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24 records – page 1 of 3.

Adrenaline in out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation. Does it make any difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11388
Source
Resuscitation. 1995 Jun;29(3):195-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
B. Wennerblom
A. Axelsson
A. Bång
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 1995 Jun;29(3):195-201
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Emergencies
Emergency medical services
Epinephrine - therapeutic use
Female
Heart Arrest - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A large proportion of cardiac arrests outside hospital are caused by ventricular fibrillation. Although it is frequently used, the exact role of treatment with adrenaline in these patients remains to be determined. AIM: To describe the proportion of patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found in ventricular fibrillation who survived and were discharged from hospital in relation to whether they were treated with adrenaline prior to hospital admission. PATIENTS AND TREATMENT: All the patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found in ventricular fibrillation in Göteborg between 1981 and 1992 in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated by our emergency medical service (EMS). During the observation period, some of the EMS staff were authorized to give medication and some were not. RESULTS: In all, 1360 patients were found in ventricular fibrillation and detailed information was available in 1203 cases (88%). Adrenaline was given in 417 cases (35%). Among patients with sustained ventricular fibrillation, those who received adrenaline experienced the return of spontaneous circulation more frequently (P
PubMed ID
7667549 View in PubMed
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[A special mobile unit system in Gothenburg: early treatment outside the hospital in acute myocardial infarction or heart arrest]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55557
Source
Lakartidningen. 1987 Sep 30;84(40):3177-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1987

Continuation of CPR on admission to emergency department after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Occurrence, characteristics and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34511
Source
Resuscitation. 1997 Jan;33(3):223-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
A. Axelsson
A. Bång
B. Wennerblom
L. Waagstein
M. Dellborg
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 1997 Jan;33(3):223-31
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Electric Countershock
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - diagnosis
Abstract
AIM: To describe the occurrence, characteristics and outcome among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who required continuation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on admission to the emergency department. PATIENTS: all patients in the municipality of Göteborg who suffered out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, were reached by the emergency medical service (EMS) system and in whom CPR was initiated. Period for inclusion in study: 1 Oct. 1980-31 Dec. 1992. RESULTS: of 334 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, 2,319 (68%) were receiving on-going CPR at the time of admission to hospital. Of these, 137 patients (6%) were hospitalized alive and 28 (1.2%) could be discharged from hospital. Of these patients, 39% had a cerebral performance categories (CPC) score of 1 (no cerebral deficiency), 18% had a CPC score of 2 (moderate cerebral deficiency), 36% had a CPC score of 3 (severe cerebral deficiency) and 7% had a CPC score of 4 (coma) at discharge. Among patients discharged. 76% were alive after 1 year. CONCLUSION: among consecutive patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, CPR was ongoing in 68% of them on admission to hospital. Among these patients, 6% were hospitalized alive and 1.2% were discharged from hospital. Thus, among patients with ongoing CPR on admission to hospital, survivors can be found but they are few in numbers and extensive cerebral damage is frequently present.
Notes
Comment In: Resuscitation. 1997 Jan;33(3):197-89044489
PubMed ID
9044495 View in PubMed
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[Coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction. A superior alternative to thrombolytic therapy?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54803
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Feb 15;92(7):645-6, 648-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-1995

Death outside hospital with special reference to heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55735
Source
Eur Heart J. 1984 Apr;5(4):266-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1984
Author
B. Wennerblom
S. Holmberg
Source
Eur Heart J. 1984 Apr;5(4):266-74
Date
Apr-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units
Coronary Disease - mortality
Female
Heart Diseases - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mobile Health Units
Mortality
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Resuscitation
Sweden
Abstract
For one year (1 September 1975-31 August 1976) an analysis was made of all deaths occurring outside hospital in the Gothenburg area (population 480 000). The total number of deaths was 1309. It was found that 675 (52%) of these deaths were caused by ischaemic heart disease (IHD), while 54 (4%) were caused by other heart diseases. The circumstances preceding death were analyzed in 363 cases representing all autopsied subjects under 75 years of age who died from IHD (autopsy rate 95%). Of these, 68% died at home, 4% during transport to hospital, and 4% at work. 214 (59%) of the deaths were witnessed, and in 189 (52%) cases, an ambulance had been called. 111 (52% died within 1 min of the onset of symptoms. 23 subject were in ventricular fibrillation on arrival at hospital. 11 of them were resuscitated, but only 3 were discharged alive. Additionally 12 of the non-autopsied subjects who died from IHD and 11 who died from other heart diseases had been witnessed and an ambulance had been called. In summary, 212 subjects who died outside hospital from heart disease in one year in Gothenburg died witnessed, and an ambulance was called. This should be the maximum annual number of cases of cardiac arrest outside hospital which it is possible to reach with a mobile coronary care organization within the time limit for effective resuscitation attempts.
PubMed ID
6734635 View in PubMed
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[Double emergency medical service system in Göteborg]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55045
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(3):82-3, 87
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
L. Ekström
J. Herlitz
S. Holmberg
B. Wennerblom
M. Kihlgren
Author Affiliation
Kardiologdivisionen, Sahlgrenska sjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(3):82-3, 87
Date
1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Care Units
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
English Abstract
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Mobile Health Units - utilization
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Resuscitation
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
During 1989-1991, the mobile coronary care unit (MCCU) in Gothenburg answered 10,908 calls. The most frequent cause of alarm calls was chest pain (21 per cent), whereas cardiac arrest accounted for 9 and surgical cases for 15 per cent. Severe pain was most frequent among patients with chest or abdominal pain. Despite the high frequency of chest pain, only a third of the myocardial infarction cases were attended by the MCCU. Of all cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where resuscitation was attempted, 26 per cent were alive at admission to hospital, and 10 per cent at discharge, as compared with 48 and 22 per cent, respectively, among the subgroup with bystander-witnessed cardiac arrest and ventricular fibrillation as an initial finding.
PubMed ID
8455977 View in PubMed
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Effect of a media campaign on delay times and ambulance use in suspected acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55409
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1989 Jul 1;64(1):90-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1989

Effect of bystander initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ventricular fibrillation and survival after witnessed cardiac arrest outside hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54852
Source
Br Heart J. 1994 Nov;72(5):408-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
B. Wennerblom
A. Axelsson
A. Bång
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Br Heart J. 1994 Nov;72(5):408-12
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Brain Ischemia - prevention & control
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - mortality
Comparative Study
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - prevention & control
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To describe the proportion of patients who were discharged from hospital after witnessed cardiac arrest outside hospital in relation to whether a bystander initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PATIENTS--All patients with witnessed cardiac arrest outside hospital before arrival of the ambulance and in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted by the emergency medical service in Gothenburg during 1980-92. RESULTS--Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated by a bystander in 18% (303) of 1,660 cases. In this group 69% had ventricular fibrillation at first recording compared with 51% in the remaining patients (P
PubMed ID
7818956 View in PubMed
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Follow-up of a 1-year media campaign on delay times and ambulance use in suspected acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55172
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 Feb;13(2):171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
J. Herlitz
M. Blohm
M. Hartford
B W Karlson
R. Luepker
S. Holmberg
M. Risenfors
B. Wennerblom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine I, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1992 Feb;13(2):171-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulances - utilization
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In order to reduce the delay times from onset of symptoms to arrival in hospital, and increase the use of ambulance in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI), a media campaign was initiated in an urban area. An initial 3-week intense campaign was followed by a maintenance phase of 1 year. Delay times and ambulance use during the campaign were compared with the previous 21 months. Among patients admitted to a coronary care unit (CCU) due to suspected AMI, the median delay time was reduced from 3 h to 2 h 40 min and the mean delay time was reduced from 11 h 33 min to 7 h 42 min (P less than 0.001). Among patients with confirmed AMI the median delay time was reduced from 3 h to 2 h 20 min and the mean delay time from 10 h to 6 h 27 min (P less than 0.001). We conclude that a 1-year media campaign can reduce delay times in suspected AMI, and that this effect appears to continue at 1 year, but ambulance use seems to be more difficult to influence.
PubMed ID
1555612 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.