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Efficacy and safety of transscleral cyclophotocoagulation in Swedish glaucoma patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299522
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2019 Apr 26; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-26-2019
Author
Erika Rasmuson
Christina Lindén
Björn Lundberg
Gauti Jóhannesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2019 Apr 26; :
Date
Apr-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of all transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TCP) treatments performed during a 5-year period.
Medical records of all patients, who had undergone TCP treatment between 2010 and 2014 at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, were evaluated. Clinical data including intraocular pressure (IOP), visual acuity (VA), number of topical glaucoma medications, use of oral acetazolamide, retreatments and complications during a 2-year follow-up were registered. Global success was defined as IOP 6-18 mmHg with or without glaucoma medication.
Three hundred patients underwent TCP during the time period. Mean IOP at baseline was 29.3 ± 11.0 (mean ± standard deviation) mmHg (n = 297) with a mean reduction of 11.5 (±12.0) mmHg at 1 year (n = 258; p 
PubMed ID
31025793 View in PubMed
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Efficacy and safety of transscleral cyclophotocoagulation in Swedish glaucoma patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309553
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2019 Dec; 97(8):764-770
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Erika Rasmuson
Christina Lindén
Björn Lundberg
Gauti Jóhannesson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Ophthalmology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2019 Dec; 97(8):764-770
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Ciliary Body - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glaucoma - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Laser Coagulation - methods
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures - methods
Retrospective Studies
Sclera
Sweden - epidemiology
Tonometry, Ocular
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Abstract
To retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of all transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TCP) treatments performed during a 5-year period.
Medical records of all patients, who had undergone TCP treatment between 2010 and 2014 at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, were evaluated. Clinical data including intraocular pressure (IOP), visual acuity (VA), number of topical glaucoma medications, use of oral acetazolamide, retreatments and complications during a 2-year follow-up were registered. Global success was defined as IOP 6-18 mmHg with or without glaucoma medication.
Three hundred patients underwent TCP during the time period. Mean IOP at baseline was 29.3 ± 11.0 (mean ± standard deviation) mmHg (n = 297) with a mean reduction of 11.5 (±12.0) mmHg at 1 year (n = 258; p 
PubMed ID
31025793 View in PubMed
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Hospital-assisted home care after early discharge from a Swedish neonatal intensive care unit was safe and readmissions were rare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280860
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 Aug;105(8):895-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Björn Lundberg
Carl Lindgren
Charlotte Palme-Kilander
Annica Örtenstrand
Anna-Karin Edstedt Bonamy
Ihsan Sarman
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2016 Aug;105(8):895-901
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
It is common in Sweden to discharge infants early from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and provide hospital-assisted neonatal home care (HANHC), as an alternative to hospital care, for infants with a persisting need for specialised care. This study assessed the safety of HANHC by reviewing hospital readmissions.
We retrospectively reviewed the files of all 1410 infants enrolled in HANHC at the NICU at Sachs' Children's Hospital, Stockholm, from 2002 to 2011 up until hospital readmission or their discharge from HANHC. Each readmitted infant was matched to the next HANHC infant who was not readmitted. Predictors and reasons for readmission were investigated in a retrospective nested case-control study.
We readmitted 74 (5.2%) of the 1410 infants in HANHC. Extremely preterm infants, born at less than 28 weeks, were readmitted more frequently than other infants, with an odds ratio of 6.07 (range 2.06-17.8). The most common symptoms were respiratory symptoms (55%), and viral respiratory tract infections were the most common reason (28%) for readmission.
HANHC was safe for the vast majority of infants (94.8%). Extremely preterm birth was identified as a predictor for hospital readmission. Further studies investigating the safety of HANHC in other settings would be valuable.
PubMed ID
26947937 View in PubMed
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Intracameral mydriatics in phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9552
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2003 Dec;29(12):2366-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Björn Lundberg
Anders Behndig
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science/Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2003 Dec;29(12):2366-71
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Topical
Aged
Anterior Chamber - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Cell Count
Cyclopentolate - administration & dosage
Double-Blind Method
Drug Evaluation
Drug Therapy, Combination
Endothelium, Corneal - drug effects - pathology
Humans
Injections
Intraocular Pressure - drug effects - physiology
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lidocaine - administration & dosage
Mydriatics - administration & dosage
Ophthalmic Solutions - administration & dosage
Phacoemulsification
Phenylephrine - administration & dosage
Prospective Studies
Pupil - drug effects
Visual Acuity - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate intracameral injection of mydriatics in phacoemulsification cataract surgery and compare the results with those of conventional topical mydriatics. SETTING: Department of Clinical Science/Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. METHODS: This prospective randomized double-blind study included 60 patients who were given topical (topical group) or intracameral (intracameral group) mydriatics. The topical mydriatics comprised 3 drops of cyclopentolate 1% and phenylephrine 10% given 15 minutes apart and 150 microL intracameral lidocaine hydrochloride 1% (Xylocaine) and the intracameral mydriatics, placebo eyedrops and 150 microL intracameral cyclopentolate 0.1%, phenylephrine 1.5%, and Xylocaine 1%. The pupil size was recorded preoperatively, throughout surgery, and 1 day and 1 month postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative corneal endothelial morphology, corneal thickness, intraocular pressure, visual acuity, aqueous cells and flare, phacoemulsification energy, duration of surgery, pulse, blood pressure, and intraoperative sensation of pain and glare were also recorded. RESULTS: With intracameral mydriatics, mydriasis reached 95% +/- 3% (SD) of its final value within 20 seconds. In the intracameral group, the pupils were smaller than in the topical group (mean 6.7 +/- 1.0 mm versus 7.7 +/- 1.0 mm, P
PubMed ID
14709298 View in PubMed
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Mydriatic response to different concentrations of intracameral phenylephrine in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140518
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010 Oct;36(10):1682-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Anders Behndig
Björn Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science/Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. anders.behndig@ophthal.umu.se
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2010 Oct;36(10):1682-6
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anterior Chamber - drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Injections
Male
Mydriatics - administration & dosage
Phacoemulsification
Phenylephrine - administration & dosage
Prospective Studies
Pupil - drug effects
Abstract
To assess the mydriatic response to concentrations of intracamerally injected phenylephrine from 0.15 mg/mL to 30.00 mg/mL (0.015% to 3.000%) in human eyes.
Department of Clinical Science/Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Comparative case series.
This prospective randomized double-masked study comprised patients scheduled for phacoemulsification cataract surgery. At the beginning of the procedure, patients received an intracameral injection of 0.15 mL of phenylephrine 0.15, 0.5, 1.5, 5.0, 15.0, or 30.0 mg/mL. To assess the mydriatic response, the pupil size was registered over 60 seconds using digital video recording. Then, the surgery was performed in the standard manner.
The study evaluated 42 patients. The mydriatic response was almost identical at the 4 lower phenylephrine concentrations (0.15 to 5.00 mg/mL; 0.015% to 0.500%), with final pupil sizes of approximately 4.3 mm. The 2 higher concentrations gave significantly larger pupils as follows: mean 5.80 mm ± 0.79 (SD) for 15.0 mg/mL (1.5%) and 6.65 mm ± 0.57 for 30.0 mg/mL (3.0%).
Results show that phenylephrine injected intracamerally does not have a linear mydriatic dose-response relationship in humans. At very high concentrations, phenylephrine may bind to and stimulate receptors other than the a(1)-receptor, explaining this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
20870113 View in PubMed
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Optical coherence tomography evaluation of macular edema after phacoemulsification surgery with intracameral mydriatics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162217
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2007 Aug;33(8):1436-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Magdalena Johansson
Björn Lundberg
Anders Behndig
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences/Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2007 Aug;33(8):1436-41
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anterior Chamber - drug effects
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lidocaine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Macular Edema - chemically induced - diagnosis
Male
Mydriatics - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Phacoemulsification
Phenylephrine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Pupil - drug effects
Retina - drug effects - pathology
Tomography, Optical Coherence - methods
Abstract
To quantify the macular edema induced by intracameral mydriatics in phacoemulsification surgery.
University hospital eye clinic, Umeå, Sweden.
In a randomized study of 22 patients, 11 patients were given 150 muL of a mixture of phenylephrine 1.5% and lidocaine 1% intracamerally for mydriasis and anesthesia. In a control group (n = 11), conventional topical mydriatics and intracameral lidocaine were given. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were recorded.
There were no differences in macular edema between the 2 treatments. A correlation was seen between macular edema and impaired visual acuity 1 week postoperatively. On the first postoperative day, a similar correlation was seen between corneal edema and the degree of visual improvement.
Intracameral lidocaine and phenylephrine for mydriasis and anesthesia did not induce more significant macular edema than the standard regimen of topical mydriatics plus intracameral lidocaine. Macular edema limited visual improvement 1 week after phacoemulsification, while corneal edema appeared to have a larger effect immediately after surgery.
PubMed ID
17662438 View in PubMed
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Transient corneal edema after phacoemulsification: comparison of 3 viscoelastic regimens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50743
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2002 Sep;28(9):1551-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Anders Behndig
Björn Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Science/Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. anders.behndig@hotmail.com
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2002 Sep;28(9):1551-6
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chondroitin - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Cornea - drug effects - ultrasonography
Corneal Edema - etiology - ultrasonography
Drug Combinations
Humans
Hyaluronic Acid - therapeutic use
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Phacoemulsification - adverse effects - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of different viscoelastic substances on the grade and time course of postoperative corneal edema. SETTING: Department of Clinical Sciences/Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. METHODS: This study comprised 62 patients with otherwise healthy eyes who had routine phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 was given Healon GV (sodium hyaluronate 1.4%) at phacoemulsification and IOL implantation. Group 2 was given Viscoat (sodium hyaluronate 3.0%-chondroitin sulfate 4.0%) at phacoemulsification and Healon GV at IOL implantation. Group 3 was given Viscoat at phacoemulsification and Provisc (sodium hyaluronate 1.0%) at lens implantation. The central corneal thickness was measured with ultrasonic pachymetry before surgery and 5 and 24 hours, 1 week, and 1 month after surgery. RESULTS: The mean increase in corneal thickness was significantly greater in Group 1 than in the other 2 groups 5 and 24 hours and 1 week after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The transient postoperative increase in central corneal thickness was greater in patients receiving Healon GV during phacoemulsification than in patients receiving Viscoat. The use of Provisc or Healon GV for IOL implantation did not affect the postoperative corneal thickness when Viscoat was used for phacoemulsification. The time course of the edema may be explained by a difference between the 2 agents in endothelial protection from ultrasonic, mechanical, or irrigation trauma.
PubMed ID
12231309 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.