Skip header and navigation
Did you mean name:"berterö Carina"? Also try berterö, or bertaro.

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Foreign-born and Swedish-born families' perceptions of psychosis care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90548
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(1):62-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Hultsjö Sally
Berterö Carina
Hjelm Katarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden. sallyhultsjo@hotmail.com
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2009 Feb;18(1):62-71
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Communication Barriers
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cultural Competency
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Europe - ethnology
Family - ethnology - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Middle East - ethnology
Nursing Methodology Research
Prejudice
Professional-Family Relations
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Sweden
Vietnam - ethnology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe how foreign-born and Swedish born families living in Sweden perceive psychosis care. Eleven foreign-born and 15 Swedish-born family members were interviewed and the data were analyzed using a phenomenographic approach. The findings showed three main descriptive categories: taking responsibility, access to care, and attitudes to psychosis. The degree of responsibility in the family decreased if there was easy access to care and support from health-care staff. Knowledge of psychosis was considered to be important in order to counteract prejudiced attitudes in the family and the community. Foreign-born families did not want to be treated differently from Swedes and stressed the importance of finding ways to communicate despite communication barriers. Foreign-born families also were affected by their experiences of psychiatric care and different beliefs about psychosis in their home country. The results indicate how important it is that health-care staff members treat families on equal terms. It is necessary to take the time to identify how to communicate in a good manner and to identify families' previous experiences of and beliefs about psychosis care in order to help families face prejudice in society and to see beyond the psychosis.
PubMed ID
19125788 View in PubMed
Less detail

Having knowledge of metabolic syndrome: does the meaning and consequences of the risk factors influence the life situation of Swedish adults?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90538
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2008 Dec;10(4):300-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Frisman Gunilla Hollman
Berterö Carina
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. gunho@imv.liu.se
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2008 Dec;10(4):300-5
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - nursing
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The underlying causes of metabolic syndrome (MS) are uncertain. Knowledge from those who have experience of this syndrome should provide new insight. The aim was to explore the meaning and consequences of MS. Thirteen Swedish adults with MS, aged between 33 and 82 years, were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed using constant comparative analysis, which is the basis of grounded theory. The core category for the meaning and consequences of having the risk factors of MS consisted of the recurrence of behavior. The participants attempted to balance their insight into the causes and consequences by referring to their normal life, lifestyle, and fatalistic approach to life. Attention needs to be paid to the attitudes of the individuals with MS, as well as the known risk factors and their consequences, in order to facilitate a long-term lifestyle change in these individuals.
PubMed ID
19128306 View in PubMed
Less detail

Longitudinal study of patients after myocardial infarction: sense of coherence, quality of life, and symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89800
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Mar-Apr;38(2):129-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bergman Eva
Malm Dan
Karlsson Jan-Erik
Berterö Carina
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Heart Lung. 2009 Mar-Apr;38(2):129-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Myocardial infarction has pronounced effects on an individual that demand changes in lifestyle. Health is influenced by whether the individual experiences the world as comprehensible, meaningful, and manageable, that is, has a sense of coherence (SOC). High SOC scores indicate that the individual probably manages the situation by understanding the context and connections: action and effect. OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to identify the SOC, assess the quality of life (Short Form-12 Health Survey Questionnaire), assess the symptoms using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire, and create health curves from a baseline for patients with a first myocardial infarction. METHODS: A longitudinal and predictive study of 100 participants in the heart care unit of a county hospital in southern Sweden was performed. RESULTS: Women score lower on SOC than men. Persons with high SOC scores have fewer angina attacks, are more physically active, drink more alcohol, are more satisfied with their treatments, and have better disease perception. CONCLUSION: By following SOC scores, a trend emerges that suggests it may be a useful tool for identifying those who will need extra support.
PubMed ID
19254631 View in PubMed
Less detail

Men's experience of their life situation when diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95211
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2009 Sep;13(4):268-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Jonsson Annikki
Aus Gunnar
Berterö Carina
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Care, Höglandssjukhuset, Nässjö, Sweden. annikki.jonsson@telia.com
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2009 Sep;13(4):268-73
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Awareness
Emotions
Erectile Dysfunction - etiology
Fatigue - etiology
Grief
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Nursing Methodology Research
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - pathology - psychology
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIM: The aim was to improve the knowledge and understanding of how newly diagnosed advanced prostate cancer affects the men and their life situation and perhaps causes fatigue before the side effects of any treatment has an impact on them. METHOD: The qualitative study where ten men, newly diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer and at an early stage in their treatment, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed by using Gadamer's hermeneutics. RESULTS: The men in the present study did not experience fatigue specifically because they had been diagnosed for advanced prostate cancer. Three topics were identified during the analysis and interpretations: awareness of mortality, the influence on their emotions and the influence on their normal life. These topics offered a structure presenting the essence; the need to get back to as normal a life as possible, albeit with a new perspective. The topics together confirmed an affected life situation, which in turn helped the participants to form a new perspective on life. CONCLUSION: The knowledge and understanding of the study is that advanced prostate cancer affects men's lives: they are placed in a new life situation, against their will, and in their new situation they form a new life perspective. Healthcare professionals need to evaluate, perceive and furthermore understand the men's apprehensions and expectations, on an individual basis, for their future and empower them to formulate a new life perspective.
PubMed ID
19535293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nullified: Women's perceptions of being abused in health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77391
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2007 Sep;28(3):161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Swahnberg Katarina
Thapar-Björkert Suruchi
Berterö Carina
Author Affiliation
Division of Gender and Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University. Sweden.
Source
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2007 Sep;28(3):161-7
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective. In a study performed with The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ) among Nordic gynecological patients, the prevalence of lifetime abuse in health care (AHC) was 13 - 28%. In the present study we chose a qualitative approach. Our aim was to develop a more in-depth understanding of AHC; as experienced by female Swedish patients. Study design. Qualitative interviews with 10 Swedish gynecological patients who had experienced AHC. The interviews were analyzed through Grounded Theory. Results. Saturation was reached after six interviews. In the analyses four categories emerged which explain what AHC meant to the participating women: felt powerless, felt ignored, experienced carelessness, and experienced non-empathy. To be nullified is the core category that theoretically binds the four categories together. The women's narratives described intensive current suffering even though the abusive event had taken place several years ago. Conclusions. The fact that AHC exists is a critical dilemma for an institution that has the society's commission to cure and/or to alleviate pain and suffering. In their narratives, women described the experience of 'being nullified', a core category that embodies AHC.
PubMed ID
17577759 View in PubMed
Less detail

Perceptions of psychiatric care among foreign- and Swedish-born people with psychotic disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87639
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2007 Nov;60(3):279-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Hultsjö Sally
Berterö Carina
Hjelm Katarina
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden. sallyhultsjo@hotmail.com
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2007 Nov;60(3):279-88
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Perception
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - nursing - psychology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
AIM: This paper is a report of a study to explore different perceptions of psychiatric care among foreign- and Swedish-born people with psychotic disorders. BACKGROUND: Research from different countries reports a high-incidence of psychosis among migrants. The risk-factors discussed are social disadvantages in the new country. To understand and meet the needs of people from different countries, their perspective of psychiatric care must be illuminated and taken into consideration. METHOD: A phenomenographic study was conducted in 2005-2006 using semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 12 foreign-born people and 10 Swedish-born people with psychosis. FINDINGS: Three categories were identified: personal and family involvement in care; relating to healthcare staff; and managing illness and everyday life. Foreign-born people differed from Swedish-born people in that they struggled to attain an everyday life in Sweden, relied on healthcare staff as experts in making decisions, and had religious beliefs about mental illness. Among Swedish-born people, the need for more support to relatives and help to perform recreational activities was important. CONCLUSION: It is important to identify individual perceptions and needs, which may be influenced by cultural origins, when caring for patients with psychosis. Previous experience of care, different ways of relating to staff, and individual needs should be identified and met with respect. Social needs should not be medicalized but taken into consideration when planning care, which illustrates the importance of multi-professional co-operation.
PubMed ID
17822426 View in PubMed
Less detail

Performing the first pelvic examination: female medical students' transition to examiners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87641
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Dec;69(1-3):55-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Siwe Karin
Wijma Barbro
Silén Charlotte
Berterö Carina
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden. karin.siwe@lio.se
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Dec;69(1-3):55-62
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Communication
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - methods
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Gynecology - education
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Palpation
Patient Simulation
Physical Examination
Physician-Patient Relations
Psychology, Educational
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
Taboo
Vagina
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To gain a deeper understanding of how female medical students perceive and experience performing their first pelvic examination (PE). METHODS: A qualitative study. In-depth interviews after the students' involvement in a learning session about the PE, with professional patients (PPs) as instructors and a gynaecologist as supervisor. The interviews were analysed according to the constant comparative method to acquire a deeper understanding of the students' experiences and the ongoing social processes. RESULTS: "Transcending unspoken boundaries and taboos, a prerequisite for learning" was the essence of the entire material and was identified from two categories: "A didactic design facilitates the transition to examiner" and "Interactive support enables creative learning of interpersonal and palpation skills". CONCLUSION: Through interactive guidance from the PPs, the students overcame affective obstacles and achieved the aim of becoming an examiner. The favourable learning experience heightened their awareness of their own bodies and promoted a deeper interest in PEs, both as examiners and as patients. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Engaging voluntary, healthy and knowledgeable women as instructors in the PE situation creates a safe learning environment and promotes interaction with students. Immediate feedback teaches students to integrate communicative and behavioural skills in a professional manner and to palpate the uterus.
PubMed ID
17714908 View in PubMed
Less detail

Receiving a diagnosis of inoperable lung cancer: patients' perspectives of how it affects their life situation and quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94016
Source
Acta Oncol. 2008;47(5):862-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Berterö Carina
Vanhanen Maria
Appelin Gunilla
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkping University, Linköping, Sweden. carbe@imv.liu.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 2008;47(5):862-9
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Emotions
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Palliative Care
Psychometrics
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Lung cancer is a disease with many biomedical and psychological symptoms. The diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer induces adverse effects. Having an inoperable lung cancer there are few possibilities of being cured. Management of patients with inoperable disease is directed at relieving local or systemic symptoms. The purpose of this study is to describe how it affects the patients' life situation and quality of life. Data was collected by qualitative interviews where the patient's lived experiences were articulated. Twenty-three Swedish patients diagnosed and starting palliative treatment for inoperable lung cancer were interviewed. The interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were interpreted trough interpretive phenomenology. Six themes were identified that were important for the informants' experience of their life situation and quality of life. The themes were: Experience of uncertainty; including time of waiting and thoughts, experience of hope; about a prolonged life, network as support; being treated as the person they are thoughts of death; is there time to conclude their lives?, feelings of shame and guilt; they have caused the disease by themselves and next of kin reactions; sadness, guilt, worries and anger. These six themes gave a structure presenting the essence: Living as usual. Maintaining independency and integrity were important, as well as maintaining status, being treated as the person they always had been and that they experience that they had a meaning to fulfill in life. They were living as usual. The findings of this study point out the importance of improving the care of people afflicted with lung cancer, as well as promoting support for the next of kin, since they are significantly important for these patients' experiences of quality of life. This knowledge and understanding will be useful for development of interventions and guidelines for treatment.
PubMed ID
17891669 View in PubMed
Less detail

The significance of social support and social networks among newly diagnosed lung cancer patients in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92070
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2008 Sep;10(3):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Sjölander Catarina
Berterö Carina
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. catarina.sjolander@lj.se
Source
Nurs Health Sci. 2008 Sep;10(3):182-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Social Support
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The purposes of this study were to identify and describe the impact that social support and a social network has for adult people recently diagnosed with lung cancer in Sweden. Ten lung cancer patients participated. The data were collected using qualitative interviews based on an interview guide and were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. This led to a core category, "receiving confirmation as a person", which was grounded via four categories: "good relationships within a social network", "conversation enables support", "confidence in the situation", and "to manage by oneself". These categories were all related to each other. How these categories might have a positive influence on a person and give them the strength to move on were also clarified. The social network identified comprised of a few people who were close to the patient. The knowledge gained from this study can be used when developing care guidelines at different levels for use by health-care professionals.
PubMed ID
18786059 View in PubMed
Less detail

Why do young women continue to have sexual intercourse despite pain?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91922
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2008 Oct;43(4):357-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Elmerstig Eva
Wijma Barbro
Berterö Carina
Author Affiliation
Division of Gender and Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden. evael@imk.liu.se
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2008 Oct;43(4):357-63
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Coitus - psychology
Dyspareunia - psychology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Self Concept
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
PURPOSE: Many young women suffer from pain and discomfort during sexual intercourse, and an increasing number of them seek help for their problems. It seems that some young women continue to have sexual intercourse despite pain. However, their motives are unclear. METHODS: A total of 16 women, aged 14 to 20 years, with variable degrees of coital pain were selected at a youth center in a city in southeastern Sweden, to explore why they continued to have sexual intercourse despite pain. The women participated in audiotaped qualitative individual interviews, which were analyzed using the constant comparative method from grounded theory. RESULTS: During the analysis we identified the core category striving to be affirmed in their image of an ideal woman and the categories resignation, sacrifice, and feeling guilt. The perceived ideal women had several distinct characteristics, such as willingness to have sexual intercourse, being perceptive of their partner's sexual needs, and being able to satisfy their partners. Having sexual intercourse per se was considered to be an affirmation of being a normal woman, irrespective of pain or discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: These young women's focus on a constructed ideal explains why they continue to have sexual intercourse despite pain. Greater awareness of these beliefs among gynecologists, sexologists, and other healthcare professionals involved in the management of young women with coital pain would be beneficial.
PubMed ID
18809133 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.