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Associations between Proportion of Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids, Depressive Symptoms and Major Depressive Disorder. Cross-Sectional Analyses from the AGES Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290027
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2018; 22(3):354-360
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
C M Imai
T I Halldorsson
T Aspelund
G Eiriksdottir
L J Launer
I Thorsdottir
T B Harris
V Gudnason
I A Brouwer
I Gunnarsdottir
Author Affiliation
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir, Unit for Nutrition Research, Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland and Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Eiriksgata 29, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland, ingigun@hi.is.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2018; 22(3):354-360
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Deficits in n-3 fatty acids may be associated with depression. However, data are scarce from older adults who are at greater risk of poor dietary intake and of developing depression.
To investigate proportion of plasma phospholipid fatty acids with respect to depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in community dwelling older adults.
Cross-sectional analyses of 1571 participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study aged 67-93 years. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). Major depressive disorder was assessed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI).
Depressive symptoms were observed in 195 (12.4%) subjects and there were 27 (1.7%) cases of major depressive disorder. Participants with depressive symptoms were less educated, more likely to be smokers, less physically active and consumed cod liver oil less frequently. Difference in GDS-15 scores by tertiles of n-3 fatty acid proportion was not significant. Proportion of long chain n-3 fatty acids (Eicosapentaenoic- + Docosahexaenoic acid) were inversely related to major depressive disorder, (tertile 2 vs. tertile 1) OR: 0.31 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.86); tertile 3 vs. tertile 1, OR: 0.45 (95% CI: 0.17, 1.21).
In our cross sectional analyses low proportions of long chain n-3 fatty acids in plasma phospholipids appear to be associated with increased risk of major depressive disorder. However, the results from this study warrant further investigation in prospective setting with sufficiently long follow-up.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29484348 View in PubMed
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Faster increase in body mass index between ages 8 and 13 is associated with risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260276
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2014 Jul;24(7):730-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
C M Imai
I. Gunnarsdottir
V. Gudnason
T. Aspelund
B E Birgisdottir
I. Thorsdottir
T I Halldorsson
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2014 Jul;24(7):730-6
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Child
Child Development
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Morbidity
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
Excess childhood weight is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. Whether this is mediated through adult body mass index (BMI) and associated risk factors such as metabolic derangements remains unclear. The aim was to examine whether childhood BMI velocity (?kg m(-2) per year) was associated with adult CVD mortality and to examine how adult BMI and cardiometabolic risk factors contribute to the association.
Subjects were 1924 Icelanders born between 1921 and 1935 and living in Reykjavik when recruited into a longitudinal study from 1967 to 1991. From ages 8-13 years, BMI velocity was calculated to quantify the association between childhood growth and adult CVD mortality. Deaths from recruitment to 31 December 2009 were extracted from the national register. There were 202 CVD deaths among men and 90 CVD deaths among women (mean follow-up: 25.9 years). Faster BMI velocity from ages 8-13 years was associated with CVD mortality when comparing those in the highest versus lowest tertile with corresponding hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval (CI)): 1.49 (1.03, 2.15) among men and 2.32 (1.32, 4.08) among women after adjustment for mid-life BMI and CVD risk factors. Faster childhood BMI velocity was associated with elevated CVD risk factors among men at mid-life but these associations were less pronounced among women.
Faster increase in BMI from ages 8-13 years was associated with an increased CVD mortality risk. Children with early growth spurts coupled with excess weight gain during this transition period from childhood into adolescence should be closely monitored to ensure better health in adulthood.
PubMed ID
24560474 View in PubMed
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