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An international outbreak of Vero cytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 infection amongst tourists; a challenge for the European infectious disease surveillance network

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33056
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Oct;123(2):217-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
Pebody, RG
Furtado, C
Rojas, A
McCarthy, N
Nylen, G
Ruutu, P
Leino, T
Chalmers, R
de Jong, B
Donnelly, M
Fisher, I
Gilham, C
Graverson, L
Cheasty, T
Willshaw, G
Navarro, M
Salmon, R
Leinikki, P
Wall, P
Bartlett, C
Author Affiliation
European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1999 Oct;123(2):217-23
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Toxins - biosynthesis
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Notification
Disease Outbreaks
Enterotoxins - biosynthesis
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology
Escherichia coli O157 - metabolism
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Shiga-Like Toxin I
Time Factors
Travel
Water Microbiology
Abstract
In March 1997, an outbreak of Vero cytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 (VTEC) infection occurred amongst holidaymakers returning from Fuerteventura, Canary Islands. For the investigation, a confirmed case was an individual staying in Fuerteventura during March 1997, with either E. coli O157 VTEC isolated in stool, HUS or serological evidence of recent infection; a probable case was an individual with bloody diarrhoea without laboratory confirmation. Local and Europe-wide active case finding was undertaken through national centres, Salm-Net and the European Programme of Intervention Epidemiology, followed by a case-control study. Fourteen confirmed and one probable case were identified from England (7), Finland (5), Wales (1), Sweden (1) and Denmark (1) staying in four hotels. Three of the four hotels were supplied with water from a private well which appeared to be the probable vehicle of transmission. The case-control study showed illness was associated with consumption of raw vegetables (OR 8.4, 95% CI 1-5-48.2) which may have been washed in well water. This investigation shows the importance of international collaboration in the detection and investigation of clusters of enteric infection.
PubMed ID
10579440 View in PubMed
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