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27 records – page 1 of 3.

Contact allergy to oxidized geraniol among Swedish dermatitis patients-A multicentre study by the Swedish Contact Dermatitis Research Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299901
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2018 Oct; 79(4):232-238
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Lina Hagvall
Magnus Bruze
Malin Engfeldt
Marléne Isaksson
Magnus Lindberg
Kristina Ryberg
Berndt Stenberg
Cecilia Svedman
Ann-Therese Karlberg
Johanna Bråred Christensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2018 Oct; 79(4):232-238
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Monoterpenes - adverse effects
Oxides - adverse effects
Patch Tests
Perfume - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Terpenes - adverse effects
Abstract
Geraniol is a widely used fragrance terpene, and is included in fragrance mix I. Geraniol is prone to autoxidation, forming the skin sensitizers geranial, neral, and geraniol-7-hydroperoxide. Oxidized geraniol has previously been patch tested in 1 clinic, giving 1% to 4.6% positive reactions in consecutive patients when tested at 2% to 11%.
To compare test reactions to pure and oxidized geraniol, to compare 2 different test concentrations of oxidized geraniol and to investigate the pattern of concomitant reactions to fragrance markers of the baseline series in a multicentre setting.
One thousand four hundred and seventy-six consecutive patients referred for patch testing were patch tested with geraniol 6% pet. and oxidized geraniol 6% and 11% pet.
Pure geraniol 6% pet., oxidized geraniol 6% pet. and oxidized geraniol 11% pet. gave 1%, 3% and 8% positive patch test reactions and 0.7%, 3% and 5% doubtful reactions, respectively. Approximately 50% of the patients with doubtful reactions to oxidized geraniol 6% pet. had positive reactions to oxidized geraniol 11% pet.
Oxidized geraniol 11% pet. provides better detection than oxidized geraniol 6% pet. As most patients reacted only to oxidized geraniol, it is important to explore further whether oxidized geraniol should be included in a baseline patch test series.
PubMed ID
29926925 View in PubMed
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Contact allergy trends in Sweden - a retrospective comparison of patch test data from 1992, 2000, and 2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269448
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2015 May;72(5):297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Sofia Fall
Magnus Bruze
Marléne Isaksson
Carola Lidén
Mihaly Matura
Berndt Stenberg
Magnus Lindberg
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2015 May;72(5):297-304
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Allergens - adverse effects
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Patch Tests - trends
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Contact allergy prevalence rates change over time as a result of variations in allergen exposure. Data from patch test clinics are often used as markers for allergy trends.
The aim of the present retrospective study was to describe trends in rates of sensitization to allergens in the Swedish baseline series.
Prevalence rates are described by comparing consecutive patch test data from 1992, 2000 and 2009 in Swedish patch test clinics. In total, 3680 patients were included in 1992, 3825 in 2000, and 3112 in 2009.
Among test substances with a sensitization rate above 2% in 2009, significant decreases were noted for nickel sulfate, cobalt chloride, colophonium, and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI)/methylisothiazolinone (MI), and a significant increase for p-phenylenediamine, as compared with 1992. Potassium dichromate reactions had increased among younger women, whereas reactions to nickel and cobalt had decreased in this group. Sensitization to chromium, cobalt and fragrance mix I had decreased among older men, and sensitization to nickel had decreased among younger men.
It is probable that these changes in 1992-2009 reflect both changes in regulations for nickel, lower levels of chromium in cement and of MCI/MI in cosmetics, and increasing use of hair dyes.
PubMed ID
25600880 View in PubMed
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Determinants of quality of life in a psoriasis population in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30432
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2004;84(1):37-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Margaretha Uttjek
Mona Dufåker
Lennart Nygren
Berndt Stenberg
Author Affiliation
Section of Dermatology and Venereology, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. margaretha.uttjek@dermven.umu.se
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2004;84(1):37-43
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Psoriasis - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess possible determinants of quality of life in psoriasis patients in northern Sweden, and to analyse the association between these determinants and quality of life. A questionnaire was mailed to 1,707 subjects, resulting in a response rate of 74%. The study is therefore based on 1,060 subjects, since 195 denied having psoriasis. Quality of life was measured using a version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index. The extent of the disease was estimated using the patients' sketches. The association between determinants and quality of life was calculated in a risk analysis using logistic regression. Large disease extent and joint symptoms were the strongest indicators for impaired quality of life. Other indicators were withdrawal from medical treatment due to distance to treatment facilities, which strongly influenced the quality of life and choice of treatment.
PubMed ID
15040476 View in PubMed
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Exposure to formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and terpenes among office workers and associations with reported symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270061
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Jul;88(5):613-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Bo Glas
Berndt Stenberg
Hans Stenlund
Anna-Lena Sunesson
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Jul;88(5):613-22
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Formaldehyde - analysis - toxicity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Odds Ratio
Ozone - analysis - toxicity
Sick Building Syndrome - etiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Terpenes - analysis - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare exposure to formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and terpenes among office workers with and without sick building syndrome and the odds ratio for exposure. Are there significant differences?
In this cross-sectional study of office workers, we investigated the associations between exposure to formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, a-pinene, and D-limonene using a case-control analysis. Data on perceived general, mucosal, and skin symptoms were obtained by questionnaires. Personal exposure measurements of the compounds were performed among cases and controls, and the odds ratios for exposures to the substances, both singly and in combination, were investigated.
Exposures varied for formaldehyde between 0.23 and 45 µg/m(3), nitrogen dioxide between 0.26 and 110 µg/m(3), ozone between
PubMed ID
25274505 View in PubMed
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A higher score on the dermatology life quality index, being on systemic treatment and having a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis is associated with increased costs in patients with plaque psoriasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114574
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2013 Nov;93(6):684-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Mats Ekelund
Lotus Mallbris
Susanne Qvitzau
Berndt Stenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Economics, Pfizer AB, 19190 Sollentuna, Sweden. mats.ekelund@pfizer.com.
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2013 Nov;93(6):684-8
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Psoriatic - diagnosis - drug therapy - economics - psychology
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Costs
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Resources - economics - utilization
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sick Leave - economics
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of disease severity and costs from a societal perspective in patients with plaque psoriasis. Dermatologists in Sweden recruited 443 consecutive patients who had had no biological treatment during the past 12 months. Following a Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) assessment, subjects completed self-assessments on health status/quality of life and a healthcare resource utilization/work status questionnaire. The costs of healthcare resources and sick-leave due to plaque psoriasis were estimated and related to the subject's health status. A patient's Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and being on systemic therapy, or having diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis, appeared to be more strongly associated with direct and indirect costs than did their PASI. The cost of biological therapy should be considered from the perspective of the already high costs of patients with high DLQI undergoing traditional systemic treatment.
PubMed ID
23603935 View in PubMed
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Holter ECG monitoring in patients with perceived electrical hypersensitivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183578
Source
Int J Psychophysiol. 2003 Sep;49(3):227-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Monica Sandström
Eugene Lyskov
Rolf Hörnsten
Kjell Hansson Mild
Urban Wiklund
Peter Rask
Vasily Klucharev
Berndt Stenberg
Per Bjerle
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Working Life, P.O. Box 7654, S-907 13, Umea, Sweden. monsand@niwl.se
Source
Int J Psychophysiol. 2003 Sep;49(3):227-35
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory - methods - statistics & numerical data
Electromagnetic fields - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Perception - physiology
Abstract
Earlier studies have indicated that patients claiming to be sensitive to electromagnetic fields, so-called electrical hypersensitivity (EHS), have a dysbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation. This paper focuses on a possible dysbalance in the ANS among EHS patients by the use of long-term monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) in both a patient and a matched control group. At the same time, the environmental power frequency magnetic field was recorded for both groups in order to see if there was any difference in exposure between the groups. ECG, heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) as well as the magnetic field exposure were monitored for 24 h. Fourteen patients with perceived EHS symptoms were selected from the University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. Symptoms indicating autonomic nervous dysregulation were not part of the inclusion criteria of the patient group. Age and sex matched healthy subjects were used as controls. No differences were found between the groups regarding magnetic field exposure or the mean HR for 24 h. The HRV analyses showed that the high-frequency (HF) component did not have the expected increase with sleep onset and during nighttime in the EHS group. When separating the sleeping and awake time even less differences between the two conditions in the EHS patients, both for the low-frequency and HF components in the HRV spectrum, were seen. EHS patients had a disturbed pattern of circadian rhythms of HRV and showed a relatively 'flat' representation of hourly-recorded spectral power of the HF component of HRV.
PubMed ID
14507441 View in PubMed
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Inflammatory joint manifestations are prevalent in psoriasis: prevalence study of joint and axial involvement in psoriatic patients, and evaluation of a psoriatic and arthritic questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13927
Source
J Rheumatol. 2002 Dec;29(12):2577-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Gerd-Marie Alenius
Berndt Stenberg
Hans Stenlund
Magnus Lundblad
Solbritt Rantapää Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2002 Dec;29(12):2577-82
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Psoriatic - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Joints - pathology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spine - pathology
Spondylitis, Ankylosing - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of inflammatory manifestations, such as peripheral arthritis, axial disease, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (uSpA) and enthesopathies in patients with psoriasis, and to evaluate a psoriatic and arthritic questionnaire (PAQ) to identify patients with arthritis. Methods. An evaluation of a questionnaire (PAQ) in a hospital- and community-based population of 276 psoriatic patients, and clinical, radiological, and laboratory examination of the 202 patients answering the questionnaire and willing to participate in the subsequent study. Results. Ninety-seven patients (48%) were identified as having, or having had, inflammatory manifestations (peripheral arthritis, axial disease, uSpA, and enthesopathies). Sixty-seven patients (33%) had peripheral arthritis and/or axial disease, 30 of whom had not previously been diagnosed. A total PAQ score of 4 out of 8 was the best cutoff value detecting arthritis with a sensitivity of 60% and a specificity of 62.2%. A positive answer to the question "Have you ever thought you might have arthritis?" in combination with morning stiffness in peripheral joints for at least 60 min, had a sensitivity of 30% and a specificity of 91.1% and was significantly associated with peripheral arthritis and/or axial disease in multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of inflammatory joint/axial disease in this group of psoriatic patients. Almost half the patients with peripheral arthritis and/or axial disease had not previously been diagnosed. The PAQ did not, either as a total score or by combining questions, discriminate for arthritis in this population with psoriasis.
PubMed ID
12465155 View in PubMed
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Influence of childhood atopic dermatitis on future worklife.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70442
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005 Dec;31(6):474-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Miruna Nyrén
Magnus Lindberg
Berndt Stenberg
Margareta Svensson
Ake Svensson
Birgitta Meding
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Stockholm County Council and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. miruna.nyren@sll.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005 Dec;31(6):474-8
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Career Choice
Dermatitis, Atopic - chemically induced - epidemiology - physiopathology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to perform a population-based follow-up of people with childhood atopic dermatitis with respect to the possible influence on their worklife. METHODS: Medical records of the school health care services in Stockholm, Sweden, were reviewed for people born between 1960 and 1969. Altogether 600 persons with signs of atopic dermatitis ("cases") and 600 matched controls without eczema ("controls") were identified. Of these people, 405 cases and 378 controls answered a postal questionnaire focusing on choice of job, occupational exposure, past and present skin disease, and change of job due to eczema. RESULTS: The proportions of cases and controls in jobs with a high risk of hand eczema were similar, as was the exposure to water, detergents, chemicals, and hand washing. The self-reported cumulative prevalence of hand eczema was 42% for the cases and 13% for the controls (P
PubMed ID
16425589 View in PubMed
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Lifestyle and nickel allergy in a Swedish adolescent population: effects of piercing, tattooing and orthodontic appliances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127608
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2012 Nov;92(6):664-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Ronny Fors
Maurits Persson
Erik Bergström
Hans Stenlund
Birgitta Stymne
Berndt Stenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Orthodontics, Umeå University, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden. ronny.fors@odont.umu.se
Source
Acta Derm Venereol. 2012 Nov;92(6):664-8
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Age Factors
Body Piercing - adverse effects - trends
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet, Vegetarian
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Nickel - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Orthodontic Appliances - adverse effects - trends
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Tests
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tattooing - adverse effects - trends
Vocational Education
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of life-style practices in adolescents and their association with nickel allergy. Upper secondary school pupils (n?=?4,376; 15-23 years) were patch-tested for nickel aller-gy, follow-ing completion of a questionnaire (answered by?6,095). Almost 86% girls and 21% of boys reported piercing. More girls (6%) than boys (3%) had a tattoo. Twenty-six percent of the girls and 18% of the boys were regular smokers. Vegetarian/vegan diets were reported by 20% of girls and by 6% of boys. Piercing, female gender, and vocational programme increased the risk of nickel allergy, whereas orthodontic appliance treat-ment prior to piercing reduced the risk of nickel allergy. Pupils in vocational programmes had the highest prevalence of nickel allergy. Lifestyle behaviours are interconnected and cluster in subgroups of adolescents. Female sex, piercing and choice of educational programme are prominent lifestyle markers. A trend shift is observed, where more girls than boys report tattooing.
PubMed ID
22278701 View in PubMed
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Lifestyle factors and hand eczema in a Swedish adolescent population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142713
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2010 Mar;62(3):170-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Kari Röhrl
Berndt Stenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cancer and Surgery, Centre of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Norway.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2010 Mar;62(3):170-6
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Piercing - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet, Vegetarian - statistics & numerical data
Eczema - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Nickel - toxicity
Prevalence
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tattooing - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Hand eczema risk factors are potentially associated with lifestyle, and changes in lifestyle may influence the prevalence of this condition.
To report potential lifestyle risk factors and their association with hand eczema.
Cross-sectional questionnaire survey and standard patch test among Swedish upper secondary school children. The participation rate was 81% (6095/7543) for the questionnaire and 59% (4439/7543) for the test.
Girls reported piercing (84% versus 18%), tattooing (6% versus 3%), smoking (24% versus 16%) and vegetarianism (21% versus 7%) significantly more often than boys. Girls had significantly more hand eczema (7% versus 4%) than boys. Besides female sex (OR 2.0), allergic rhinitis (OR 1.8), flexural eczema (OR 4.5), and positive nickel test (OR 1.7) were significant risk factors in multivariate analysis. Piercing entailed a decreased risk (OR 0.6). Other lifestyle practices had no association with hand eczema. Vegetarian diet and dental braces which potentially increase oral nickel exposure were not associated with hand eczema prevalence in nickel sensitized individuals.
The studied lifestyle practices were more prevalent in girls. Smoking, tattooing, and diet were not associated with the occurrence of hand eczema.
PubMed ID
20565504 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.