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EUROQUEST--a questionnaire for solvent related symptoms: factor structure, item analysis and predictive validity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74940
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2002 Dec;23(6):711-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Ned Carter
Anders Iregren
Erik Söderman
Birgitta Anshelm Olson
Björn Karlson
Birgitta Lindelöf
Ingvar Lundberg
Kai Osterberg
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. ned.carter@medsci.uu.se
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2002 Dec;23(6):711-7
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Neurotoxicity Syndromes - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Paint - toxicity
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Solvents - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The study evaluates the factor structure and predictive validity of the symptom questionnaire EUROQUEST (EQ) that had been developed with the goal of simplifying the evaluation of health effects associated with long-term solvent exposure. The EQ was added to the normal evaluation procedures for 118 male patients with suspected solvent-induced toxic encephalopathy (TE) referred to seven Swedish clinics of occupational medicine during an 18-month period. EQ was also completed by 239 males from a random sample of 400 Swedish males aged 25-64 years selected from the general population and a sample of 559 occupationally active male spray painters aged 25-64 years. Factor and item analyses of EQ responses were performed. Ordinary least square regression analysis was used to evaluate sensitivity and correlation to evaluate the specificity of EQ and the separate components. Questions concerning memory and concentration symptoms alone showed better sensitivity than the other five EQ dimensions singly or combined for the entire EQ and for a subset of questions approximating Q16, a widely used organic solvent symptom screening questionnaire. However, the diagnosis of TE required information in addition to exposure and responses to EQ and Q16-like questions. The results indicate that the subset of EQ questions concerning memory and concentration might replace the more cumbersome EQ and less sensitive Q16 in screening for TE, although none of the screening instruments alone replaces current clinical diagnostic procedures.
PubMed ID
12520761 View in PubMed
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Multiple chemical sensitivity in male painters; a controlled provocation study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45864
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Oct;206(6):531-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Antonis Georgellis
Birgitta Lindelöf
Anders Lundin
Bengt Arnetz
Lena Hillert
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden. antonis.georgellis@smd.sll.se
Source
Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2003 Oct;206(6):531-8
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Chemical Sensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - psychology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - pathology - psychology
Paint - adverse effects
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine whether male painters reporting multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) differ from their matched controls (male painters without such sensitivity) during controlled chamber challenges to singular and mixtures of odorous chemicals with respect to: (1) Subjective rating of symptoms (i.e., symptoms related to central nervous system (CNS) and symptoms related to irritation) and sensations of smell elicited by low-level chemical exposures. (2) Changes in serum prolactin and cortisol levels, changes in nasal cavity and eye redness as a result of the various exposures. Moreover, background assessments were made regarding mental well-being, sense of coherence (SOC) as well as state of anxiety and depression in both groups. The MCS and control group consisted of 14 and 15 male painters respectively. Regarding background assessments of mental well-being, anxiety, depression and SOC, statistically significant differences were obtained between painters with MCS and their controls. During the controlled chamber challenges, neither difference regarding sensations of smell nor development of CNS related symptoms were seen between MCS and control group. In contrast, subjective rating of symptoms related to irritation (i.e., eyes, nose, throat, skin, and breathing difficulties) was significant higher in subjects with MCS. No differences between the groups as a result of the different exposures were seen concerning nasal cavity, eye redness and serum cortisol levels. However, a trend (P = 0.056) between the groups was measured regarding a decline of serum prolactin levels in the MCS group. This is a relatively small study with a limited number of volunteers; and no definitive conclusions can be drawn concerning the above findings. But it is the first controlled challenge study that incorporates similarly exposed groups (painters) recruited from a community rather than from a clinical population.
PubMed ID
14626900 View in PubMed
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