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The pain experience and future expectations of chronic low back pain patients following spinal fusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92902
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Apr;17(7B):153-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Bentsen Signe Berit
Rustøen Tone
Wahl Astrid Klopstad
Miaskowski Christine
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Education, Stord/Haugesund University College, Haugesund, Norway. signe.bentsen@hsh.no
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Apr;17(7B):153-9
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesia - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Linear Models
Low Back Pain - diagnosis - etiology - psychology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Negativism
Norway
Nursing Methodology Research
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Fusion - adverse effects - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIM: In a sample of patients who underwent instrumented spinal fusions for chronic low back pain (CLBP), the purposes of this study were: to determine the amount of pain patients experienced and to determine the impact of length of time since surgery, use of pain medication and their outlook on the future on these pain intensity scores. BACKGROUND: An increasing number of people report CLBP and one of the treatments is instrumented fusion. METHOD: The study used a cross-sectional design. Visual analogue scales were used to measure pain intensity in different locations and a single item measured patients' view of the future. Data were collected in November 2001. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 101 patients (71% women) aged 26-59 years treated with instrumented fusion 1-8 years ago. As many as 87% reported pain 1-8 years after the surgery. Most patients reported pain of low-to-moderate intensity in the neck and shoulders, back and hips, feet and legs and in total pain. As many as 45% of the patients did not take pain medication and patients using more analgesics reported more pain than those using fewer analgesics (p
PubMed ID
18578791 View in PubMed
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Quality of life in chronic low back pain patients treated with instrumented fusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92482
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(15):2061-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Bentsen Signe Berit
Hanestad Berit Rokne
Rustøen Tone
Wahl Astrid Klopstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Education, Stord/Haugesund University College, Bergen, Norway. signe.bentsen@hsh.no
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(15):2061-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Intervertebral Disk Displacement - complications - diagnosis - surgery
Low Back Pain - etiology - psychology
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Methodology Research
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Fusion - adverse effects - instrumentation - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIM: The aim of this study was to examine pain and quality of life in a group of preoperative chronic low back pain patients (n = 25) and a group of postoperative chronic low back pain patients (n = 101) treated with instrumented fusion 1-8 years ago. BACKGROUND: Reduced quality of life is common in chronic low back pain patients and the aim of treatment is to improve quality of life. DESIGN: In the present study, a comparative survey design was used. METHODS: The McGill Pain Questionnaire and the SF-36 Health Survey were used to examine pain and quality of life. RESULTS: The pre- and postoperative groups did not differ with regard to age, gender, education, other chronic conditions or previous spinal surgery. Compared with the preoperative group, the postoperative group reported significantly lower total, sensory, affective and evaluative pain, used less pain medication (p or =0.8 for all pain components and > or =0.4 for all SF-36 components, except for general health (effect size = 0.009). With regard to long-term follow-up, patients who underwent surgery 5-8 years ago reported better physical role functioning (p
PubMed ID
18705783 View in PubMed
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What determines subjective health status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: importance of symptoms in subjective health status of COPD patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90721
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:115
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bentsen Signe Berit
Henriksen Anne Hildur
Wentzel-Larsen Tore
Hanestad Berit Rokne
Wahl Astrid Klopstad
Author Affiliation
Stord/Haugesund University College, Department of Nursing Education, Haugesund, Norway. signe.bentsen@hsh.no
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:115
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - physiopathology - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Subjective health status is the result of an interaction between physiological and psychosocial factors in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there is little understanding of multivariate explanations of subjective health status in COPD. The purpose of this study was to explore what determines subjective health status in COPD by evaluating the relationships between background variables such as age and sex, predicted FEV1%, oxygen saturation, breathlessness, anxiety and depression, exercise capacity, and physical and mental health. METHODS: This study had a cross-sectional design, and included 100 COPD patients (51% men, mean age 66.1 years). Lung function was assessed by predicted FEV1%, oxygen saturation by transcutaneous pulse oximeter, symptoms with the St George Respiratory Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, physical function with the Incremental Shuttle Walking Test, and subjective health status with the SF-36 health survey. Linear regression analysis was used. RESULTS: Older patients reported less breathlessness and women reported more anxiety (p
PubMed ID
19094216 View in PubMed
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