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Employer, insurance, and health system response to long-term sick leave in the public sector: policy implications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45702
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2005 Jun;15(2):167-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Bodil Heijbel
Malin Josephson
Irene Jensen
Eva Vingård
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Section for Personal Injury Prevention, Box 12718, SE-112 94 Stockholm, Sweden. bodil.heijbel@cns.ki.se
Source
J Occup Rehabil. 2005 Jun;15(2):167-76
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Female
Government Agencies
Health Benefit Plans, Employee
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Medicine
Occupational Therapy - utilization
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study has been conducted to describe the situation of long-term sick-listed persons employed in the public sector regarding the medical reasons of their sick leave, the duration of their problems, the duration of the actual sick leave, rehabilitation support, rehabilitation measures, and the persons expectations of the future. Response rate of a postal questionnaire, where 484 women and 51 men on long-term sick leave answered, was 69%. The study-group consisted of 90% women with a median age of 50 years. The most common reasons for sick listing were long-lasting musculoskeletal problems, especially neck/shoulder pain, low back pain and osteoarthritis or other joint problems and mental problems, especially depression and burn-out syndromes. Forty-seven procent of the men and 57% of the women had been on the sick list for more than a year. Only half of them had been subjected to the legally required rehabilitation investigation of the employer This half got access to rehabilitation programs and/or vocational rehabilitation to a greater extent than those who not had been subjected to rehabilitation investigation. Less than half had been in contact with the workplace-connected rehabilitation actors, the Occupational Health Service or the Trade Union. In spite of this the sick-listed persons had a positive view of their future return to work. For long-term sick-listed persons in the public sector, there is a great potential for improvements of the rehabilitation at the workplace arena, in the involvement and cooperation between the already existing rehabilitation actors, in order to promote return to work.
PubMed ID
15844674 View in PubMed
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Long-term sick-listing among women in the public sector and its associations with age, social situation, lifestyle, and work factors: a three-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61393
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(5):370-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Eva Vingård
Per Lindberg
Malin Josephson
Margaretha Voss
Bodil Heijbel
Lars Alfredsson
Stefan Stark
Ake Nygren
Author Affiliation
Section of Personal Injury Prevention, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.vingard@cns.ki.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2005;33(5):370-5
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workplace
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Since 1997 the number of long-term sick-listed people in Sweden has increased dramatically, especially among women employed in the public sector. AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate associations between age, social situation, lifestyle, work factors, and long-term sick-listing (> or =28 days), regardless of diagnosis, during a period of three years among women employed in the public sector. METHODS: Exposure information at baseline was recorded by a questionnaire. All new spells of sick listing (> or =28 days were consecutively reported from the employer for three years from baseline. In total 6,246 women from the public sector in Sweden answered the questionnaire (85% response rate); 5,224 were classified as having good or rather good health for working and were included. Of these, 918 persons had spells of sick-listing (> or =28 days during follow-up. RESULTS: Univariate and multivariate analyses for calculating relative risks (RR) were carried out. In the Cox regression model age (RR 1.4), strained financial situation (RR 1.3), obesity (RR 1.3), bullying (RR 1.5), physical demands at work higher than own capacity (RR 1.5), and mental demands at work higher than own capacity (1.2) remained risk indicators for long-term sick-listing. CONCLUSION: This study suggests prevention of some work and lifestyle factors as general measures to reduce long-term sick-listing among women in the public sector.
PubMed ID
16265806 View in PubMed
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Recovery, work-life balance and work experiences important to self-rated health: A questionnaire study on salutogenic work factors among Swedish primary health care employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295169
Source
Work. 2018; 59(1):155-163
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Lina Ejlertsson
Bodil Heijbel
Göran Ejlertsson
Ingemar Andersson
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Society, Kristianstad University, Kristianstad, Sweden.
Source
Work. 2018; 59(1):155-163
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health status
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - manpower
Self Report
Sense of Coherence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Work-Life Balance - methods
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
There is a lack of information on positive work factors among health care workers.
To explore salutogenic work-related factors among primary health care employees.
Questionnaire to all employees (n?=?599) from different professions in public and private primary health care centers in one health care district in Sweden. The questionnaire, which had a salutogenic perspective, included information on self-rated health from the previously validated SHIS (Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale), psychosocial work environment and experiences, recovery, leadership, social climate, reflection and work-life balance.
The response rate was 84%. A multivariable linear regression model, with SHIS as the dependent variable, showed three significant predictors. Recovery had the highest relationship to SHIS (ß=?0.34), followed by experience of work-life balance (ß=?0.25) and work experiences (ß=?0.20). Increased experience of recovery during working hours related to higher self-rated health independent of recovery outside work.
Individual experiences of work, work-life balance and, most importantly, recovery seem to be essential areas for health promotion. Recovery outside the workplace has been studied previously, but since recovery during work was shown to be of great importance in relation to higher self-rated health, more research is needed to explore different recovery strategies in the workplace.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29439377 View in PubMed
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