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The association between cold extremes and neonatal mortality in Swedish Sápmi from 1800 to 1895.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301300
Source
Glob Health Action. 2019; 12(1):1623609
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2019
Author
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
a Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR) , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Glob Health Action. 2019; 12(1):1623609
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Background: Studies in which the association between temperature and neonatal mortality (deaths during the first 28 days of life) is tracked over extended periods that cover demographic, economic and epidemiological transitions are quite limited. From previous research about the demographic transition in Swedish Sápmi, we know that infant and child mortality was generally higher among the indigenous (Sami) population compared to non-indigenous populations. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyse the association between extreme temperatures and neonatal mortality among the Sami and non-Sami population in Swedish Sápmi (Lapland) during the nineteenth century. Methods: Data from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, were used to identify neonatal deaths. We used monthly mean temperature in Tornedalen and identified cold and warm month (5th and 95th) percentiles. Monthly death counts from extreme temperatures were modelled using negative binomial regression. We computed relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusting for time trends and seasonality. Results: Overall, the neonatal mortality rate was higher among Sami compared to non-Sami infants (62/1,000 vs 35/1,000 live births), although the differences between the two populations decreased after 1860. For the Sami population prior 1860, the results revealed a higher neonatal incidence rate during cold winter months (
PubMed ID
31232229 View in PubMed
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Association of climatic factors with infectious diseases in the Arctic and subarctic region--a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260450
Source
Glob Health Action. 2014;7:24161
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christina Hedlund
Yulia Blomstedt
Barbara Schumann
Source
Glob Health Action. 2014;7:24161
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Climate
Climate change
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Weather
Abstract
The Arctic and subarctic area are likely to be highly affected by climate change, with possible impacts on human health due to effects on food security and infectious diseases.
To investigate the evidence for an association between climatic factors and infectious diseases, and to identify the most climate-sensitive diseases and vulnerable populations in the Arctic and subarctic region.
A systematic review was conducted. A search was made in PubMed, with the last update in May 2013. Inclusion criteria included human cases of infectious disease as outcome, climate or weather factor as exposure, and Arctic or subarctic areas as study origin. Narrative reviews, case reports, and projection studies were excluded. Abstracts and selected full texts were read and evaluated by two independent readers. A data collection sheet and an adjusted version of the SIGN methodology checklist were used to assess the quality grade of each article.
In total, 1953 abstracts were initially found, of which finally 29 articles were included. Almost half of the studies were carried out in Canada (n=14), the rest from Sweden (n=6), Finland (n=4), Norway (n=2), Russia (n=2), and Alaska, US (n=1). Articles were analyzed by disease group: food- and waterborne diseases, vector-borne diseases, airborne viral- and airborne bacterial diseases. Strong evidence was found in our review for an association between climatic factors and food- and waterborne diseases. The scientific evidence for a link between climate and specific vector- and rodent-borne diseases was weak due to that only a few diseases being addressed in more than one publication, although several articles were of very high quality. Air temperature and humidity seem to be important climatic factors to investigate further for viral- and bacterial airborne diseases, but from our results no conclusion about a causal relationship could be drawn.
More studies of high quality are needed to investigate the adverse health impacts of weather and climatic factors in the Arctic and subarctic region. No studies from Greenland or Iceland were found, and only a few from Siberia and Alaska. Disease and syndromic surveillance should be part of climate change adaptation measures in the Arctic and subarctic regions, with monitoring of extreme weather events known to pose a risk for certain infectious diseases implemented at the community level.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24990685 View in PubMed
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Association of seasonal climate variability and age-specific mortality in northern Sweden before the onset of industrialization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260800
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jul;11(7):6940-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Joacim Rocklöv
Sören Edvinsson
Per Arnqvist
Sara Sjöstedt de Luna
Barbara Schumann
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Jul;11(7):6940-54
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Climate
Humans
Industry
Infant
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Weather
Young Adult
Abstract
Little is known about health impacts of climate in pre-industrial societies. We used historical data to investigate the association of temperature and precipitation with total and age-specific mortality in Skellefteå, northern Sweden, between 1749 and 1859.
We retrieved digitized aggregated population data of the Skellefteå parish, and monthly temperature and precipitation measures. A generalized linear model was established for year to year variability in deaths by annual and seasonal average temperature and cumulative precipitation using a negative binomial function, accounting for long-term trends in population size. The final full model included temperature and precipitation of all four seasons simultaneously. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for total, sex- and age-specific mortality.
In the full model, only autumn precipitation proved statistically significant (RR 1.02; CI 1.00-1.03, per 1cm increase of autumn precipitation), while winter temperature (RR 0.98; CI 0.95-1.00, per 1 °C increase in temperature) and spring precipitation (RR 0.98; CI 0.97-1.00 per 1 cm increase in precipitation) approached significance. Similar effects were observed for men and women. The impact of climate variability on mortality was strongest in children aged 3-9, and partly also in older children. Infants, on the other hand, appeared to be less affected by unfavourable climate conditions.
In this pre-industrial rural region in northern Sweden, higher levels of rain during the autumn increased the annual number of deaths. Harvest quality might be one critical factor in the causal pathway, affecting nutritional status and susceptibility to infectious diseases. Autumn rain probably also contributed to the spread of air-borne diseases in crowded living conditions. Children beyond infancy appeared most vulnerable to climate impacts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25003551 View in PubMed
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Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880-1950.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304298
Source
Environ Res. 2021 Jan; 192:110400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-2021
Author
Johan Junkka
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Res. 2021 Jan; 192:110400
Date
Jan-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
In resource-poor societies, neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life) is usually very high. Young infants are particularly vulnerable to environmental health risks, which are modified by socioeconomic factors that change over time. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and neonatal mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition.
Parish register data and temperature data in coastal Västerbotten, Sweden, between 1880 and 1950 were used. Total and sex-specific neonatal mortality was modelled as a function of mean temperature, adjusting for age, seasonality and calendar time, using discrete-time survival analysis. A linear threshold function was applied with a cut point at 14.5 °C (the minimum mortality temperature). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Further analyses were stratified by study period (1800-1899, 1900-1929, and 1930-1950).
Neonatal mortality was 32.1 deaths/1000 live births, higher in boys than in girls, and decreased between 1880 and 1950, with high inter-annual variability. Mean daily temperature was +2.5 °C, ranging from -40.9 °C to +28.8 °C. At -20 °C, the OR of neonatal death was 1.56 (CI 1.30-1.87) compared to the reference at +14.5 °C. Among girls, the OR of mortality at -20 °C was 1.17 (0.88-1.54), and among boys, it was 1.94 (1.53-2.45). A temperature increase from +14.5 to +20 °C was associated with a 25% increase of neonatal mortality (OR 1.25, CI 1.04-1.50). Heat- and cold-related risks were lowest between 1900 and 1929.
In this remote sub-Arctic region undergoing socio-economic changes, we found an increased mortality risk in neonates related to low but also to high temperature. Climate vulnerability varied across time and was particularly high among boys. This demonstrates that environmental impacts on human health are complex and highly dependent on the specific local context, with many, often unknown, contributing determinants of vulnerability.
PubMed ID
33129863 View in PubMed
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Climate vulnerability of Swedish newborns: Gender differences and time trends of temperature-related neonatal mortality, 1880-1950.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311776
Source
Environ Res. 2021 01; 192:110400
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2021
Author
Johan Junkka
Lena Karlsson
Erling Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Res. 2021 01; 192:110400
Date
01-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Climate
Female
Hot Temperature
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mortality
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperature
Abstract
In resource-poor societies, neonatal mortality (death in the first 28 days of life) is usually very high. Young infants are particularly vulnerable to environmental health risks, which are modified by socioeconomic factors that change over time. We investigated the association between ambient temperature and neonatal mortality in northern Sweden during the demographic transition.
Parish register data and temperature data in coastal Västerbotten, Sweden, between 1880 and 1950 were used. Total and sex-specific neonatal mortality was modelled as a function of mean temperature, adjusting for age, seasonality and calendar time, using discrete-time survival analysis. A linear threshold function was applied with a cut point at 14.5 °C (the minimum mortality temperature). Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Further analyses were stratified by study period (1800-1899, 1900-1929, and 1930-1950).
Neonatal mortality was 32.1 deaths/1000 live births, higher in boys than in girls, and decreased between 1880 and 1950, with high inter-annual variability. Mean daily temperature was +2.5 °C, ranging from -40.9 °C to +28.8 °C. At -20 °C, the OR of neonatal death was 1.56 (CI 1.30-1.87) compared to the reference at +14.5 °C. Among girls, the OR of mortality at -20 °C was 1.17 (0.88-1.54), and among boys, it was 1.94 (1.53-2.45). A temperature increase from +14.5 to +20 °C was associated with a 25% increase of neonatal mortality (OR 1.25, CI 1.04-1.50). Heat- and cold-related risks were lowest between 1900 and 1929.
In this remote sub-Arctic region undergoing socio-economic changes, we found an increased mortality risk in neonates related to low but also to high temperature. Climate vulnerability varied across time and was particularly high among boys. This demonstrates that environmental impacts on human health are complex and highly dependent on the specific local context, with many, often unknown, contributing determinants of vulnerability.
PubMed ID
33129863 View in PubMed
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Effect of extreme hot and cold weather on cause-specific hospitalizations in Sweden: A time series analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311758
Source
Environ Res. 2021 02; 193:110535
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2021
Author
Osvaldo Fonseca-Rodríguez
Scott C Sheridan
Erling Häggström Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden; Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: osvaldo.fonseca@umu.se.
Source
Environ Res. 2021 02; 193:110535
Date
02-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cold Temperature
Hospitalization
Hot Temperature
Humans
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Weather
Abstract
Considering that several meteorological variables can contribute to weather vulnerability, the estimation of their synergetic effects on health is particularly useful. The spatial synoptic classification (SSC) has been used in biometeorological applications to estimate the effect of the entire suite of weather conditions on human morbidity and mortality. In this study, we assessed the relationships between extremely hot and dry (dry tropical plus, DT+) and hot and moist (moist tropical plus, MT+) weather types in summer and extremely cold and dry (dry polar plus, DP+) and cold and moist (moist polar, MP+) weather types in winter and cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations by age and sex. Time-series quasi-Poisson regression with distributed lags was used to assess the relationship between oppressive weather types and daily hospitalizations over 14 subsequent days in the extended summer (May to August) and 28 subsequent days during the extended winter (November to March) over 24 years in 4 Swedish locations from 1991 to 2014. In summer, exposure to hot weather types appeared to reduce cardiovascular hospitalizations while increased the risk of hospitalizations for respiratory diseases, mainly related to MT+. In winter, the effect of cold weather on both cause-specific hospitalizations was small; however, MP+ was related to a delayed increase in cardiovascular hospitalizations, whilst MP+ and DP + increased the risk of hospitalizations due to respiratory diseases. This study provides useful information for the staff of hospitals and elderly care centers who can help to implement protective measures for patients and residents. Also, our results could be helpful for vulnerable people who can adopt protective measures to reduce health risks.
PubMed ID
33271141 View in PubMed
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Hot and cold weather based on the spatial synoptic classification and cause-specific mortality in Sweden: a time-stratified case-crossover study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306164
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2020 Sep; 64(9):1435-1449
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2020
Author
Osvaldo Fonseca-Rodríguez
Scott C Sheridan
Erling Häggström Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. osvaldo.fonseca@umu.se.
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2020 Sep; 64(9):1435-1449
Date
Sep-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cold Temperature
Cross-Over Studies
Hot Temperature
Mortality
Seasons
Sweden
Weather
Abstract
The spatial synoptic classification (SSC) is a holistic categorical assessment of the daily weather conditions at specific locations; it is a useful tool for assessing weather effects on health. In this study, we assessed (a) the effect of hot weather types and the duration of heat events on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in summer and (b) the effect of cold weather types and the duration of cold events on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality in winter. A time-stratified case-crossover design combined with a distributed lag nonlinear model was carried out to investigate the association of weather types with cause-specific mortality in two southern (Skåne and Stockholm) and two northern (Jämtland and Västerbotten) locations in Sweden. During summer, in the southern locations, the Moist Tropical (MT) and Dry Tropical (DT) weather types increased cardiovascular and respiratory mortality at shorter lags; both hot weather types substantially increased respiratory mortality mainly in Skåne. The impact of heat events on mortality by cardiovascular and respiratory diseases was more important in the southern than in the northern locations at lag 0. The cumulative effect of MT, DT and heat events lagged over 14 days was particularly high for respiratory mortality in all locations except in Jämtland, though these did not show a clear effect on cardiovascular mortality. During winter, the dry polar and moist polar weather types and cold events showed a negligible effect on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality. This study provides valuable information about the relationship between hot oppressive weather types with cause-specific mortality; however, the cold weather types may not capture sufficiently effects on cause-specific mortality in this sub-Arctic region.
PubMed ID
32328787 View in PubMed
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The influence of seasonal climate variability on mortality in pre-industrial Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114952
Source
Glob Health Action. 2013;6:20153
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Barbara Schumann
Sören Edvinsson
Birgitta Evengård
Joacim Rocklöv
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå Centre for Global Health Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. barbara.schumann@epiph.umu.se
Source
Glob Health Action. 2013;6:20153
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Mortality - history - trends
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Weather
Abstract
Recent studies have shown an association between weather and climatic factors with mortality, cardiovascular and infectious diseases. We used historical data to investigate the impact of seasonal temperature and precipitation on total mortality in Uppsala, Sweden, during the first two stages of the demographic transition, 1749-1859.
We retrieved mortality and population numbers of the Uppsala Domkyrka parish from digitised parish records and obtained monthly temperature and precipitation measures recorded in Uppsala during that time. Statistical models were established for year-to-year variability in deaths by annual and seasonal temperature and precipitation, adjusting for longer time trends. In a second step, a model was established for three different periods to study changes in the association of climate variability and mortality over time. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.
Precipitation during spring and autumn was significantly associated with annual mortality (spring RR 0.982, CI 0.965-1.000; autumn RR 1.018, CI 1.004-1.032, respectively, per centimetre increase of precipitation). Higher springtime temperature decreased annual mortality, while higher summer temperature increased the death toll; however, both were only borderline significant (p=0.07). The significant effect of springtime precipitation for mortality was present only in the first two periods (1749-1785 and 1786-1824). On the contrary, the overall effect of autumn precipitation was mainly due to its relevance during the last period, 1825-1859 (RR 1.024, CI 0.997-1.052). At that time, higher winter precipitation was found to decrease mortality.
In urban Uppsala, during the 18th and 19th century, precipitation appeared to be a stronger predictor for mortality than temperature. Higher spring precipitation decreased and higher autumn precipitation increased the number of deaths. However, this association differed before and during the early stages of industrialisation. Further research shall take age-specific differences into account, as well as changes in socio-economic conditions during that time.
Notes
Cites: Milbank Mem Fund Q. 1971 Oct;49(4):509-385155251
Cites: Soc Hist Med. 1992 Apr;5(1):71-9411612777
Cites: Popul Stud (Camb). 2005 Nov;59(3):321-3716249153
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Dec;64(5):523-3316440614
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Jul;80(7):615-2617468879
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Cites: Zoonoses Public Health. 2009 Apr;56(3):150-618771520
PubMed ID
23561027 View in PubMed
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Neonatal Mortality and Temperature in Two Northern Swedish Rural Parishes, 1860-1899-The Significance of Ethnicity and Gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306885
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 02 13; 17(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-13-2020
Author
Lena Karlsson
Erling H Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR), Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 02 13; 17(4):
Date
02-13-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - ethnology
Male
Pregnancy
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperature
Vulnerable Populations
Weather
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the association between season of birth and daily temperature for neonatal mortality in two Swedish rural parishes between 1860 and 1899. Further, we aimed to study whether the association varied according to ethnicity (indigenous Sami reindeer herders and non-Sami settlers) and gender. The source material for this study comprised digitized parish records from the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, combined with local weather data provided by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute. Using a time event-history approach, we investigated the association between daily temperature (at birth and up to 28 days after birth) and the risk of neonatal death during the coldest months (November through March). The results showed that Sami neonatal mortality was highest during winter and that the Sami neonatal mortality risk decreased with higher temperatures on the day of birth. Male neonatal risk decreased with higher temperatures during the days following birth, while no effect of temperature was observed among female neonates. We conclude that weather vulnerability differed between genders and between the indigenous and non-indigenous populations.
PubMed ID
32070044 View in PubMed
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Season of birth, stillbirths, and neonatal mortality in Sweden: the Sami and non-Sami population, 1800-1899.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309426
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1629784
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2019
Author
Lena Karlsson
Erling Häggström Lundevaller
Barbara Schumann
Author Affiliation
a Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR) , Umeå University , Umeå , Sweden.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1629784
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Breast Feeding - ethnology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality - ethnology - trends
Male
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Stillbirth - ethnology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seasonal patterns of neonatal mortality and stillbirths have been found around the world. However, little is known about the association between season of birth and infant mortality of pre-industrial societies in a subarctic environment. In this study, we compared how season of birth affected the neonatal and stillbirth risk among the Sami and non-Sami in Swedish Sápmi during the nineteenth century. Using digitised parish records from the Demographic Data Base at Umeå University, we applied logistic regression models for estimating the association of season of birth with stillbirths and neonatal mortality, respectively. Higher neonatal mortality was found among the winter- and autumn-born Sami, compared to summer-born infants. Stillbirth risk was higher during autumn compared to summer among the Sami, whereas we found no seasonal differences in mortality among the non-Sami population. We relate the higher neonatal mortality risk among winter-born Sami to differences in seasonality of living conditions associated with reindeer herding.
PubMed ID
31221048 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.