Skip header and navigation

Refine By

26 records – page 1 of 3.

Body mass index and cancer: results from the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16857
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 15;118(2):458-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2006
Author
Annekatrin Lukanova
Ove Björ
Rudolf Kaaks
Per Lenner
Bernt Lindahl
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jan 15;118(2):458-66
Date
Jan-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Excess weight has been associated with increased risk of cancer. The effect of body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) on overall cancer risk and on risk of developing several common cancer types was examined in a population-based cohort study. Height and weight measurements were available for 35,362 women and 33,424 men recruited in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Cohort between 1985 and 2003. Among cohort members, 2,691 incident cancer cases were identified. The association of BMI with cancer risk was examined using Poisson regression. Women with BMI > 27.1 (top quartile) had a 29% higher risk of developing any malignancy compared to women with BMI of 18.5-22.2 (lowest quartile), which increased to 47% in analysis limited to nonsmokers. Analyses according to WHO cut-off points showed that obese women (BMI > or = 30) had a 36% higher risk of cancer than women with BMI in the normal range (18.5-25). Individual cancer sites most strongly related to obesity were endometrium (risk for top quartile = 3.53, 95% confidence interval 1.86-7.43), ovary (2.09, 1.13-4.13) and colon (2.05, 1.04-4.41). BMI was inversely related to breast cancer occurring before age 49 (0.58, 0.29-1.11, p(trend) or = 30), however, were at increased risk of developing kidney cancer (3.63, 1.23-10.7) and, after exclusion of cases diagnosed within 1 year of recruitment, colon cancer (1.77, 1.04-2.95). Our study provides further evidence that BMI is positively associated with cancer risk. In women from northern Sweden, up to 7% of all cancers were attributable to overweight and obesity and could be avoided by keeping BMI within the recommended range.
PubMed ID
16049963 View in PubMed
Less detail

Burnout, working conditions and gender--results from the northern Sweden MONICA Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96722
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:326
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sofia Norlund
Christina Reuterwall
Jonas Höög
Bernt Lindahl
Urban Janlert
Lisbeth Slunga Birgander
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:326
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sick-leave because of mental and behavioural disorders has increased considerably in Sweden since the late nineties, and especially in women. The aim of this study was to assess the level of burnout in the general working population in northern Sweden and analyse it's relation to working conditions and gender. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study the survey from the MONICA-study (Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease) in northern Sweden 2004 was used. A burnout instrument, the Shirom Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ), was incorporated in the original survey which was sent to a random sample of 2500 individuals with a response rate of 76%. After including only actively working people, aged 25-64 years, our study population consisted of 1000 participants (497 women and 503 men). ANOVA and multiple linear regression models were used. RESULTS: The prevalence of a high level of burnout (SMBQ >4.0) was 13%. Women had a higher level of burnout than men with the most pronounced difference in the age group 35-44 years. In both sexes the level of burnout decreased with age. Demand and control at work, and job insecurity were related to burnout. In women the level of education, socioeconomic position, work object, and working varying hours were of importance. Interaction effects were found between sex and work object, and sex and working hours. In a multiple regression analysis almost half of the gender difference could be explained by work related and life situational factors. CONCLUSIONS: Working life conditions contributed to the level of burnout in this actively working sample from the general population in northern Sweden. Especially in women, socioeconomic position was associated with burnout. The high level of burnout in women compared to men was partly explained by more unfavourable working conditions and life situational factors. Efforts to level out gender differences in burnout should probably focus on improving both working and socioeconomic conditions for women.
PubMed ID
20534136 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study Cohort - evaluation of risk factors and their interactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47322
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Göran Hallmans
Asa Agren
Gerd Johansson
Anders Johansson
Birgitta Stegmayr
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Bernt Lindahl
Olle Rolandsson
Stefan Söderberg
Mats Nilsson
Ingegerd Johansson
Lars Weinehall
Author Affiliation
Nutritional Research, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. goran.hallmans@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:18-24
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Humans
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is, first, to describe the organization, sampling procedures, availability of samples/database, ethical considerations, and quality control program of the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study Cohort. Secondly, some examples are given of studies on cardiovascular disease and diabetes with a focus on the biomarker programme. The cohort has been positioned as a national and international resource for scientific research.
PubMed ID
14660243 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee consumption and risk of rare cancers in Scandinavian countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297621
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 03; 33(3):287-302
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Marko Lukic
Lena Maria Nilsson
Guri Skeie
Bernt Lindahl
Tonje Braaten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway. marko.lukic@uit.no.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 03; 33(3):287-302
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Coffee - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies on the association between heavy coffee consumption and risk of less frequently diagnosed cancers are scarce. We aimed to quantify the association between filtered, boiled, and total coffee consumption and the risk of bladder, esophageal, kidney, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. We used data from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Information on coffee consumption was available for 193,439 participants. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the investigated cancer sites by category of total, filtered, and boiled coffee consumption. Heavy filtered coffee consumers (= 4 cups/day) had a multivariable adjusted HR of 0.74 of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (95% CI 0.57-0.95) when compared with light filtered coffee consumers (= 1 cup/day). We did not observe significant associations between total or boiled coffee consumption and any of the investigated cancer sites, neither in the entire study sample nor in analyses stratified by sex. We found an increased risk of bladder cancer among never smokers who were heavy filtered or total coffee consumers, and an increased risk of stomach cancer in never smokers who were heavy boiled coffee consumers. Our data suggest that increased filtered coffee consumption might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find evidence of an association between coffee consumption and the risk of esophageal or kidney cancer. The increased risk of bladder and stomach cancer was confined to never smokers.
PubMed ID
29476356 View in PubMed
Less detail

Components of metabolic syndrome predicting diabetes: no role of inflammation or dyslipidemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162424
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1875-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Margareta Norberg
Hans Stenlund
Bernt Lindahl
Christer Andersson
Lars Weinehall
Gãran Hallmans
Jan W Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences Section, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University Hospital, Building 9B, SE-901 85 Umea, Sweden. margareta.norberg@epiph.umu.se
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Jul;15(7):1875-85
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Dyslipidemias - physiopathology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammation - physiopathology
Leptin - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Proinsulin - blood
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The diagnostic criteria and the clinical usefulness of the metabolic syndrome (MetSy) are currently questioned. The objective was to describe the structure of MetSy and to evaluate its components for prediction of diabetes type 2 (T2DM).
This was a case-referent study nested within a population-based health survey. Among 33,336 participants, we identified 177 initially non-diabetic individuals who developed T2DM after 0.1 to 10.5 years (mean, 5.4 years), and, for each diabetes case, two referents matched for sex, age, and year of health survey. Baseline variables included oral glucose tolerance test, BMI, blood pressure, blood lipids, adipokines, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance, and beta-cell function. Exploratory and confirmative factor analyses were applied to hypothesize the structure of the MetSy. The prediction of T2DM by the different factors was evaluated by multivariate logistic regression analysis.
A hypothetical five-factor model of intercorrelated composite factors was generated. The inflammation, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure factors were predicitive only in univariate analysis. In multivariable analyses, two factors independently and significantly predicted T2DM: an obesity/insulin resistance factor and a glycemia factor. The composite factors did not improve the prediction of T2DM compared with single variables. Among the original variables, fasting glucose, proinsulin, BMI, and blood pressure values were predictive of T2DM.
Our data support the concept of a MetSy, and we propose five separate clusters of components. The inflammation and dyslipidemia factors were not independently associated with diabetes risk. In contrast, obesity and accompanying insulin resistance and beta-cell decompensation seem to be two core perturbations promoting and predicting progression to T2DM.
PubMed ID
17636107 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumption of filtered and boiled coffee and the risk of incident cancer: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143206
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1533-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Lenner
Bernt Lindahl
Bethany Van Guelpen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1533-44
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Cooking
Drinking
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite potentially relevant chemical differences between filtered and boiled coffee, this study is the first to investigate consumption in relation to the risk of incident cancer.
Subjects were from the Västerbotten Intervention Project (64,603 participants, including 3,034 cases), with up to 15 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated by multivariate Cox regression.
No associations were found for all cancer sites combined, or for prostate or colorectal cancer. For breast cancer, boiled coffee =4 versus
PubMed ID
20512657 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diabetes and obesity in Northern Sweden: occurrence and risk factors for stroke and myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47321
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:70-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Mats Eliasson
Bernt Lindahl
Vivan Lundberg
Birgitta Stegmayr
Author Affiliation
Medicine, Department of Medicine, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå, Sweden. mats.eliasson@nll.se
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:70-7
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cerebrovascular Accident - complications - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - epidemiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: The authors describe the occurrence of diabetes and obesity in the population of Northern Sweden and the role of diabetes in cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Four surveys of the population aged 25 to 64 years were undertaken during a 14-year time span. Stroke events in subjects 35-74 years during 1985-92 and myocardial infarction in subjects 25-64 years 1989-93 were registered. RESULTS: The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was 3.1 and 2.0% in men and women, respectively, and 2.6 and 2.7% for previously undiagnosed diabetes. During the 13-year observation period, BMI increased 0.96 kg/m(2) in men and 0.87 in women. The proportion of subjects with obesity (BMI>or=30) increased from 10.3% to 14.6% in men and from 12.5% to 15.7% in women. Hip circumference increased substantially more than waist circumference, leading to a decreasing waits-to-hip ratio (WHR). The relative risk for stroke or myocardial infarction was four to six times higher in a person with diabetes than in those without diabetes. The 28-day case fatality for myocardial infarction, but not for stroke, was significantly higher in both men and women with diabetes. Population-attributable risk for diabetes and stroke was 18% in men and 22% in women and for myocardial infarction it was 11% in men and 17% in women. CONCLUSION: Obesity is becoming more common, although of a more distal than central distribution. The burden of diabetes in cardiovascular diseases in Northern Sweden is high.
PubMed ID
14660250 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary inflammatory index and risk of first myocardial infarction; a prospective population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286526
Source
Nutr J. 2017 Apr 04;16(1):21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-04-2017
Author
Stina Bodén
Maria Wennberg
Bethany Van Guelpen
Ingegerd Johansson
Bernt Lindahl
Jonas Andersson
Nitin Shivappa
James R Hebert
Lena Maria Nilsson
Source
Nutr J. 2017 Apr 04;16(1):21
Date
Apr-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Exercise
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Interleukin-6 - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Chronic, low-grade inflammation is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The inflammatory impact of diet can be reflected by concentrations of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream and the inflammatory potential of diet can be estimated by the dietary inflammatory index (DII(TM)), which has been associated with cardiovascular disease risk in some previous studies. We aimed to examine the association between the DII and the risk of first myocardial infarction (MI) in a population-based study with long follow-up.
We conducted a prospective case-control study of 1389 verified cases of first MI and 5555 matched controls nested within the population-based cohorts of the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS), of which the largest is the ongoing Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) with nearly 100 000 participants during the study period. Median follow-up from recruitment to MI diagnosis was 6.4 years (6.2 for men and 7.2 for women). DII scores were derived from a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) administered in 1986-2006. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using quartile 1 (most anti-inflammatory diet) as the reference category. For validation, general linear models were used to estimate the association between the DII scores and two inflammatory markers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in a subset (n?=?605) of the study population.
Male participants with the most pro-inflammatory DII scores had an increased risk of MI [ORQ4vsQ1?=?1.57 (95% CI 1.21-2.02) P trend?=?0.02], which was essentially unchanged after adjustment for potential confounders, including cardiovascular risk factors [ORQ4vsQ1?=?1.50 (95% CI 1.14-1.99), P trend?=?0.10]. No association was found between DII and MI in women. An increase of one DII score unit was associated with 9% higher hsCRP (95% CI 0.03-0.14) and 6% higher IL-6 (95% CI 0.02-0.11) in 605 controls with biomarker data available.
A pro-inflammatory diet was associated with an elevated risk of first myocardial infarction in men; whereas for women the relationship was null. Consideration of the inflammatory impact of diet could improve prevention of cardiovascular disease.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Apr;24(2):389-987635601
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Sep;16(3):171-69800231
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;25(6):398-40525900255
Cites: Prev Med. 2012 May;54 Suppl:S29-3722178471
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:18-2414660243
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Aug;17 (8):1825-3324107546
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Jul;65(7):800-721468094
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2016 Jan;23 (2):194-20525416041
Cites: Nutr J. 2012 Jun 11;11:4022686621
Cites: J Intern Med. 2011 Oct;270(4):365-7621443679
Cites: Adv Nutr. 2015 Nov 13;6(6):738-4726567198
Cites: J Clin Chem Clin Biochem. 1984 Dec;22(12):895-9046396369
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2002 Jun;5(3):487-9612003662
Cites: Glob Health Action. 2010 Mar 22;3:null20339479
Cites: Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2003;61:9-1714660242
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Sep 5;374(9692):767-919733769
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2011 Dec;106 Suppl 3:S5-7822133051
Cites: J Nutr. 2015 Mar;145(3):532-4025733469
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2014 Aug;17 (8):1689-9623941862
Cites: Epidemiology. 1992 Sep;3(5):452-61391139
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6):1369-7916762949
Cites: PLoS Med. 2008 Apr 8;5(4):e7818399716
Cites: Obes Rev. 2010 Feb;11(2):137-4919656309
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2017 Mar;56(2):683-69226644215
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2012 Oct 28;108(8):1428-3422221517
Cites: Nutrients. 2015 May 29;7(6):4124-3826035241
Cites: Nutr J. 2014 Nov 22;13:10725416917
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2002 Nov;12 (8):577-8612495831
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Jan 28;107(3):499-51112551878
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;11(6):417-2711454501
Cites: Nutr Res. 2014 Dec;34(12):1058-6525190219
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Sep 04;10 (9):e013522126340022
Cites: Nutr Res. 2016 May;36(5):391-40127101757
Cites: Circulation. 1994 Jul;90(1):583-6128026046
Cites: J Nutr. 2007 Apr;137(4):992-817374666
Cites: Nature. 2002 Dec 19-26;420(6917):868-7412490960
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Sep;12(9):1477-8419144238
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2003 Dec 1;92(11):1335-914636916
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2016 Oct;253:164-17027498398
Cites: Cent Eur J Immunol. 2015;40(3):380-626648785
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Aug;64(8):905-1320502473
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1997 Dec 15;146(12):1046-559420529
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Mar;103(3):878-8526864363
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Dec;13(6):924-3017143124
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2003 Jul 3;92(1A):10i-8i12867250
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2001 Aug;4(4):919-2711527517
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2015 Dec 28;114(12):2074-8226450630
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2015 Jan;238(1):38-4425437888
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Dec 18;5(12):e00965126685034
PubMed ID
28376792 View in PubMed
Less detail

Estimated intake of milk fat is negatively associated with cardiovascular risk factors and does not increase the risk of a first acute myocardial infarction. A prospective case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53379
Source
Br J Nutr. 2004 Apr;91(4):635-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Eva Warensjö
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Lars Berglund
Kurt Boman
Bo Ahrén
Lars Weinehall
Bernt Lindahl
Göran Hallmans
Bengt Vessby
Author Affiliation
Unit for Clinical Nutrition Research, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2004 Apr;91(4):635-42
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - chemistry
Myocardial Infarction - blood - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Milk fat is high in saturated fatty acids (SFA) and high intakes of SFA are associated with cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the potential risk of a first-ever acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in relation to the estimated milk-fat intake, reflected as the proportions of pentadecanoic acid (15 : 0) and heptadecanoic acid (17 : 0) in serum lipid esters. This was evaluated in a study population selected within the Västerbotten Intervention Program and the northern Sweden 'Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular disease' survey populations. A prospective case-control design was used. The proportions of the biomarkers were lower in the cases (n 78) than in the controls (n 156), who were matched for age, sex, sampling time and geographical region. The standardised odds ratios of becoming an AMI case were between 0.7 and 0.8 for the biomarkers. The proportions of 15 : 0 and 17 : 0 in serum phospholipids were significantly and negatively correlated to serum concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tissue-type plasminogen activator, triacylglycerols, insulin, specific insulin, pro-insulin and leptin (all P
PubMed ID
15035691 View in PubMed
Less detail

Experiences of barriers and facilitators to weight-loss in a diet intervention - a qualitative study of women in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104492
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2014;14:59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne Hammarström
Anncristine Fjellman Wiklund
Bernt Lindahl
Christel Larsson
Christina Ahlgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. anne.hammarstrom@umu.se.
Source
BMC Womens Health. 2014;14:59
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - diet therapy - psychology
Overweight - diet therapy - psychology
Patient Dropouts - psychology
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
There is a lack of research about the experiences of participating in weight-reducing interventions. The aim of this study was to explore barriers and facilitators to weight-loss experienced by participants in a diet intervention for middle-aged to older women in the general population in Northern Sweden.
In the intervention the women were randomised to eat either a Palaeolithic-type diet or a diet according to Nordic Nutrition recommendations for 24 months. A strategic selection was made of women from the two intervention groups as well as from the drop-outs in relation to social class, civil status and age. Thematic structured interviews were performed with twelve women and analysed with qualitative content analyses.
The results showed that the women in the dietary intervention experienced two main barriers - struggling with self (related to difficulties in changing food habits, health problems, lack of self-control and insecurity) and struggling with implementing the diet (related to social relations and project-related difficulties) - and two main facilitators- striving for self-determination (related to having clear goals) and receiving support (from family/friends as well as from the project) - for weight-loss. There was a greater emphasis on barriers than on facilitators.
It is important to also include drop-outs from diet interventions in order to fully understand barriers to weight-loss. A gender-relational approach can bring new insights into understanding experiences of barriers to weight-loss.
ClinicalTrials gov NCT00692536.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2011 May;72(9):1499-50621497972
Cites: Nurs Health Sci. 2012 Mar;14(1):18-2422292969
Cites: Health Expect. 2013 Jun;16(2):119-4221645186
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2014 Mar;68(3):350-724473459
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 1999 Dec;27(4):260-610724468
Cites: J Am Coll Health. 2000 May;48(6):247-5610863868
Cites: Appetite. 2001 Aug;37(1):47-5611562157
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Nov;74(5):579-8411684524
Cites: Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Feb;24(2):105-1214769454
Cites: Adv Ther. 2004 Mar-Apr;21(2):61-7515310080
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Oct 1;366(9492):1197-20916198769
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2005 Sep;37(5):273-8016208859
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Apr;22(4):518-2217372803
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007 Apr;61(4):526-3116988645
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2008;32(1):20-3917617461
Cites: J Hum Nutr Diet. 2008 Feb;21(1):72-8018184396
Cites: Diabetes Educ. 2008 Mar-Apr;34(2):277-8418375777
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2008 Apr;108(4):640-718375220
Cites: Nutr J. 2008;7:3419025661
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2009 Jul-Aug;41(4):281-619508934
Cites: Br J Community Nurs. 2009 Nov;14(11):495-50120166475
Cites: Health Soc Care Community. 2010 Mar;18(2):219-2820059569
Cites: Clin Nutr. 2010 Jun;29(3):288-30320056521
PubMed ID
24739099 View in PubMed
Less detail

26 records – page 1 of 3.