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-160C/A polymorphism in the E-cadherin gene promoter and risk of hereditary, familial and sporadic prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17926
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Apr 10;109(3):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2004
Author
Jonsson B-A
Adami H-O
Hägglund M
Bergh A
Göransson I
Stattin P
Wiklund F
Grönberg H
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Apr 10;109(3):348-52
Date
Apr-10-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadherins - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Prostate
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The E-cadherin (CDH1) gene has been associated with prostate carcinogenesis. The C/A polymorphism--160 base pairs relative to the transcription start site has been shown to decrease gene transcription. We analyzed the association between this polymorphism and the risk of sporadic, familial (2 close relatives) and hereditary (3 or more close relatives) prostate cancer. We combined data from 3 population-based epidemiologic studies in Sweden encompassing altogether 1,036 prostate cancer cases and 669 controls that were genotyped for the short nucleotide polymorphism. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated through unconditional logistic regression. We found no significant association between the A-allele and sporadic (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8-1.2) or familial (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 0.9-2.2) prostate cancer. In contrast, risk of hereditary cancer was increased among heterozygote CA carriers (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.7) and particularly among homozygote AA carriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.4-4.9). Our data indicate that the -160 single nucleotide polymorphism in CDH1 is a low-penetrant prostate cancer susceptibility gene that might explain a proportion of familial and notably hereditary prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
14961571 View in PubMed
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Association between the presence of bacterial 16S RNA in prostate specimens taken during transurethral resection of prostate and subsequent risk of prostate cancer (Sweden).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80484
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Nov;17(9):1127-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Alexeyev O.
Bergh J.
Marklund I.
Thellenberg-Karlsson C.
Wiklund F.
Grönberg H.
Bergh A.
Elgh F.
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biosciences/Pathology, Umeå University, S-90185, Umeå, Sweden. oleg.alexeyev@medbio.umu.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2006 Nov;17(9):1127-33
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
DNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
Disease Progression
Follow-Up Studies
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Propionibacterium acnes - isolation & purification
Prostatic Hyperplasia - microbiology - surgery
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - microbiology - surgery
RNA, Bacterial - isolation & purification
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - isolation & purification
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Sequence Analysis, RNA
Severity of Illness Index
Specimen Handling
Sweden - epidemiology
Transurethral Resection of Prostate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study bacterial 16S RNA in archival prostate samples from 352 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and evaluate whether the presence of bacterial DNA was different in those who later developed prostate cancer (n = 171) and in the matched controls that did not progress to cancer (n = 181). METHODS: 16S DNA PCR followed by cloning and sequencing the positive samples. RESULTS: In 96/352 (27%) of the prostate tissue specimens 16S RNA were detected. Sequence analysis revealed Propionibacterium acnes as the predominant microorganism (23% of 16S RNA positive patients). The second most frequent isolate-Escherichia coli was found in 12 (12%) patients. The other isolates included Pseudomonas sp. (3 patients), Actinomyces sp. (2), Streptococcus mutans (1), Corynebacterium sp. (2), Nocardioides sp. (1), Rhodococcus sp. (1) Veillonella sp. (2). In P. acnes positive samples 62% exhibited severe histological inflammation versus 50% in the bacteria-negative group (p = 0.602). The presence of P. acnes in the prostate was associated with prostate cancer development (OR 2.17, 95% CI 0.77-6.95). CONCLUSIONS: This study has revealed P. acnes as the most common bacteria in the prostate in BPH. Further studies are needed to clarify its role in contributing to the development of prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
17006718 View in PubMed
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Bone marrow fibrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia correlates to biological factors, treatment response and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87375
Source
Leukemia. 2008 Mar;22(3):504-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Norén-Nyström U.
Roos G.
Bergh A.
Botling J.
Lönnerholm G.
Porwit A.
Heyman M.
Forestier E.
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umea University, Umea, Sweden. ulrika.norennystrom@pediatri.umu.se
Source
Leukemia. 2008 Mar;22(3):504-10
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aneuploidy
Biopsy
Bone Marrow Examination
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia-Lymphoma, Adult T-Cell - pathology - therapy
Male
Myelofibrosis - etiology - pathology
Neoplasm, Residual
Precursor B-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - pathology - therapy
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - classification - complications - mortality - pathology - therapy
Prognosis
Reticulin - analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We retrospectively evaluated reticulin fiber density (RFD) in 166 diagnostic bone marrow (BM) biopsies and 62 biopsies obtained at treatment day 29 from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients with B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL showed higher RFD as compared to patients with T-cell ALL (P or = 10(-4) presented higher RFD at diagnosis compared to patients with MRD
PubMed ID
18094715 View in PubMed
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Nordic consensus on treatment of undescended testes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83368
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 May;96(5):638-43
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Ritzén E Martin
Bergh A.
Bjerknes R.
Christiansen P.
Cortes D.
Haugen S E
Jörgensen N.
Kollin C.
Lindahl S.
Läckgren G.
Main K M
Nordenskjöld A.
Rajpert-De Meyts E.
Söder O.
Taskinen S.
Thorsson A.
Thorup J.
Toppari J.
Virtanen H.
Author Affiliation
Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Martin.Ritzen@ki.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 May;96(5):638-43
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia
Child
Cryptorchidism - drug therapy - embryology - surgery
Decision Trees
Humans
Infant
Male
Abstract
AIM: To reach consensus among specialists from the Nordic countries on the present state-of-the-art in treatment of undescended testicles. METHODS: A group of specialists in testicular physiology, paediatric surgery/urology, endocrinology, andrology, pathology and anaesthesiology from all the Nordic countries met for two days. Before the meeting, reviews of the literature had been prepared by the participants. RECOMMENDATIONS: The group came to the following unanimous conclusions: (1) In general, hormonal treatment is not recommended, considering the poor immediate results and the possible long term adverse effects on spermatogenesis. Thus, surgery is to be preferred. (2) Orchiopexy should be done between 6 and 12 months of age, or upon diagnosis, if that occurs later. (3) Orchiopexy before age one year should only be done at centres with both paediatric surgeons/urologists and paediatric anaesthesiologists. (4) If a testis is found to be undescended at any age after 6 months, the patient should be referred for surgery--to paediatric rather than general surgeons/urologists if the boy is less than one year old or if he has bilateral or non-palpable testes, or if he has got relapse of cryptorchidism.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2007 May;96(5):608-1017462052
PubMed ID
17326760 View in PubMed
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