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Arctic air pollution and human health: What effects should be expected?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49284
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jan 15;160-161:529-537
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1995
Author
Ayotte, P
Dewailly, E
Bruneau, S
Careau, H
Vézina, A
Author Affiliation
Public Health Center (Québec Region), Environmental Health Service, Ste-Foy, Canada.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jan 15;160-161:529-537
Date
Jan-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Arctic Regions
Body Burden
Food Contamination
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - adverse effects - analysis
Metals - adverse effects - analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Seafood
Abstract
Persistent contaminants such as heavy metals and organochlorine compounds are transported from distant sources to the Arctic by oceanic and atmospheric currents. Natives inhabiting the Arctic can be exposed, because they exist at the highest trophic level of the arctic aquatic food chain, along which biomagnification of contaminants occurs. We reviewed the data available on heavy metal and organochlorine body burden in natives from different regions of Nunavik (northern Québec) and assessed the potential risk of health effects. In addition, we investigated the relationship between each contaminant plasma level and omega-3 fatty acid content of plasma phospholipid, a surrogate measure for aquatic food consumption. Cadmium exposure appears to be unrelated to the consumption of species from the aquatic food chain (r = 0.0004; P = 0.99), whereas PCBs and mercury were (r = 0.49 and 0.52, respectively; P
PubMed ID
7892583 View in PubMed
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Development of risk communication activities and research in Nunavik

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102187
Source
Pages 356-358 in Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavik, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
  1 document  
Author
Bruneau, S
Grondin, J
Author Affiliation
Quebec Centre for Public Health, Quebec, Canada
Source
Pages 356-358 in Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavik, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Arctic
Contaminants
Environmental health
Food chain
Health hazards
Health Research
Inuit
Nunavik
Risk communication
Abstract
During the last decades, environmental studies have found concerning quantities of contaminants in the Arctic food chain. Increasingly, the Inuit have to deal with the fact that the information available (biological, physical, chemical) is quite difficult to comprehend and often misconstrued through media distortion. In Nunavik, a first step toward community-based environmental risk communications was undertaken. After a preliminary survey found concerning levels of contaminants in breast milk, a detailed research program was initiated and a resource committee was set up to disseminate information on the ongoing research activities and also on the issue of the contamination of the food chain by organochlorines. This communication will present a summary of events linked with the committee's activities and a discussion on the uneasy task of communicating risks.
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Gestational age and birth weight in relation to n-3 fatty acids among Inuit (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4451
Source
Lipids. 2004 Jul;39(7):617-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Lucas M
Dewailly E
Muckle G
Ayotte P
Bruneau S
Gingras S
Rhainds M
Holub BJ
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research Unit, Laval University Medical Research Centre, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Lipids. 2004 Jul;39(7):617-26
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Birth weight
Diet
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - chemistry - metabolism
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seafood
Statistics
Abstract
Seafood consumption during pregnancy carries both benefits (high n-3 FA intake) and risks (exposure to environmental contaminants) for the developing fetus. We determined the impacts of marine n-3 FA and environmental contaminants on gestational age (GA) of Nunavik women and the anthropometric characteristics of their newborns. FA and contaminant (polychlorinated biphenyls and mercury) concentrations were measured in cord plasma of Nunavik newborns (n = 454) and compared with those of a group of newborns (n = 29) from southern Québec. Data were collected from hospital records and birth certificates. In Nunavik newborns, arachidonic acid (AA) was two times lower (P
PubMed ID
15588018 View in PubMed
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Iron-deficiency anemia in Nunavik: pregnancy and infancy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2857
Source
Pages 135-140 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
/nuulitsivik Materinity. Masters thesis. McGill University, Department of Epidemiology, 1996. 6. Dewailly E, Laliberte C, Gingras S, Bruneau S. The contamination of breast milk in Nunavik: evaluation of infant health risks. Environmen- tal Health Service, Quebec Public Health Cen- ter, 1993. 7
  1 document  
Author
Hodgins, S.
Dewailly, E.
Chatwood, S.
Bruneau, S.
Bernier, F.
Author Affiliation
Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services, Kuujjuaq, PQ, Canada
Source
Pages 135-140 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Helicobacter pylori
Inuit
Iron-deficiency anemia
Nunavik
Pregnancy
Abstract
PURPOSE: This paper documents the problem of iron-deficiency anemia in the Inuit region of Nunavik, in Northern Quebec, particularly among pregnant women and infants. It also addresses the issue of Helicobacter pylori gastritis as a possible cause of anemia in this population. METHOD: Data on anemia in pregnancy are from routinely collected prenatal records. Data on anemia in infants are drawn from blood samples collected for a study on the impact of environmental contaminants. Helicobacter serologies were done on cord-blood specimens from 100 consecutive births screened for contaminant exposure. For comparison, serologies were done on a series of cord-blood specimens from 99 births in Southern Quebec. RESULTS: By term, 40% of pregnant women in Nunavik are anemic (Hgb
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Longitudinal observations (1987-1997) on the prevalence of middle ear disease and associated risk factors among Inuit children of Inukjuak, Nunavik, Quebec, Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6330
Source
Pages 632-639 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Hospital Centre,Tulattavik and lnuufitsi- Ayotte P, Dewailly E, Ryan JJ, Bruneau S, Lebel, G. PCBs and dioxin-like compounds in plasma of adult Inuit Ii Ying in N unavik (Arctic Quebec). Chemospherc 1997; 31 :1459-68. vik Health Centres. Hannah Ayukawa Audiology Deportment. Montreal Children's
  1 document  
Author
Bruneau, S
Ayukawa, H
Proulx, J.F
Baxter, J.D
Kost, K
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research Unit, Laval University Hospital Centre, Beauport, Quebec, Canada
Source
Pages 632-639 in P. Bjerregaard et al., eds. Part II, Proceedings of the 11th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Harstad, Norway, June 5-9, 2000. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2001;60(4)
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antibacterial agents - therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Otitis media - drug therapy - ethnology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The prevalence of middle ear disease in 2-6 year old children in 1997 was compared with that observed in 1987 in the same Inuit community in northern Quebec. Risk and protective factors associated with middle ear disease were also assessed. A total of 122 children participated. The assessments included: otological examination, cerumen sampling for analysis of organochlorine compounds, medical file review, and parent questionnaire regarding environmental and lifestyle factors. Comparison of ear examination results in 1997 and 1987 showed that there had been no change in the prevalence of chronic otitis media [9.4% to 10.8%] and proportion of ear drums with minimal scarring [45.6% to 45.4%], an increase in the proportion of normal ear drums [23.9% to 39.0%], a decrease the proportion with maximal scarring [17.8% to 2.0%] and little difference in the rate of serous otitis media [3.3% to 2.8%]. Factors found to be significantly associated with middle ear disease included: number of persons/bedroom, number of siblings with a history of ear disease, age at first, second and third visit to the nursing station for ear problems, and type of milk (formula vs. non-formula) in bottle fed children.
PubMed ID
11768445 View in PubMed
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Source
Pages 364-366 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
  1 document  
Author
Grondin, J
Bruneau, S
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Service, Centre for Public Health, Québec, Canada
Source
Pages 364-366 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Arctic
Contaminants
Environmental health
Food chain
Health effects
Human
Impacts
Inuit
Mineral resource development
Mining
Risk
Abstract
The presentation focuses on the repercussions of mining on the relations between the physical and human environments in the Arctic. Direct and indirect effects of mining on Inuit health are discussed from the general perspective of environmental health. First, potential direct effects on the human environment are described from the viewpoint of occupational health (traumatic, physical, chemical, biological risks) and the population's risks in regard to marine and land transportation. Then, indirect toxicological risks (mainly through the contamination of the food chain) as well as social and cultural impacts on human health are discussed (e.g., through relational stress, consumption pattern changes, pressure on resource management and land use, etc.). Finally, induced impacts of direct and indirect health effects are illustrated by case study examples of mineral resource development projects. Cumulative impacts of mining are highlighted in view of the need to evaluate and monitor long-term as well as short-term health effects through the integration of multidisciplinary evaluations and local knowledge, expectancies, and issues.
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Multidisciplinary health research on contaminants in the Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102190
Source
Pages 367-371 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
  1 document  
Author
Grondin, J
Dewailly, Ã?
Dewailly, E
Bruneau, S
Ayotte, P
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Service, Québec Centre for Public Health, Québec, Canada
Source
Pages 367-371 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Arctic
Contaminants
Contamination
Ecosystems
Food chain
Global health
Health Research
Human
Impacts
Inuit
Abstract
This communication describes work done to date by the Environmental Health Service on the development of multidisciplinary research regarding the health status and problems of the Inuit in relation to the contamination of the Eastern Canadian Arctic food chain. The concepts of total environmental and global health are outlined in order to introduce a discussion on the social impacts of contaminants. This input is presented as the basis of the development of an ecosystems health perspective on contaminants research which emphasizes the integration of the medical, social, economic, and political dimensions of the contamination of the Eastern Canadian Arctic.
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Otitis media and hearing loss among 12-16-year-old Inuit of Inukjuak, Quebec, Canada

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6328
Source
Pages 312-314 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Clin North Am 1999; 46: 143-152. 5. Bruneau S, Meyer F, Julien G, Baxter J, Gingras S. Environmental and Lifestyle Factors Associated with Ear Drum Scarring among Inuit and Cree Children. (unpublished, internal report). Hannah Ayukawa Hearing and Otitis Progran1 Montreal Children's Hospital
  1 document  
Author
Ayukawa, H
Bruneau, S
Proulx, JF
Macarthur, J
Baxter, J
Author Affiliation
Hearing and Otitis Program, Tulattavik Health Centre, Kuujjuaq, Quebec
Source
Pages 312-314 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Chronic Disease
Hearing loss - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Hearing Tests
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Otitis media - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Chronic otitis media (COM) and associated hearing loss is a frequent problem for many Inuit children in Canada. In this study, we evaluated individuals aged 12-16 years living in Inukjuak, to determine the prevalence of middle ear disease and hearing loss, and the effect of hearing loss on academic performance. METHODS: Otological examination, hearing test, medical and school file review were performed in November 1997. 88 individuals were seen. RESULTS: Otological examination revealed maximal scarring in 1.8%, minimal scarring in 34.9%, normal eardrums in 49.1% and chronic otitis media in 16.9%. There were 62 individuals whose ear exams could be directly compared with a previous exam done in 1987. Of those, there were three ears that had developed COM and 4/13 ears with COM in 1987 that had healed. Hearing tests found bilateral normal hearing in 80% (PTA
PubMed ID
15736675 View in PubMed
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Temporal and spatial trends of human exposure from food chain contaminants in the Canadian Arctic

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102188
Source
Pages 359-363 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
. Bayreuth, Germany: Ecoinforma Press: 361-8, 1990. 12. Dewai!ly E, Nantel A, Weber JP and Meyer F. High levels of PCBs in breast milk of Inuit women from Arctic Quebec. Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 1989; 43:641-646. 13. Dewailly E, Nantel A, Bruneau S, Laliberte C, Ferron L and Gingras S. Breast
  1 document  
Author
Dewailly, Ã?
Dewailly, E
Ayotte, P
Careau, H
Bruneau, S
Grondin, J
Author Affiliation
Québec Public Health Center, Canada
Source
Pages 359-363 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aquatic food chain
Arctic
Biomagnification
Body burdens
Canada
Contaminants
Contamination
Country foods
Diet
Environment
Exposure
Food chain
Health
Heavy metals
Human
Mercury
Organochlorines
Sea mammals
Spatial trends
Temporal trends
Abstract
For cultural and economic reasons, Inuit people rely heavily on country foods for their subsistence. Knowing the contamination levels for organochlorines and heavy metals reported in the edible tissues of sea mammals and their estimated daily intake, relatively high body burdens are predicted. In Arctic Canada, human concentrations have been reported for heavy metals (lead, cadmium and mercury) and organochlorines (PCBs, dioxins, chlorinated pesticides, etc.). A decrease in mercury exposure over the last decade is observed, although no temporal trend could be observed for organochlorines, because results on the latter are only available since 1985-1986.
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