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Analysis of hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds in whole blood from Canadian inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6761
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
C D Sandau
P. Ayotte
E. Dewailly
J. Duffe
R J Norstrom
Author Affiliation
Centre for Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2000 Jul;108(7):611-6
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Humans
Hydroxylation
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In this study, we identified the main hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) and other chlorinated phenolic compounds and we determined their relative concentrations in whole blood from 13 male and 17 female Inuit from northern Quebec, Canada, and from a pooled whole blood sample from southern Quebec. We also determined concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Total OH-PCB concentrations were variable among the Inuit samples, ranging over 2 orders of magnitude (0.117-11.6 ng/g whole blood wet weight). These concentrations were equal to and up to 70 times those found for the southern Quebec pooled whole blood sample. Geometric mean concentrations of total OH-PCBs were 1.73 and 1.01 ng/g whole blood for Inuit men and women, respectively, and 0.161 ng/g whole blood for the southern population pool. There are limited data available for comparison, but the levels of OH-PCBs in Inuit are higher than those previously reported in the literature for other populations. There was a significant correlation (p
PubMed ID
10903613 View in PubMed
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Levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in a coastal northern Norwegian population with high fish-liver intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76215
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 May;8(5):552-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
T M Sandanger
M. Brustad
C D Sandau
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Polar Environmental Centre, Tromsø, Norway. torkjel.sandanger@nilu.no.
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 May;8(5):552-7
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Recent research has again raised the issue regarding the potential health effects of long term exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the context of a risk-benefit analysis. There remains clear evidence of the beneficial effects of fish consumption on public health and in particular fatty fish with its essential fatty acids. In addition to providing fatty acids, fish fat constitutes an essential source to vitamin D for the northern Norwegian population. Norwegian Food Control Authorities have recommended that children and women of childbearing age should not consume fish liver due to the risk associated with high intake of POPs. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of fish liver intake on the levels of PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in a rural coastal community (n = 31) in northern Norway, applying a cross-sectional design. The geometric mean plasma levels of sum of PCBs (14 congeners) and p,p'-DDE was found to be 558 microg kg(-1) lipids and 179 microg kg(-1) lipids, respectively. These levels were not significantly affected by the reported intake of fish liver, when age and gender were considered. Age in particular, but also gender were significant predictors for most compounds. When merging the dataset with an urban population with considerable lower intake of fish liver, the intake of cod liver still did not significantly affect the levels of PCBs and p,p'-DDE when adjusted for age and gender. Age and gender remain the strongest predictors of plasma levels of POPs in this study whereas fish liver intake was not significantly associated with the POPs.
PubMed ID
16688357 View in PubMed
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