were in the minority. Repeated examinations gave better agreement between diagnostic criteria than just one examination. Atopic heredity was less predictive for AE than sensitization to common food and inhalant allergens in early childhood.
PubMed ID
16086748 View in PubMed
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Food allergy and food sensitization in early childhood: results from the DARC cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152621
Source
Allergy. 2009 Jul;64(7):1023-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
E. Eller
H F Kjaer
A. Høst
K E Andersen
C. Bindslev-Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 2009 Jul;64(7):1023-9
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prospective Studies
Skin Tests
Abstract
The prevalence of food hypersensitivity (FHS) and the relationship with atopic dermatitis (AD) is controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the development of FHS and to correlate this with AD in relation to sensitization and symptoms.
This study combines new data from birth to 18 months of age with previous published results from 3 and 6 years. The Danish Allergy Research Centre cohort, including 562 children, is a unique, population-based, prospective birth cohort, with clinical examinations at all follow-ups. All children were examined for the development of AD using Hanifin-Rajka criteria and for FHS using interviews, skin prick test (SPT), specific immunoglobulin E (IgE), and food challenge according to EAACI guidelines.
Twenty children were confirmed with FHS to milk, egg, and peanut. FHS peaked at 18 months (3.6%) and then decreased to 1.2% at 72 months of age. No new cases were found after 3 years. Self-reporting could only be confirmed in 31% of cases. Among the 122 children with AD, 18 had FHS (14.8%). FHS was IgE-mediated in 95% of the cases but 16 of 20 children were additionally sensitized to other foods which they tolerated. Children with AD were neither more IgE-sensitized nor had higher levels of IgE when compared with healthy children but they were more persistently sensitized.
Sensitization to foods in young children without food allergy seems to be a normal phenomenon. The discrepancy between sensitization, self-reported food-related symptoms and confirmed FHS illustrates the need to perform standardized oral challenges in order to confirm the diagnosis of FHS.
PubMed ID
19220211 View in PubMed
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Hand eczema in The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis (TOACS): prevalence, incidence and risk factors from adolescence to adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262832
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):313-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
C G Mortz
C. Bindslev-Jensen
K E Andersen
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):313-23
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Gloves, Protective - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Several studies have evaluated the incidence and prevalence of hand eczema in unselected adults. However, no studies have followed unselected adolescents from primary school into adult life to evaluate the course and risk factors for hand eczema.
To estimate the incidence of hand eczema from adolescence to adulthood and the prevalence of hand eczema in young adults, together with risk factors for hand eczema.
A cohort of 1501 unselected eighth-grade schoolchildren (mean age 14 years) was established in 1995. In 2010, 1206 young adults from the cohort were asked to complete a questionnaire and participate in a clinical examination, including patch testing.
The incidence of hand eczema was 8·8 per 1000 person-years. The 1-year-period prevalence of hand eczema in the young adults was 14·3% (127 of 891) and the point prevalence 7·1% (63 of 891), with significantly higher prevalence in females. At the clinical examination 6·4% (30 of 469) had hand eczema. Factors in childhood of importance for adult hand eczema were atopic dermatitis and hand eczema. Wet work in adulthood was a risk factor, as was taking care of small children at home. Interestingly, hand eczema among unselected young adults was associated with sick leave/pension/rehabilitation, indicating possible severe social consequences. Only 39·0% of patients participated in the clinical examination, while 75·0% answered the questionnaire.
A high incidence and prevalence of hand eczema were found in 28-30-year-old adults, and were highly associated with childhood hand eczema and atopic dermatitis, along with wet work and taking care of small children in adulthood. There was no association with smoking, education level or nickel allergy in childhood.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Dermatol. 2014 Aug;171(2):210-125135049
PubMed ID
24628258 View in PubMed
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Prevalence, incidence rates and persistence of contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis in The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study: a 15-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120347
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2013 Feb;168(2):318-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
C G Mortz
C. Bindslev-Jensen
K E Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark. charlotte.moertz@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2013 Feb;168(2):318-25
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens - diagnostic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Contact - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prevalence
Young Adult
Abstract
A cohort of 1501 unselected 8th grade schoolchildren was established 15 years ago with the aim to follow the course of contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) from school age into adult life. To date no studies have evaluated incidence rates and persistence of contact allergy and ACD in an unselected population from adolescence to adulthood.
To estimate the incidence rates and persistence of contact allergy and ACD from adolescence to adulthood, and the point prevalence in adulthood.
In total, 1206 young adults from the cohort were contacted and asked to complete a questionnaire and participate in a clinical examination including patch testing with TRUE Test(®) . The questionnaire was answered by 899 (74.6%), however, only 442 (36·7%) of those invited participated in patch testing.
Over the 15-year period the incidence rates of contact allergy and ACD were 13·4% and 7·8%, respectively. The point prevalence of contact allergy was 20·1%, and present or past ACD was found in 12·9% of those followed. Nickel was the most common contact allergen (11·8%), followed by cobalt (2·3%), colophony (2·0%), thiomersal (1·4%) and p-phenylenediamine (1·1%). Most nickel reactions were persistent, and a significant number of new nickel sensitizations were found. Fragrance mix I reactions from adolescence could not be reproduced.
From adolescence to adulthood the incidence rates of contact allergy and ACD were high. Nickel was still the most common contact allergen, and new sensitizations occurred despite the European Union nickel regulation. Fragrance mix I was a poor marker for history of eczematous skin reaction to perfumed products.
PubMed ID
23013370 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of atopic dermatitis, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents. The Odense Adolescence Cohort Study on Atopic Diseases and Dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15506
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2001 Mar;144(3):523-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
C G Mortz
J M Lauritsen
C. Bindslev-Jensen
K E Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Odense University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2001 Mar;144(3):523-32
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology
Patch Tests
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Atopic diseases are common in children and adolescents. However, epidemiological knowledge is sparse for hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis in this age group. Furthermore, no population-based studies have evaluated the prevalence of atopic diseases and hand and contact dermatitis in the same group of adolescents. OBJECTIVES: To assess prevalence measures of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, allergic rhinitis and hand and contact dermatitis in adolescents in Odense municipality, Denmark. METHODS: The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study among 1501 eighth grade school children (age 12-16 years) and included questionnaire, interview, clinical examination and patch testing. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalence of AD was 21.3% (girls 25.7% vs. boys 17.0%, P
PubMed ID
11260009 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of food hypersensitivity in young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149717
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2009 Nov;20(7):686-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
M. Osterballe
C G Mortz
T K Hansen
K E Andersen
C. Bindslev-Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Allergy Center, Odense university Hospital, Odense, DK 5000, Denmark. morten.oesterballe@allergi.sdu.dk
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2009 Nov;20(7):686-92
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Fruit - immunology
Histamine Release
Humans
Milk Hypersensitivity
Octopodiformes - immunology
Peanut Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Penaeidae - immunology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Skin Tests
Vegetables - immunology
Young Adult
Abstract
rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity (FHS) and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported in the last decade. However, little is known on the prevalence in young adults. This study estimated the prevalence of FHS to the most common allergenic foods in an unselected population of young adults. We investigated a cohort of 1272 young adults 22 years of age by questionnaire, skin prick test (SPT) and histamin release (HR) followed by oral challenge to the most common allergenic foods. FHS was divided into primary and secondary FHS. Primary FHS was defined as being independent of pollen sensitization, whereas secondary FHS was defined as reactions to pollen related fruits and vegetables in pollen allergic patients. The questionnaire was returned by 77.1%. Primary FHS was reported by 19.6% and secondary FHS by 16.7% of the participants. Confirmed primary FHS by oral challenge was 1.7% [1.1% - 2.95%]. In primary FHS, the most common allergenic food was peanut (0.6%) followed by additives (0.5%), shrimp (0.2%), codfish (0.1%), cow's milk (0.1%), octopus (0.1%) and soy (0.1%). In secondary FHS, kiwi allergy was reported by 7.8% of the participants followed by hazelnut (6.6%), pineapple (4.4%), apple (4.3%), orange (4.2%), tomato (3.8%), peach (3.0%) and brazil nut (2.7%). This study found a 1.7% [1.1% - 2.95%] prevalence of primary FHS confirmed by oral challenge to the most common allergenic foods in an unselected population of young adults.
PubMed ID
19594854 View in PubMed
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Reactivity to patch tests with nickel sulfate and fragrance mix in infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30090
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2004 Sep;51(3):141-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
H. Jøhnke
L A Norberg
W. Vach
C. Bindslev-Jensen
A. Høst
K E Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermato-venereology, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2004 Sep;51(3):141-7
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - administration & dosage - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - etiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Irritants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Male
Nickel - administration & dosage - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Patch Tests - methods
Perfume - administration & dosage - adverse effects - diagnostic use
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The pattern of patch test reactivity to nickel sulfate and fragrance mix was studied with respect to patch test performance, reproducibility and clinical relevance in a population of unselected infants followed prospectively from birth to 18 months of age. TRUE Testtrade mark patches with nickel sulfate in 3 concentrations, 200, 66 and 22 microg/cm(2), and fragrance mix 430 microg/cm(2) were used. A likely case of nickel sensitivity was defined as a reproducible positive reaction with at least homogeneous erythema and palpable infiltration occurring at least 2x and present at both the 12 and 18 months follow-up. 543 infants (268 girls and 275 boys) were tested at least 1x, 304 were tested at both 12 and 18 months. The prevalence of a reproducible positive reaction to nickel was 8.6% (20 girls and 6 boys). A transient positive reaction was observed in 111 children. Clinical relevance of nickel sensitivity was found in only 1 child. No reproducible positive reaction to fragrance mix was found. The high proportion of transient patch test reactivity to nickel sulfate 200 microg/cm(2) indicates that this standard concentration used for adults cannot be applied to infants. The interpretation of a single positive nickel patch test in infants must be assessed with caution and it is probably of non-specific or irritant nature.
PubMed ID
15479203 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.