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[< Early stimulation > programs evaluation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84048
Source
Arch Pediatr. 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 1:S58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Bonnier C.
Author Affiliation
Service de neurologie pédiatrique, Cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc, avenue Hippocrate, 10, 1200-Bruxelles, Belgique. bonnier@nepe.ucl.ac.be
Source
Arch Pediatr. 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 1:S58-64
Date
Sep-2007
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Early intervention include educational and neuroprotection strategies. Early educational strategies are based on the cerebral plasticity concept. Neuroprotection, initially reserved for molecules preventing cell death phenomena, can be extended now to all actions promoting harmonious development and preventing handicaps, and include organisational, therapeutic and environmental aspects. Early stimulation programs have been first devised in United States for vulnerable children who belong to an unfavorable socio-economic category ; positive effects were recorded in school failure rates and social problems ; programs have also been launched in several countries for premature infants and infants with a low birth weight, population exposed to a high risk of deficiencies. The programs are targetted either to the child, or to the parents, or combined to provide assistance for both the child and the parents. The programs given the best evaluation are NIDCAP Program in Sweden (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program), intended for babies
PubMed ID
17939961 View in PubMed
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