Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Changes in food habits and motivation for healthy eating among Pakistani women living in Norway: results from the InnvaDiab-DEPLAN study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94681
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Nov 27;:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2009
Author
JohansenKarianne S
BjørgeBenedikte
Telle HjellsetVictoria
Holmboe-OttesenGerd
RåbergMarte
WandelMargareta
Author Affiliation
1Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PB 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2009 Nov 27;:1-10
Date
Nov-27-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Pakistani women in Oslo have high risk of overweight and type 2 diabetes. The objective is to present the effect of an intervention study on Pakistani women's intentions to change dietary behaviour and changes made in dietary intake. DESIGN: The intervention group received culturally adapted lifestyle education, including diet and physical activity. The questionnaire, applied before and after the 7-month intervention, included FFQ and questions on intentions to change. SETTING: Oslo, Norway. SUBJECTS: A total of 198 Pakistani women, aged 25-63 years, randomised into control and intervention groups. RESULTS: There was a shift in distribution of intentions to change the intake of selected foods in the intervention group after the intervention, resulting in significant differences between the groups. The daily intake of vegetables, fruits and fruit juice had increased (P = 0.043), and the intake of red meats (P = 0.001), full fat milk/yoghurt (P = 0.027) and sugar-rich drinks (P
PubMed ID
19941691 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes Among Female Pakistani Immigrants: The InvaDiab-DEPLAN Study on Pakistani Immigrant Women Living in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94182
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2009 Sep 25;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2009
Author
HjellsetVictoria
BjørgeBenedikte
EriksenHege
HøstmarkArne
Author Affiliation
Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Box 1130, 0318, Blindern, Oslo, Norway, v.t.hjellset@medisin.uio.no.
Source
J Immigr Minor Health. 2009 Sep 25;
Date
Sep-25-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Pakistani immigrants is high. The aim of this study was to provide an update of the risk of T2D and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in female Pakistani immigrants living in Oslo, Norway. Female Pakistani immigrants (n = 198, age 25-63) were interviewed, and data related to T2D, including anthropometric measurements, blood data, heart rate, and level of physical activity, were determined. Ninety-eight pecentage had body mass index (BMI > 23 kg m(-2)) and 39% were obese (BMI >/= 30). Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) was found in 37%, MetS in 41%, and T2D in 13%, using fasting glucose. By score evaluation, approximately 90% had risk of T2D. The participants had low energy expenditure, despite acceptable number of steps walked during a day. The risk of T2D is very high in female Pakistani immigrants in Oslo.
PubMed ID
19779820 View in PubMed
Less detail