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Fruit and vegetable intake in a sample of 11-year-old children in 9 European countries: The Pro Children Cross-sectional Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29551
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):236-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Agneta Yngve
Alexandra Wolf
Eric Poortvliet
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Johannes Brug
Bettina Ehrenblad
Bela Franchini
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Rikke Krølner
Lea Maes
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Michael Sjostrom
Inga Thórsdóttir
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. agneta.yngve@prevnut.ki.se
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):236-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutrition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Sex Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: An adequate fruit and vegetable intake provides essential nutrients and nutritive compounds and is considered an important part of a healthy lifestyle. No simple instrument has been available for the assessment of fruit and vegetable intake as well as its determinants in school-aged children applicable in different European countries. Within the Pro Children Project, such an instrument has been developed. This paper describes the cross-sectional survey in 11-year-olds in 9 countries. METHODS: The cross-sectional survey used nationally, and in 2 countries regionally, representative samples of schools and classes. The questionnaires, including a precoded 24-hour recall component and a food frequency part, were completed in the classroom. Data were treated using common syntax files for portion sizes and for merging of vegetable types into four subgroups. RESULTS: The results show that the fruit and vegetable intake in amounts and choice were highly diverse in the 9 participating countries. Vegetable intake was in general lower than fruit intake, boys consumed less fruit and vegetables than girls did. The highest total intake according to the 24-hour recall was found in Austria and Portugal, the lowest in Spain and Iceland. CONCLUSION: The fruit and vegetable intake in 11-year-old children was in all countries far from reaching population goals and food-based dietary guidelines on national and international levels.
PubMed ID
16088087 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake of mothers of 11-year-old children in nine European countries: The Pro Children Cross-sectional Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29550
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alexandra Wolf
Agneta Yngve
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Eric Poortvliet
Bettina Ehrenblad
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Inga Thórsdóttir
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Johannes Brug
Lea Maes
Maria Daniel Vaz de Almeida
Rikke Krølner
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Recall
Mothers
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare fruit and vegetable intakes of mothers of 11-year-old children across Europe. METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in 9 European countries in October/November 2003. Self-administered questionnaires assessing fruit and vegetable consumption were used for data collection. The current paper presents dietary intake data obtained by a precoded 24-hour recall and a food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The consumption levels of fruit and vegetables (without fruit juice) were in line with World Health Organization recommendations of > or =400 g/day for only 27% of all participating mothers. Based on both instruments, the Pro Children results showed comparatively high average fruit intake levels in Portugal, Denmark and Sweden (211, 203 and 194 g/day) and the lowest intake in Iceland (97 g/day). High vegetable intake levels were found in Portugal and Belgium (169 and 150 g/day), the lowest in Spain (88 g/day). A south-north gradient could not be observed in the Pro Children study. CONCLUSION: Fruit and vegetable intakes are low in mothers of 11-year-olds across Europe. Especially vegetable consumption can be regarded as marginal in most of the studied European countries. A high percentage of mothers indicated to eat fruit and vegetables less than once a day. The results have shown that national and international interventions are necessary to promote fruit and especially vegetable consumption in the European population of mothers.
PubMed ID
16088088 View in PubMed
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Results From Sweden's 2016 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283678
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2016 Nov;13(11 Suppl 2):S284-S290
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
Christine Delisle Nyström
Christel Larsson
Bettina Ehrenblad
Hanna Eneroth
Ulf Eriksson
Marita Friberg
Maria Hagströmer
Anna Karin Lindroos
John J Reilly
Marie Löf
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2016 Nov;13(11 Suppl 2):S284-S290
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Environment Design
Exercise
Health promotion
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Research Report
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Abstract
The 2016 Swedish Report Card on Physical Activity (PA) for Children and Youth is a unique compilation of the existing physical and health related data in Sweden. The aim of this article is to summarize the procedure and results from the report card.
Nationally representative surveys and individual studies published between 2005-2015 were included. Eleven PA and health indicators were graded using the Active Healthy Kids Canada grading system. Grades were assigned based on the percentage of children/youth meeting a defined benchmark (A: 81% to 100%, B: 61% to 80%, C: 41% to 60%, D: 21% to 40%, F: 0% to 20%, or incomplete (INC).
The assigned grades were Overall Physical Activity, D; Organized Sport Participation, B+; Active Play, INC; Active Transportation, C+; Sedentary Behaviors, C; Family and Peers, INC; School, C+; Community and the Built Environment, B; Government Strategies and Investments, B; Diet, C-; and Obesity, D.
The included data provides some support that overall PA is too low and sedentary behavior is too high for almost all age groups in Sweden, even with the many national policies as well as an environment that is favorable to the promotion of PA.
PubMed ID
27848718 View in PubMed
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