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American Academy of Pediatrics. Preventive health care for young children: Findings from a 10-country study and directions for United States policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36720
Source
Pediatrics. 1992 May;89(5 Pt 2):981-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
B C Williams
C A Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7400.
Source
Pediatrics. 1992 May;89(5 Pt 2):981-98
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Advocacy
Child Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Immunization - standards
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Population Surveillance
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Social Support
Social Welfare
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Infant health and survival in the US compare unfavorably with other Western industrial democracies. Circumstances that contribute to favorable pregnancy outcomes in other countries include nearly complete participation of pregnant women in early prenatal care and linkage of care to extensive support benefits. The study reported here extends these earlier observations to preventive health services for children from infancy through adolescence and to the social benefit programs that support their families. This report looks at the condition of children in 10 European countries: Belgium, Denmark, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All of these countries have better infant survival rates than the US, and they all share elements of pluralism in their systems of health care.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatrics. 1992 Dec;90(6):1005-61437418
PubMed ID
1574377 View in PubMed
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Continuity of care for short-stay neurosurgery patients: a quality improvement initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182800
Source
Axone. 2001 Dec;23(2):14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
P. Lam
C L White
S. Runions
C A Miller
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Axone. 2001 Dec;23(2):14-21
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Diskectomy - nursing - psychology - standards
Female
Humans
Intervertebral Disc Displacement - surgery
Laminectomy - nursing - psychology - standards
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Education as Topic - standards
Quebec
Questionnaires
Spinal Stenosis - surgery
Surgical Procedures, Elective - psychology - standards
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Decreases in the length of hospital stay for patients undergoing spinal surgery prompted this evaluation of the post-discharge needs of patients and the strategies that patients and their families employ to meet these needs. The nature and extent of post-discharge problems experienced by newly discharged patients was required as a baseline for the evaluation and improvement of discharge planning. Forty patients were interviewed following discharge, 20 patients within the first week of discharge, and 20 different patients between three and four weeks after discharge. Most patients reported that they had been well-informed about pain management and the majority of patients reported that pain was well-controlled. There was a subset of patients, however, who continued to report high levels of pain, even at one month after discharge. Less than one in three patients stated that they had received information about wound care and the information received was not consistent among health professionals. Given the limited time to prepare patients for discharge, this project highlights the need for written materials and for systematic follow-up after discharge.
PubMed ID
14621497 View in PubMed
Less detail