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6 records – page 1 of 1.

An unusual manifestation of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection: meningitis, hepatitis, iritis and atypical erythema nodosum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56843
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(2):259-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
B. Sundelöf
H. Gnarpe
J. Gnarpe
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Gävle Central Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(2):259-61
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis
Chlamydophila pneumoniae
Erythema Nodosum - microbiology
Hepatitis - microbiology
Humans
Iritis - microbiology
Male
Meningitis, Aseptic - microbiology
Sweden
Abstract
A 37-year-old man was admitted to hospital with fever, muscle tenderness, headache and mild exanthema on the right thigh. During his hospital stay, the headache worsened and aseptic meningitis was diagnosed. A bilateral iritis developed, and the exanthema developed into an atypical erythema nodosum. In liver function tests, pathological results were recorded. Vasculitis was suspected but could not be confirmed. All serological tests proved negative except for a fourfold titre rise to Chlamydia pneumoniae. We concluded that the meningitis, hepatitis, iritis and atypical erythema nodosum were most probably due to a C. pneumoniae infection.
PubMed ID
8511521 View in PubMed
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Chlamydia pneumoniae in Swedish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222285
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(4):429-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
B. Sundelöf
J. Gnarpe
H. Gnarpe
L. Grillner
S. Darougar
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Gävle Central Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1993;25(4):429-33
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Chlamydia Infections - enzymology - epidemiology - immunology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - enzymology - epidemiology - immunology
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Chlamydia pneumoniae infections have earlier been described as mycoplasma-like illnesses in young people, and also appear to be associated with community-acquired pneumonia in adults. In this retrospective study, 12.2% (23/188) of patients with pneumonia who required hospitalization during the 3 years 1985-87 had serological evidence of recent C. pneumoniae infection. Many of these patients had symptoms similar to ornithosis. The most interesting finding was that half of the patients with a 4-fold IgG antibody titre rise to C. pneumoniae also had an increased alkaline phosphatase concentration.
PubMed ID
8248741 View in PubMed
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[Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR)--a common cause of respiratory tract infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226204
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Jun 5;88(23):2143-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1991

Prevalence of hospital-associated infections in five Swedish hospitals in November 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249110
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1978;10(1):66-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
S. Bernander
A. Hambraeus
K E Myrbäck
B. Nyström
B. Sundelöf
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1978;10(1):66-70
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Chronic Disease
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Sweden
Abstract
The prevalence rate of hospital-associated infections in 5 Swedish hospitals on November 4, 1975 is reported. In all, 4246 patients were included in the study, 3657 in acute disease clinics and 589 in chronic disease clinics. The overall prevalence rate was 17%, 11% in acute disease clinics and 59% in chronic disease clinics. The highest rate was found in intensive care units (72%), while in ophthalmological units it was 1%. 50% of all hospital-associated infections were urinary tract infections, 68% of which occurred in patients with an indwelling urinary catheter. 25% of all infections in acute disease clinics were postoperative wound infections, and 20% in chronic disease clinics were skin infections, including infections in varicose and decubital ulcers. 58% of the bacterial isolates from hospital-associated infections were gram-negative rods, while 12% were Staphylococcus aureus. Also in postoperative wound infections the gram-negative rods dominated over Staph. aureus, 35 vs. 23%. A prevalence study of this order of size seems adequate to assess the overall rate of hospital-associated infections in Sweden as compared to other countries. However, differences in prevalence rates between hospitals and clinics should be interpreted with great care. The seriousness and effect of reported infections must be evaluated otherwise, as well as the day-to-day infection control and the evaluation of prophylactic measures need other methods.
PubMed ID
635478 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of specific antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR) in Swedish orienteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222874
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 24;340(8826):1047-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-1992

Randomised trial of 23-valent pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine in prevention of pneumonia in middle-aged and elderly people. Swedish Pneumococcal Vaccination Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57587
Source
Lancet. 1998 Feb 7;351(9100):399-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1998
Author
A. Ortqvist
J. Hedlund
L A Burman
E. Elbel
M. Höfer
M. Leinonen
I. Lindblad
B. Sundelöf
M. Kalin
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Sweden. ake.ortqvist@inf.ds.sll.se
Source
Lancet. 1998 Feb 7;351(9100):399-403
Date
Feb-7-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Vaccines
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Pneumonia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - epidemiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Vaccination
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We assessed the effectiveness of a 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine in the prevention of pneumococcal pneumonia and of pneumonia overall in non-immunocompromised middle-aged and elderly people. METHODS: The prospective, multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial was carried out across departments of infectious diseases at six tertiary-care or university hospitals in Sweden. 691 non-immunocompromised patients aged 50-85 years who had been treated as inpatients for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were randomly assigned either 23-valent pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine or placebo (sodium chloride). We used Cox regression models to estimate the relative risks of pneumonia overall and pneumococcal pneumonia for the placebo group compared with the vaccine group. FINDINGS: 63 (19%) of 339 patients in the vaccine group and 57 (16%) of 352 patients in the placebo group developed a new pneumonia, corresponding to a relative risk over time for the placebo group compared with the vaccine group of 0.83 (95% CI 0.58-1.12, p=0.31). Pneumococcal pneumonia was diagnosed in 16 (4.5%) patients in the placebo group and in 19 (5.6%) in the vaccine group, corresponding to a relative risk for the placebo group of 0.78 (95% CI 0.40-1.51, p=0.45). We found no difference in the death rate between the two study groups. INTERPRETATION: The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine did not prevent pneumonia overall or pneumococcal pneumonia in middle-aged and elderly individuals.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1998 Apr 25;351(9111):1283-4; author reply 1284-59643767
Comment In: Lancet. 1998 Apr 25;351(9111):1283; author reply 1284-59643766
Comment In: Lancet. 1998 Apr 25;351(9111):1284-59643769
Comment In: Lancet. 1998 Apr 25;351(9111):1284; author reply 1284-59643768
Comment In: Lancet. 1998 Jun 27;351(9120):1961; author reply 19629654289
PubMed ID
9482293 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.