Skip header and navigation

6 records – page 1 of 1.

Adverse perinatal outcome and later kidney biopsy in the mother.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46939
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Mar;17(3):837-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Lorentz M Irgens
Leif Bostad
Bjarne M Iversen
Author Affiliation
Renal Research Group, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, and The Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway. bjorn.vikse@med.uib.no
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Mar;17(3):837-45
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Strong associations of adverse perinatal outcomes have been identified with later cardiovascular disease in the mother. Few studies have addressed associations with kidney disease. This study investigated whether perinatal outcomes are associated with later clinical kidney disease as diagnosed by kidney biopsy. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway contains data on all childbirths in Norway since 1967. The Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry contains data on all kidney biopsies in Norway since 1988. All women with a first singleton delivery from 1967 to 1998 were included. Pregnancy-related predictors of later kidney biopsy were analyzed by Cox regression analyses. A total of 756,420 women were included, and after a mean period of 15.9+/-9.4 yr, 588 had a kidney biopsy. Compared with women without preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of >or=2.5 kg, women with no preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of 1.5 to 2.5 kg had a relative risk (RR) for a later kidney biopsy of 1.7, women with no preeclampsia and with offspring with birth weight of or=2.5 kg had an RR of 2.5, women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of 1.5 to 2.5 kg had an RR of 4.5, and women with preeclampsia and with offspring with a birth weight of
PubMed ID
16421228 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are adverse pregnancy outcomes risk factors for development of end-stage renal disease in women with diabetes?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96871
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 May 20;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2010
Author
Miriam K Sandvik
Bjarne M Iversen
Lorentz M Irgens
Rolv Skjaerven
Torbjørn Leivestad
Eirik Søfteland
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Author Affiliation
1Renal Research Group, Institute of Medicine.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 May 20;
Date
May-20-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background. It is unknown whether adverse pregnancy-related outcomes in women with pregestational diabetes are associated with later development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or death. Methods. We linked data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway with data from the Norwegian Renal Registry and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Data from up to three pregnancies for women with a first singleton delivery from 1967 to 1994 were included and analysed in a cohort design using Cox regression. Results. Altogether, 639 018 women were included in the analyses, among whom 2204 women had diabetes mellitus before pregnancy. Their first pregnancy was complicated by pre-eclampsia in 13.2%, low birth weight offspring (
PubMed ID
20494895 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical outcome of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis treated with plasma exchange.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191737
Source
Blood Purif. 2002;20(2):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Knut Aasarød
Bjarne M Iversen
Jens Hammerstrøm
Leif Bostad
Størker Jørstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University Hospital of Trondheim; The Norwegian Kidney Register, Norway. knut.aasarod@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Blood Purif. 2002;20(2):167-73
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Creatine - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - administration & dosage
Kidney Failure, Chronic - etiology - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Plasma Exchange - mortality - standards
Renal Dialysis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Wegener Granulomatosis - complications - mortality - therapy
Abstract
We report the clinical course of 29 patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) treated with plasma exchange (PE) in Norway in the period from 1988 to 1999. Median follow-up was 41.5 months. The mean number of exchanges was 8.5 +/- 5.8 (range 2-32). Median serum creatinine concentration was 400 micromol/l (range 90-1,356) and 17 patients were dialysis dependent at presentation. Two- and five-year patient survival was 75 and 71%, respectively, and renal (ESRD-free) survival was 74 and 54%, respectively. Seven (50%) of the 14 patients alive in the dialysis group had discontinued dialysis within the first month, and 6 (50%) of 12 patients alive at follow-up had independent renal function. No patients, however, had normal serum creatinine concentration. Median time until development of ESRD for patients presenting with a need for dialysis was approximately 32 months. The development of ESRD in 79 patients treated with immunosuppression alone was significantly lower, but when adjusted for serum creatinine there was no difference between patients treated with or without PE. Although a considerable fraction of patients with WG and severe renal involvement regain independent renal function, few will have normal serum creatinine concentration at follow-up, despite the addition of PE as adjunctive therapy.
PubMed ID
11818680 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical prognostic factors in biopsy-proven benign nephrosclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186671
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2003 Mar;18(3):517-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Knut Aasarød
Leif Bostad
Bjarne M Iversen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Kidney Register, Institute of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. bjorn.vikse@med.uib.no
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2003 Mar;18(3):517-23
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrosclerosis - complications - epidemiology - pathology
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Hypertensive renal damage has become one of the most important causes of end-stage renal failure (ESRF) in Western countries. Affected patients rarely have a kidney biopsy and their diagnoses therefore remain uncertain. The objective of the present study was to examine patients suspected of renal glomerular disease, which at biopsy proved to have isolated benign nephrosclerosis. We wanted to study the effect of different clinical and laboratory variables at the time of biopsy on the short-term and long-term progression to ESRF and death.
We retrospectively examined 102 patients who were diagnosed by kidney biopsy in Norway between April 1988 and December 1990. All patients were followed by means of registries for approximately 13 years to describe renal and patient survival.
The age of the patients at the time of biopsy was 55+/-15 years (range 15-88 years). Three years after the time of biopsy, 18% had developed ESRF and 24% had died; the corresponding numbers 13 years after biopsy were 32% and 47%. By Kaplan-Meier analyses, the following variables indicated short-term progression to ESRF: serum creatinine > or = 200 micro mol/l, systolic blood pressure > or = 160 mmHg and proteinuria > or = 1 g/24 h. In addition, patients with increased diastolic blood pressure, increased age and decreased serum albumin tended to develop ESRF more often. Long-term predictors of ESRF in Kaplan-Meier analyses were increased serum creatinine and urinary protein. Independent risk factors for progression to ESRF were increased serum creatinine and increased urinary protein. Independent risk factors for death were increased age and increased serum creatinine.
Benign nephrosclerosis is a common condition that is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Short-term predictors of ESRF differ from long-term predictors and this may reflect a pathophysiologically meaningful difference.
PubMed ID
12584273 View in PubMed
Less detail

Previous preeclampsia and risk for progression of biopsy-verified kidney disease to end-stage renal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97546
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 Mar 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-26-2010
Author
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Stein Hallan
Leif Bostad
Torbjørn Leivestad
Bjarne M Iversen
Author Affiliation
1Renal Research Group, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2010 Mar 26;
Date
Mar-26-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A recent study has shown that preeclampsia is an important risk marker for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study investigated whether previous preeclampsia was associated with progression of established kidney disease. Material and methods. Data from the Norwegian Kidney Biopsy Registry and the Medical Birth Registry of Norway were linked. We included women who, after their last pregnancy, had had a representative kidney biopsy in 1988-2005. Women were followed up for the development of ESRD using data from the Norwegian Renal Registry. Baseline was set at the time of biopsy and Cox regression statistics were performed. RESULTS: Of the 582 included women, 76 developed ESRD 3.9 +/- 3.4 years (range, 0.08-16 years) after diagnosis. Mean age at first birth was 24.0 +/- 4.8 years and at the time of diagnosis 41.3 +/- 9.7 years. Women with clinically diagnosed preeclampsia in their first pregnancy had a relative risk of ESRD of 1.2 (95% CI, 0.63-2.4) and women with preterm birth had a relative risk of 2.1 (95% CI, 1.2-3.9). After extensive adjustments for clinical and histopathological variables at the time of diagnosis, the relative risks were 1.1 (95% CI, 0.50-2.6) and 2.4 (95% CI, 1.2-4.6), respectively. Compared to women with a first term birth without preeclampsia, women with term preeclampsia were diagnosed at a younger age (36 vs 42 years) and women with preterm birth without preeclampsia had a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at diagnosis (48 vs 64 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). CONCLUSION: In women with kidney disease diagnosed at kidney biopsy, previous preeclampsia does not seem to be a risk marker for progression to ESRD.
PubMed ID
20348149 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prognostic factors in mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31415
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2002 Sep;17(9):1603-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Bjørn Egil Vikse
Leif Bostad
Knut Aasarød
Dag Einar Lysebo
Bjarne M Iversen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Kidney Register, Institute of Medicine, The Gade Institute, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. bjorn.vikse@student.uib.no
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2002 Sep;17(9):1603-13
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biopsy
Blood pressure
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Progression
Female
Glomerulonephritis, Membranoproliferative - mortality - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - analysis
Infant
Kidney Failure, Chronic - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The aim of our study was to examine patients with mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), with or without glomerular IgA deposits, and to analyse the effect of different clinical and histopathological variables at the time of biopsy on progression to end-stage renal failure (ESRF) and death. METHODS: We retrospectively examined 273 patients who got this diagnosis in Norway from April 1988 to December 1990 after a renal biopsy. All patients were followed for a median duration of 34.8 months (0.8-68 months). RESULTS: The mean age at the time of biopsy was 40+/-17 years (range 1.1-79 years). Glomerular IgA deposits were present in 45% of the patients; IgA deposits did not affect prognosis. Three years after the time of biopsy, 7% had developed ESRF (chronic dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation) and 8% had died. By Kaplan-Meier analyses, the following clinical variables indicated progression to ESRF: increased serum creatinine, proteinuria > or =1 g/24 h, systolic blood pressure (BP) > or =160 mmHg, diastolic BP > or =90 mmHg, serum albumin or =60 years. Morphological variables indicating progression to ESRF were presence of focal mesangial sclerosis, focal glomerular crescents or necroses, benign nephrosclerosis and increased interstitial score. In the multivariable analysis, the following variables indicated progression to ESRF: increased serum creatinine (P
PubMed ID
12198211 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.