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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Ancient human genome sequence of an extinct Palaeo-Eskimo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98088
Source
Nature. 2010 Feb 11;463(7282):757-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-11-2010
Author
Morten Rasmussen
Yingrui Li
Stinus Lindgreen
Jakob Skou Pedersen
Anders Albrechtsen
Ida Moltke
Mait Metspalu
Ene Metspalu
Toomas Kivisild
Ramneek Gupta
Marcelo Bertalan
Kasper Nielsen
M Thomas P Gilbert
Yong Wang
Maanasa Raghavan
Paula F Campos
Hanne Munkholm Kamp
Andrew S Wilson
Andrew Gledhill
Silvana Tridico
Michael Bunce
Eline D Lorenzen
Jonas Binladen
Xiaosen Guo
Jing Zhao
Xiuqing Zhang
Hao Zhang
Zhuo Li
Minfeng Chen
Ludovic Orlando
Karsten Kristiansen
Mads Bak
Niels Tommerup
Christian Bendixen
Tracey L Pierre
Bjarne Grønnow
Morten Meldgaard
Claus Andreasen
Sardana A Fedorova
Ludmila P Osipova
Thomas F G Higham
Christopher Bronk Ramsey
Thomas V O Hansen
Finn C Nielsen
Michael H Crawford
Søren Brunak
Thomas Sicheritz-Pontén
Richard Villems
Rasmus Nielsen
Anders Krogh
Jun Wang
Eske Willerslev
Author Affiliation
Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark and Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Nature. 2010 Feb 11;463(7282):757-62
Date
Feb-11-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cryopreservation
Emigration and Immigration - history
Extinction, Biological
Genetics, Population
Genome, Human - genetics
Genomics
Genotype
Greenland
Hair
History, Ancient
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Phenotype
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
We report here the genome sequence of an ancient human. Obtained from approximately 4,000-year-old permafrost-preserved hair, the genome represents a male individual from the first known culture to settle in Greenland. Sequenced to an average depth of 20x, we recover 79% of the diploid genome, an amount close to the practical limit of current sequencing technologies. We identify 353,151 high-confidence single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 6.8% have not been reported previously. We estimate raw read contamination to be no higher than 0.8%. We use functional SNP assessment to assign possible phenotypic characteristics of the individual that belonged to a culture whose location has yielded only trace human remains. We compare the high-confidence SNPs to those of contemporary populations to find the populations most closely related to the individual. This provides evidence for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit.
Notes
RefSource: Nature. 2010 Feb 11;463(7282):739-40
PubMed ID
20148029 View in PubMed
Less detail

The genetic prehistory of the New World Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256691
Source
Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1255832
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-2014
Author
Maanasa Raghavan
Michael DeGiorgio
Anders Albrechtsen
Ida Moltke
Pontus Skoglund
Thorfinn S Korneliussen
Bjarne Grønnow
Martin Appelt
Hans Christian Gulløv
T Max Friesen
William Fitzhugh
Helena Malmström
Simon Rasmussen
Jesper Olsen
Linea Melchior
Benjamin T Fuller
Simon M Fahrni
Thomas Stafford
Vaughan Grimes
M A Priscilla Renouf
Jerome Cybulski
Niels Lynnerup
Marta Mirazon Lahr
Kate Britton
Rick Knecht
Jette Arneborg
Mait Metspalu
Omar E Cornejo
Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas
Yong Wang
Morten Rasmussen
Vibha Raghavan
Thomas V O Hansen
Elza Khusnutdinova
Tracey Pierre
Kirill Dneprovsky
Claus Andreasen
Hans Lange
M Geoffrey Hayes
Joan Coltrain
Victor A Spitsyn
Anders Götherström
Ludovic Orlando
Toomas Kivisild
Richard Villems
Michael H Crawford
Finn C Nielsen
Jørgen Dissing
Jan Heinemeier
Morten Meldgaard
Carlos Bustamante
Dennis H O'Rourke
Mattias Jakobsson
M Thomas P Gilbert
Rasmus Nielsen
Eske Willerslev
Author Affiliation
Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1255832
Date
Aug-29-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Arctic regions - ethnology
Base Sequence
Bone and Bones
Canada - ethnology
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Genome, Human - genetics
Greenland - ethnology
Hair
History, Ancient
Human Migration
Humans
Inuits - ethnology - genetics - history
Molecular Sequence Data
Siberia - ethnology
Survivors - history
Tooth
Abstract
The New World Arctic, the last region of the Americas to be populated by humans, has a relatively well-researched archaeology, but an understanding of its genetic history is lacking. We present genome-wide sequence data from ancient and present-day humans from Greenland, Arctic Canada, Alaska, Aleutian Islands, and Siberia. We show that Paleo-Eskimos (~3000 BCE to 1300 CE) represent a migration pulse into the Americas independent of both Native American and Inuit expansions. Furthermore, the genetic continuity characterizing the Paleo-Eskimo period was interrupted by the arrival of a new population, representing the ancestors of present-day Inuit, with evidence of past gene flow between these lineages. Despite periodic abandonment of major Arctic regions, a single Paleo-Eskimo metapopulation likely survived in near-isolation for more than 4000 years, only to vanish around 700 years ago.
Notes
Comment In: Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1004-525170138
PubMed ID
25170159 View in PubMed
Less detail

The history of seabird colonies and the North Water ecosystem: Contributions from palaeoecological and archaeological evidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290182
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):175-192
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Thomas A Davidson
Sebastian Wetterich
Kasper L Johansen
Bjarne Grønnow
Torben Windirsch
Erik Jeppesen
Jari Syväranta
Jesper Olsen
Ivan González-Bergonzoni
Astrid Strunk
Nicolaj K Larsen
Hanno Meyer
Jens Søndergaard
Rune Dietz
Igor Eulears
Anders Mosbech
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600, Silkeborg, Denmark. thd@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):175-192
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The North Water (NOW) polynya is one of the most productive marine areas of the Arctic and an important breeding area for millions of seabirds. There is, however, little information on the dynamics of the polynya or the bird populations over the long term. Here, we used sediment archives from a lake and peat deposits along the Greenland coast of the NOW polynya to track long-term patterns in the dynamics of the seabird populations. Radiocarbon dates show that the thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) and the common eider (Somateria mollissima) have been present for at least 5500 cal. years. The first recorded arrival of the little auk (Alle alle) was around 4400 cal. years BP at Annikitsoq, with arrival at Qeqertaq (Salve Ø) colony dated to 3600 cal. years BP. Concentrations of cadmium and phosphorus (both abundant in little auk guano) in the lake and peat cores suggest that there was a period of large variation in bird numbers between 2500 and 1500 cal. years BP. The little auk arrival times show a strong accord with past periods of colder climate and with some aspects of human settlement in the area.
Notes
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2009 Feb 7;276(1656):591-6 PMID 18945662
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2017 Feb 22;284(1849): PMID 28202811
Cites: Nature. 2002 Apr 18;416(6882):729-33 PMID 11961553
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):296-309 PMID 29520749
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
Cites: Nature. 2009 Sep 17;461(7262):385-8 PMID 19759618
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Jun 6;114(23 ):5952-5957 PMID 28512225
PubMed ID
29516438 View in PubMed
Less detail

The history of seabird colonies and the North Water ecosystem: Contributions from palaeoecological and archaeological evidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295705
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):175-192
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Thomas A Davidson
Sebastian Wetterich
Kasper L Johansen
Bjarne Grønnow
Torben Windirsch
Erik Jeppesen
Jari Syväranta
Jesper Olsen
Ivan González-Bergonzoni
Astrid Strunk
Nicolaj K Larsen
Hanno Meyer
Jens Søndergaard
Rune Dietz
Igor Eulears
Anders Mosbech
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600, Silkeborg, Denmark. thd@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):175-192
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Charadriiformes
Ecosystem
Greenland
Population Dynamics
Water
Abstract
The North Water (NOW) polynya is one of the most productive marine areas of the Arctic and an important breeding area for millions of seabirds. There is, however, little information on the dynamics of the polynya or the bird populations over the long term. Here, we used sediment archives from a lake and peat deposits along the Greenland coast of the NOW polynya to track long-term patterns in the dynamics of the seabird populations. Radiocarbon dates show that the thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) and the common eider (Somateria mollissima) have been present for at least 5500 cal. years. The first recorded arrival of the little auk (Alle alle) was around 4400 cal. years BP at Annikitsoq, with arrival at Qeqertaq (Salve Ø) colony dated to 3600 cal. years BP. Concentrations of cadmium and phosphorus (both abundant in little auk guano) in the lake and peat cores suggest that there was a period of large variation in bird numbers between 2500 and 1500 cal. years BP. The little auk arrival times show a strong accord with past periods of colder climate and with some aspects of human settlement in the area.
Notes
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2009 Feb 7;276(1656):591-6 PMID 18945662
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2017 Feb 22;284(1849): PMID 28202811
Cites: Nature. 2002 Apr 18;416(6882):729-33 PMID 11961553
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):296-309 PMID 29520749
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
Cites: Nature. 2009 Sep 17;461(7262):385-8 PMID 19759618
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017 Jun 6;114(23 ):5952-5957 PMID 28512225
PubMed ID
29516438 View in PubMed
Less detail

Introducing the North Water: Histories of exploration, ice dynamics, living resources, and human settlement in the Thule Region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290181
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):162-174
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Kirsten Hastrup
Anders Mosbech
Bjarne Grønnow
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. kirsten.hastrup@anthro.ku.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):162-174
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The North Water is a recurrent polynya in the High Arctic situated between Northwest Greenland and Ellesmere Island of Canada. The North Water makes a dynamic space, where various processes may enhance or obstruct each other, accelerating or halting particular modes of human-animal relations in the region, where life itself depends on the North Water. This will be discussed in four steps. The first step posits the North Water as a perceived oasis for explorers and whalers hailing from Europe or America in the nineteenth century. The second step concentrates on the diverse rhythms inherent in the ice conditions, as affected by trends that are set in motion elsewhere. The third step highlights the implications of the dynamics of the ice and sea currents for animal life in the region. The fourth step gives an overview of human settlement patterns around the North Water across the ages. The article shows how natural and social features are deeply implicated in each other, even if they are not directly co-variant.
Notes
Cites: Ambio. 2013 Sep;42(5):596-610 PMID 23271401
Cites: Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1255832 PMID 25170159
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):244-264 PMID 29520751
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):296-309 PMID 29520749
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):193-212 PMID 29516441
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):213-225 PMID 29520750
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):281-295 PMID 29516443
Cites: Nature. 2002 Nov 14;420(6912):168-71 PMID 12432390
PubMed ID
29516442 View in PubMed
Less detail

Introducing the North Water: Histories of exploration, ice dynamics, living resources, and human settlement in the Thule Region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295702
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):162-174
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Kirsten Hastrup
Anders Mosbech
Bjarne Grønnow
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. kirsten.hastrup@anthro.ku.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):162-174
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Europe
Greenland
Human Activities
Humans
Ice
Ice Cover
Water
Abstract
The North Water is a recurrent polynya in the High Arctic situated between Northwest Greenland and Ellesmere Island of Canada. The North Water makes a dynamic space, where various processes may enhance or obstruct each other, accelerating or halting particular modes of human-animal relations in the region, where life itself depends on the North Water. This will be discussed in four steps. The first step posits the North Water as a perceived oasis for explorers and whalers hailing from Europe or America in the nineteenth century. The second step concentrates on the diverse rhythms inherent in the ice conditions, as affected by trends that are set in motion elsewhere. The third step highlights the implications of the dynamics of the ice and sea currents for animal life in the region. The fourth step gives an overview of human settlement patterns around the North Water across the ages. The article shows how natural and social features are deeply implicated in each other, even if they are not directly co-variant.
Notes
Cites: Ambio. 2013 Sep;42(5):596-610 PMID 23271401
Cites: Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1255832 PMID 25170159
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):244-264 PMID 29520751
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):296-309 PMID 29520749
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):193-212 PMID 29516441
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):213-225 PMID 29520750
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):281-295 PMID 29516443
Cites: Nature. 2002 Nov 14;420(6912):168-71 PMID 12432390
PubMed ID
29516442 View in PubMed
Less detail

Life around the North Water ecosystem: Natural and social drivers of change over a millennium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290174
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):213-225
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Kirsten Hastrup
Astrid Oberborbeck Andersen
Bjarne Grønnow
Mads Peter Heide-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. kirsten.hastrup@anthro.ku.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):213-225
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The formation of the North Water in Smith Sound about 4500 years ago, as evidenced by the establishment of bird colonies and human presence, also initiated a long-term anthropogenic agent as part of this High Arctic ecosystem. Different epochs have influenced the human occupation in the area: immigration pulses from Canada and Alaska, trade with meteorite iron throughout the Arctic, introduction of new technologies by whalers and explorers, exploitation of resources by foreigners, political sequestration, export of fox and seal skins and later narwhal products, and recently fishing. Physical drivers in terms of weather and climate affecting the northern hemisphere also impact accessibility and productivity of the ecosystem, with cascading effects on social drivers, again acting back on the natural ecologies. Despite its apparent isolation, the ecosystem had and still has wide ranging spatial ramifications that extend beyond the High Arctic, and include human activity. The challenge is to determine what is internal and what is external to an ecosystem.
Notes
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):175-192 PMID 29516438
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):244-264 PMID 29520751
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):193-212 PMID 29516441
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):265-280 PMID 29516444
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):162-174 PMID 29516442
PubMed ID
29520750 View in PubMed
Less detail

Life around the North Water ecosystem: Natural and social drivers of change over a millennium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295698
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):213-225
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Kirsten Hastrup
Astrid Oberborbeck Andersen
Bjarne Grønnow
Mads Peter Heide-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. kirsten.hastrup@anthro.ku.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):213-225
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Humans
Abstract
The formation of the North Water in Smith Sound about 4500 years ago, as evidenced by the establishment of bird colonies and human presence, also initiated a long-term anthropogenic agent as part of this High Arctic ecosystem. Different epochs have influenced the human occupation in the area: immigration pulses from Canada and Alaska, trade with meteorite iron throughout the Arctic, introduction of new technologies by whalers and explorers, exploitation of resources by foreigners, political sequestration, export of fox and seal skins and later narwhal products, and recently fishing. Physical drivers in terms of weather and climate affecting the northern hemisphere also impact accessibility and productivity of the ecosystem, with cascading effects on social drivers, again acting back on the natural ecologies. Despite its apparent isolation, the ecosystem had and still has wide ranging spatial ramifications that extend beyond the High Arctic, and include human activity. The challenge is to determine what is internal and what is external to an ecosystem.
Notes
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):175-192 PMID 29516438
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):244-264 PMID 29520751
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):193-212 PMID 29516441
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):265-280 PMID 29516444
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):162-174 PMID 29516442
PubMed ID
29520750 View in PubMed
Less detail

Living in an oasis: Rapid transformations, resilience, and resistance in the North Water Area societies and ecosystems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290175
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):296-309
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Erik Jeppesen
Martin Appelt
Kirsten Hastrup
Bjarne Grønnow
Anders Mosbech
John P Smol
Thomas A Davidson
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600, Silkeborg, Denmark. ej@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):296-309
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Based on lake sediment data, archaeological findings, and historical records, we describe rapid transformations, resilience and resistance in societies and ecosystems, and their interactions in the past in the North Water area related to changes in climate and historical events. Examples are the formation of the polynya itself and the early arrival of people, ca. 4500 years ago, and later major human immigrations (different societies, cultural encounters, or abandonment) from other regions in the Arctic. While the early immigrations had relatively modest and localised effect on the ecosystem, the later-incoming culture in the early thirteenth century was marked by extensive migrations into and out of the area and abrupt shifts in hunting technologies. This has had long-lasting consequences for the local lake ecosystems. Large natural transformations in the ecosystems have also occurred over relatively short time periods related to changes in the polynya. Finally, we discuss the future perspectives for the North Water area given the many threats, but also opportunities.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1255832 PMID 25170159
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):175-192 PMID 29516438
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2017 Feb 22;284(1849): PMID 28202811
Cites: Soc Stud Sci. 2008 Jun;38(3):351-76 PMID 19069077
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2009 Jan;24(1):49-57 PMID 18952317
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):162-174 PMID 29516442
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):96-105 PMID 22270709
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):66-74 PMID 22270706
Cites: Ecol Appl. 2014 Dec 1;24(8):2063-2077 PMID 27053913
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2013 Jul 08;368(1624):20120479 PMID 23836785
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Feb 10;101(6):1613-7 PMID 14745043
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):1-9 PMID 22270702
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):56-65 PMID 22270705
Cites: PLoS One. 2017 Mar 16;12 (3):e0173812 PMID 28301560
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):75-84 PMID 22270707
Cites: Hum Nat. 2012 Dec;23(4):419-46 PMID 23054998
PubMed ID
29520749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Living in an oasis: Rapid transformations, resilience, and resistance in the North Water Area societies and ecosystems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295699
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):296-309
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Erik Jeppesen
Martin Appelt
Kirsten Hastrup
Bjarne Grønnow
Anders Mosbech
John P Smol
Thomas A Davidson
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600, Silkeborg, Denmark. ej@bios.au.dk.
Source
Ambio. 2018 Apr; 47(Suppl 2):296-309
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Ecosystem
Fresh Water
Human Activities
Humans
Abstract
Based on lake sediment data, archaeological findings, and historical records, we describe rapid transformations, resilience and resistance in societies and ecosystems, and their interactions in the past in the North Water area related to changes in climate and historical events. Examples are the formation of the polynya itself and the early arrival of people, ca. 4500 years ago, and later major human immigrations (different societies, cultural encounters, or abandonment) from other regions in the Arctic. While the early immigrations had relatively modest and localised effect on the ecosystem, the later-incoming culture in the early thirteenth century was marked by extensive migrations into and out of the area and abrupt shifts in hunting technologies. This has had long-lasting consequences for the local lake ecosystems. Large natural transformations in the ecosystems have also occurred over relatively short time periods related to changes in the polynya. Finally, we discuss the future perspectives for the North Water area given the many threats, but also opportunities.
Notes
Cites: Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1255832 PMID 25170159
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):175-192 PMID 29516438
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2017 Feb 22;284(1849): PMID 28202811
Cites: Soc Stud Sci. 2008 Jun;38(3):351-76 PMID 19069077
Cites: Trends Ecol Evol. 2009 Jan;24(1):49-57 PMID 18952317
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):226-243 PMID 29516440
Cites: Ambio. 2018 Apr;47(Suppl 2):162-174 PMID 29516442
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):96-105 PMID 22270709
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):66-74 PMID 22270706
Cites: Ecol Appl. 2014 Dec 1;24(8):2063-2077 PMID 27053913
Cites: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2013 Jul 08;368(1624):20120479 PMID 23836785
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Feb 10;101(6):1613-7 PMID 14745043
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):1-9 PMID 22270702
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):56-65 PMID 22270705
Cites: PLoS One. 2017 Mar 16;12 (3):e0173812 PMID 28301560
Cites: Ambio. 2012 Feb;41(1):75-84 PMID 22270707
Cites: Hum Nat. 2012 Dec;23(4):419-46 PMID 23054998
PubMed ID
29520749 View in PubMed
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.