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Characteristics and survival of adult Swedish PAH and CTEPH patients 2000-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281202
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2016 Aug;50(4):243-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Göran Rådegran
Barbro Kjellström
Björn Ekmehag
Flemming Larsen
Bengt Rundqvist
Sofia Berg Blomquist
Carola Gustafsson
Roger Hesselstrand
Monica Karlsson
Björn Kornhall
Magnus Nisell
Liselotte Persson
Henrik Ryftenius
Maria Selin
Bengt Ullman
Kent Wall
Gerhard Wikström
Maria Willehadson
Kjell Jansson
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2016 Aug;50(4):243-50
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comorbidity
Familial Primary Pulmonary Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Male
Patient Acuity
Pulmonary Embolism - complications
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The Swedish Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Register (SPAHR) is an open continuous register, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) patients from 2000 and onwards. We hereby launch the first data from SPAHR, defining baseline characteristics and survival of Swedish PAH and CTEPH patients.
Incident PAH and CTEPH patients 2008-2014 from all seven Swedish PAH-centres were specifically reviewed.
There were 457 PAH (median age: 67 years, 64% female) and 183 CTEPH (median age: 70 years, 50% female) patients, whereof 77 and 81%, respectively, were in functional class III-IV at diagnosis. Systemic hypertension, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease and atrial fibrillation were common comorbidities, particularly in those >65 years. One-, 3- and 5-year survival was 85%, 71% and 59% for PAH patients. Corresponding numbers for CTEPH patients with versus without pulmonary endarterectomy were 96%, 89% and 86% versus 91%, 75% and 69%, respectively. In 2014, the incidence of IPAH/HPAH, associated PAH and CTEPH was 5, 3 and 2 per million inhabitants and year, and the prevalence was 25, 24 and 19 per million inhabitants.
The majority of the PAH and CTEPH patients were diagnosed at age >65 years, in functional class III-IV, and exhibiting several comorbidities. PAH survival in SPAHR was similar to other registers.
PubMed ID
27146648 View in PubMed
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Patient-centred home-based management of heart failure. Findings from a randomised clinical trial evaluating a tablet computer for self-care, quality of life and effects on knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271540
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2015 Aug;49(4):193-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ewa Hägglund
Patrik Lyngå
Filippa Frie
Bengt Ullman
Hans Persson
Michael Melin
Inger Hagerman
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2015 Aug;49(4):193-9
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Weight
Computers, Handheld
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Failure - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Home Care Services, Hospital-Based
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Readmission
Patient-Centered Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Self Care - instrumentation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - instrumentation
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate whether a new home intervention system (HIS, OPTILOGG(®)) consisting of a specialised software, a tablet computer (tablet) wirelessly connected to a weight scale may improve self-care behaviour, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), knowledge about heart failure (HF) and reduce hospital days due to HF.
82 patients (32% females) with mean age: 75 ± 8 years hospitalised with HF were randomised at discharge to an intervention group (IG) equipped with the HIS or to a control group (CG) receiving standard HF information only. The tablet contained information about HF and lifestyle advice according to current guidelines. It also showed present dose of diuretic, changes in patient-measured weight and HRQoL over time.
After 3 months the IG displayed a dramatic improvement in self-care with p
PubMed ID
25968968 View in PubMed
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Randomized controlled intervention in cardiovascular drug treatment in nursing homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71234
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2003 Oct-Nov;12(7):589-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johanna Ulfvarson
Johanna Adami
Bengt Ullman
Regina Wredling
Marie Reilly
Christer von Bahr
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm Söder Hospital, Institution for Nursing, Sweden.
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2003 Oct-Nov;12(7):589-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy - pathology
Female
Health Services for the Aged
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Nursing Homes
Physician's Practice Patterns
Quality of Life
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study drug treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases (heart failure, post-myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, hypertonia or cardiac valvular disease) in nursing homes and assess effect of medication advice. INTERVENTION: The patients were randomized to an intervention or control group. Medication reviews were made by one specialist in clinical pharmacology and one in cardiology. Symptoms related to heart failure or adverse reactions to cardiovascular drugs were recorded using a questionnaire. Quality of life and activities of daily living (ADL) were assessed and follow-ups performed after 2 weeks and 3 months. Outcome measures were changes of drug therapy and the global scores computed from symptoms scales. RESULTS: Eighty patients were randomized. They had a mean age of 87 years and their average number of drugs was 9.6. Changed drug therapy was suggested in 40 patients and the advice was followed by the responsible physicians in 19 patients. The physicians mostly followed advice for changed furosemide therapy but not for introducing an ACE-inhibitor, probably due to uncertain diagnosis and need for follow-up after initiation of such therapy. No significant changes from baseline to later follow-up were found in the mean total scores of any questionnaire. CONCLUSION: Intervention did not affect cardiovascular symptoms. Drug revisions should involve more than one class of drugs in order to be cost-effective.
PubMed ID
14558182 View in PubMed
Less detail