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Creating Qungasvik (a Yup'ik intervention "toolbox"): case examples from a community-developed and culturally-driven intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266108
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):140-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Stacy M Rasmus
Billy Charles
Gerald V Mohatt
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):140-52
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Child
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Cooperative Behavior
Culture
Female
Humans
Inuits - ethnology
Male
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Suicide - prevention & control
Abstract
This paper describes the development of a Yup'ik Alaska Native approach to suicide and alcohol abuse prevention that resulted in the creation of the Qungasvik, a toolbox promoting reasons for life and sobriety among youth. The Qungasvik is made up of thirty-six modules that function as cultural scripts for creating experiences in Yup'ik communities that build strengths and protection against suicide and alcohol abuse. The Qungasvik manual represents the results of a community based participatory research intervention development process grounded in culture and local process, and nurtured through a syncretic blending of Indigenous and Western theories and practices. This paper will provide a description of the collaborative steps taken at the community-level to develop the intervention modules. This process involved university researchers and community members coming together and drawing from multiple sources of data and knowledge to inform the development of prevention activities addressing youth suicide and alcohol abuse. We will present case examples describing the development of three keystone modules; Qasgiq (The Men's House), Yup'ik Kinship Terms, and Surviving Your Feelings. These modules each are representative of the process that the community co-researcher team took to develop and implement protective experiences that: (1) create supportive community, (2) strengthen families, and (3) give individuals tools to be healthy and strong.
Notes
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):100-1124903819
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2006 Jul;7(3):312-2316760238
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2009;16(1):1-2419340763
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;51(3):387-40623765681
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):153-6924952248
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):112-2424748283
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2009 Jun;43(3-4):232-4019387821
PubMed ID
24764018 View in PubMed
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Growing from Our Roots: Strategies for Developing Culturally Grounded Health Promotion Interventions in American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309708
Source
Prev Sci. 2020 01; 21(Suppl 1):54-64
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
01-2020
Author
Karina L Walters
Michelle Johnson-Jennings
Sandra Stroud
Stacy Rasmus
Billy Charles
Simeon John
James Allen
Joseph Keawe'aimoku Kaholokula
Mele A Look
Mapuana de Silva
John Lowe
Julie A Baldwin
Gary Lawrence
Jada Brooks
Curtis W Noonan
Annie Belcourt
Eugenia Quintana
Erin O Semmens
Johna Boulafentis
Author Affiliation
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI), School of Social Work, University of Washington, Box 354900, Seattle, WA, 98105-6299, USA. kw5@uw.edu.
Source
Prev Sci. 2020 01; 21(Suppl 1):54-64
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Cultural Competency
Female
Health equity
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Program Development - methods
United States
Abstract
Given the paucity of empirically based health promotion interventions designed by and for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian (i.e., Native) communities, researchers and partnering communities have had to rely on the adaptation of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) designed for non-Native populations, a decidedly sub-optimal approach. Native communities have called for development of Indigenous health promotion programs in which their cultural worldviews and protocols are prioritized in the design, development, testing, and implementation. There is limited information regarding how Native communities and scholars have successfully collaborated to design and implement culturally based prevention efforts "from the ground up." Drawing on five diverse community-based Native health intervention studies, we describe strategies for designing and implementing culturally grounded models of health promotion developed in partnership with Native communities. Additionally, we highlight indigenist worldviews and protocols that undergird Native health interventions with an emphasis on the incorporation of (1) original instructions, (2) relational restoration, (3) narrative-[em]bodied transformation, and (4) indigenist community-based participatory research (ICBPR) processes. Finally, we demonstrate how culturally grounded interventions can improve population health when they prioritize local Indigenous knowledge and health-positive messages for individual to multi-level community interventions.
PubMed ID
30397737 View in PubMed
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Growing from Our Roots: Strategies for Developing Culturally Grounded Health Promotion Interventions in American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295797
Source
Prev Sci. 2018 Nov 06; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-06-2018
Author
Karina L Walters
Michelle Johnson-Jennings
Sandra Stroud
Stacy Rasmus
Billy Charles
Simeon John
James Allen
Joseph Keawe'aimoku Kaholokula
Mele A Look
Mapuana de Silva
John Lowe
Julie A Baldwin
Gary Lawrence
Jada Brooks
Curtis W Noonan
Annie Belcourt
Eugenia Quintana
Erin O Semmens
Johna Boulafentis
Author Affiliation
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI), School of Social Work, University of Washington, Box 354900, Seattle, WA, 98105-6299, USA. kw5@uw.edu.
Source
Prev Sci. 2018 Nov 06; :
Date
Nov-06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Given the paucity of empirically based health promotion interventions designed by and for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian (i.e., Native) communities, researchers and partnering communities have had to rely on the adaptation of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) designed for non-Native populations, a decidedly sub-optimal approach. Native communities have called for development of Indigenous health promotion programs in which their cultural worldviews and protocols are prioritized in the design, development, testing, and implementation. There is limited information regarding how Native communities and scholars have successfully collaborated to design and implement culturally based prevention efforts "from the ground up." Drawing on five diverse community-based Native health intervention studies, we describe strategies for designing and implementing culturally grounded models of health promotion developed in partnership with Native communities. Additionally, we highlight indigenist worldviews and protocols that undergird Native health interventions with an emphasis on the incorporation of (1) original instructions, (2) relational restoration, (3) narrative-[em]bodied transformation, and (4) indigenist community-based participatory research (ICBPR) processes. Finally, we demonstrate how culturally grounded interventions can improve population health when they prioritize local Indigenous knowledge and health-positive messages for individual to multi-level community interventions.
PubMed ID
30397737 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multi-Level Cultural Intervention for the Prevention of Suicide and Alcohol Use Risk with Alaska Native Youth: a Nonrandomized Comparison of Treatment Intensity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299951
Source
Prev Sci. 2018 02; 19(2):174-185
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
02-2018
Author
James Allen
Stacy M Rasmus
Carlotta Ching Ting Fok
Billy Charles
David Henry
Author Affiliation
Department of Biobehavioral Health and Population Sciences, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus, Duluth, MN, 55812-3301, USA. jallen@umn.edu.
Source
Prev Sci. 2018 02; 19(2):174-185
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Alaska Natives - psychology
Child
Community Networks
Community-Based Participatory Research
Female
Humans
Male
Psychometrics
Suicide - prevention & control
Surveys and Questionnaires
Underage Drinking - prevention & control
Abstract
Suicide and alcohol use disorders are primary determinants of health disparity among Alaska Native people in contrast to the US general population. Qungasvik, a Yup'ik word for toolbox, is a strengths-based, multi-level, community/cultural intervention for rural Yup'ik youth ages 12-18. The intervention uses "culture as intervention" to promote reasons for life and sobriety in young people using local expertise, high levels of community direction, and community based staff. The intervention is grounded in local practices and adaptive to local cultural differences distinctive to rural Yup'ik communities. The current study compares the effectiveness of high-intensity intervention in one community (treatment), operationalized as a high number of intervention activities, or modules, implemented and attended by youth, contrasted to a lower intensity intervention in a second community (comparison) that implemented fewer modules. A Yup'ik Indigenous theory of change developed through previous qualitative and quantitative work guides intervention. In the model, direct intervention effects on proximal or intermediate variables constituting protective factors at the individual, family, community, and peer influences levels lead to later change on the ultimate prevention outcome variables of Reasons for Life protective from suicide risk and Reflective Processes about alcohol use consequences protective from alcohol risk. Mixed effects regression models contrasted treatment and comparison arms, and identified significant intervention effects on Reasons for Life (d = 0.27, p 
PubMed ID
28786044 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multi-Level Cultural Intervention for the Prevention of Suicide and Alcohol Use Risk with Alaska Native Youth: a Nonrandomized Comparison of Treatment Intensity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284837
Source
Prev Sci. 2017 Aug 07;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-07-2017
Author
James Allen
Stacy M Rasmus
Carlotta Ching Ting Fok
Billy Charles
David Henry
Source
Prev Sci. 2017 Aug 07;
Date
Aug-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Suicide and alcohol use disorders are primary determinants of health disparity among Alaska Native people in contrast to the US general population. Qungasvik, a Yup'ik word for toolbox, is a strengths-based, multi-level, community/cultural intervention for rural Yup'ik youth ages 12-18. The intervention uses "culture as intervention" to promote reasons for life and sobriety in young people using local expertise, high levels of community direction, and community based staff. The intervention is grounded in local practices and adaptive to local cultural differences distinctive to rural Yup'ik communities. The current study compares the effectiveness of high-intensity intervention in one community (treatment), operationalized as a high number of intervention activities, or modules, implemented and attended by youth, contrasted to a lower intensity intervention in a second community (comparison) that implemented fewer modules. A Yup'ik Indigenous theory of change developed through previous qualitative and quantitative work guides intervention. In the model, direct intervention effects on proximal or intermediate variables constituting protective factors at the individual, family, community, and peer influences levels lead to later change on the ultimate prevention outcome variables of Reasons for Life protective from suicide risk and Reflective Processes about alcohol use consequences protective from alcohol risk. Mixed effects regression models contrasted treatment and comparison arms, and identified significant intervention effects on Reasons for Life (d = 0.27, p 
PubMed ID
28786044 View in PubMed
Less detail

The qasgiq model as an indigenous intervention: Using the cultural logic of contexts to build protective factors for Alaska Native suicide and alcohol misuse prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297988
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Stacy M Rasmus
Edison Trickett
Billy Charles
Simeon John
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The foundational role culture and Indigenous knowledge (IK) occupy within community intervention in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) communities is explored. To do this, we define community or complex interventions, then critically examine ways culture is translated into health interventions addressing AIAN disparities in existing programs and research initiatives. We then describe an Indigenous intervention based in the cultural logic of its contexts, as developed by Alaska Native communities. Yup'ik coauthors and knowledge keepers provided their critical and theoretical perspectives and understandings to the overall narrative, constructing from their IK system an argument that culture is prevention.
The intervention, the Qungasvik (phonetic: koo ngaz vik; "tools for life") intervention, is organized and delivered through a Yup'ik Alaska Native process the communities term qasgiq (phonetic: kuz gik; "communal house"). We describe a theory of change framework built around the qasgiq model and explore ways this Indigenous intervention mobilizes aspects of traditional Yup'ik cultural logic to deliver strengths-based interventions for Yup'ik youth. This framework encompasses both an IK theory-driven intervention implementation schema and an IK approach to knowledge production. This intervention and its framework provide a set of recommendations to guide researchers and Indigenous communities who seek to create Indigenously informed and locally sustainable strategies for the promotion of health and well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
30714766 View in PubMed
Less detail

The qasgiq model as an indigenous intervention: Using the cultural logic of contexts to build protective factors for Alaska Native suicide and alcohol misuse prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299090
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2019
Author
Stacy M Rasmus
Edison Trickett
Billy Charles
Simeon John
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2019 Jan; 25(1):44-54
Date
Jan-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Adolescent Development
Alaska Natives - psychology
Alcoholism - ethnology - prevention & control
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Female
Humans
Protective factors
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Suicide - ethnology - prevention & control
Translating
Abstract
The foundational role culture and Indigenous knowledge (IK) occupy within community intervention in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) communities is explored. To do this, we define community or complex interventions, then critically examine ways culture is translated into health interventions addressing AIAN disparities in existing programs and research initiatives. We then describe an Indigenous intervention based in the cultural logic of its contexts, as developed by Alaska Native communities. Yup'ik coauthors and knowledge keepers provided their critical and theoretical perspectives and understandings to the overall narrative, constructing from their IK system an argument that culture is prevention.
The intervention, the Qungasvik (phonetic: koo ngaz vik; "tools for life") intervention, is organized and delivered through a Yup'ik Alaska Native process the communities term qasgiq (phonetic: kuz gik; "communal house"). We describe a theory of change framework built around the qasgiq model and explore ways this Indigenous intervention mobilizes aspects of traditional Yup'ik cultural logic to deliver strengths-based interventions for Yup'ik youth. This framework encompasses both an IK theory-driven intervention implementation schema and an IK approach to knowledge production. This intervention and its framework provide a set of recommendations to guide researchers and Indigenous communities who seek to create Indigenously informed and locally sustainable strategies for the promotion of health and well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
PubMed ID
30714766 View in PubMed
Less detail

Strengths-Based Assessment for Suicide Prevention: Reasons for Life as a Protective Factor From Yup'ik Alaska Native Youth Suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308931
Source
Assessment. 2019 Sep 20; :1073191119875789
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-20-2019
Author
James Allen
Stacy M Rasmus
Carlotta Ching Ting Fok
Billy Charles
Joseph Trimble
KyungSook Lee
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, MN, USA.
Source
Assessment. 2019 Sep 20; :1073191119875789
Date
Sep-20-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Suicide is the second leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native youth, and within the Alaska Native youth subpopulation, the leading cause of death. In response to this public health crisis, American Indian and Alaska Native communities have created strategies to protect their young people by building resilience using localized Indigenous well-being frameworks and cultural strengths. These approaches to suicide prevention emphasize promotion of protective factors over risk reduction. A measure of culturally based protective factors from suicide risk has potential to assess outcomes from these strengths-based, culturally grounded suicide prevention efforts, and can potentially address several substantive concerns regarding direct assessment of suicide risk. We report on the Reasons for Life (RFL) scale, a measure of protective factors from suicide, testing psychometric properties including internal structure with 302 rural Alaska Native Yup'ik youth. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed the RFL is best described through three distinct first-order factors organized under one higher second-order factor. Item response theory analyses identified 11 satisfactorily functioning items. The RFL correlates with other measures of more general protective factors. Implications of these findings are described, including generalizability to other American Indian and Alaska Native, other Indigenous, and other culturally distinct suicide disparities groups.
PubMed ID
31538813 View in PubMed
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Substance Use Research with Indigenous Communities: Exploring and Extending Foundational Principles of Community Psychology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302085
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2019 Sep; 64(1-2):146-158
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Dennis C Wendt
William E Hartmann
James Allen
Jacob A Burack
Billy Charles
Elizabeth J D'Amico
Colleen A Dell
Daniel L Dickerson
Dennis M Donovan
Joseph P Gone
Roisin M O'Connor
Sandra M Radin
Stacy M Rasmus
Kamilla L Venner
Melissa L Walls
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2019 Sep; 64(1-2):146-158
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Many Indigenous communities are concerned with substance use (SU) problems and eager to advance effective solutions for their prevention and treatment. Yet these communities also are concerned about the perpetuation of colonizing, disorder-focused, stigmatizing approaches to mental health, and social narratives related to SU problems. Foundational principles of community psychology-ecological perspectives, empowerment, sociocultural competence, community inclusion and partnership, and reflective practice-provide useful frameworks for informing ethical community-based research pertaining to SU problems conducted with and by Indigenous communities. These principles are explored and extended for Indigenous community contexts through themes generated from seven collaborative studies focused on understanding, preventing, and treating SU problems. These studies are generated from research teams working with Indigenous communities across the United States and Canada-inclusive of urban, rural, and reservation/reserve populations as well as adult and youth participants. Shared themes indicate that Indigenous SU research reflects community psychology principles, as an outgrowth of research agendas and processes that are increasingly guided by Indigenous communities. At the same time, this research challenges these principles in important ways pertaining to Indigenous-settler relations and Indigenous-specific considerations. We discuss these challenges and recommend greater synergy between community psychology and Indigenous research.
PubMed ID
31365138 View in PubMed
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With a Spirit that Understands: Reflections on a Long-term Community Science Initiative to End Suicide in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301990
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2019 Sep; 64(1-2):34-45
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2019
Author
Stacy M Rasmus
Billy Charles
Simeon John
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute for Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA.
Source
Am J Community Psychol. 2019 Sep; 64(1-2):34-45
Date
Sep-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
This retrospective analysis of a long-term community-based participatory research (CBPR) process spans over two decades of work with Alaska Native communities. A call to action from Alaska Native leadership to create more effective strategies to prevent and treat youth suicide and alcohol misuse risk initiated a response from university researchers. This CBPR process transformed into a collaborative effort to indigenously drive and develop solutions through research. The People Awakening project started our team on this translational and transformational pathway through community intervention science in the Central Yup'ik region of Alaska. We examine more deeply the major episodes and their successes and struggles in maintaining a long-term research relationship between university researchers and members of Yup'ik Alaska Native communities. We explore ways that our CBPR relationship has involved negotiation and engagement with power and praxis, to deepen and focus attention to knowledge systems and relational elements. This paper examines these deeper, transformative elements of our CBPR relationship that spans histories, cultures, and systems. Our discussion shares vignettes from academic and community perspectives to describe process in a unique collaboration, reaching to sometimes touch upon rare ground in emotions, tensions, and triumphs over the course of a dozen grants and twice as many years. We conclude by noting how there are points where, in a long-term CBPR relationship, transition out of emergence into coalescing and transformation can occur.
PubMed ID
31343758 View in PubMed
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