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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Coping in dieting and eating disorders: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32767
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2000 May;188(5):273-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
A. Ghaderi
B. Scott
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2000 May;188(5):273-9
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diet, Reducing - adverse effects - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Eating Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Models, Psychological
Problem Solving
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Social Support
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The use of different coping strategies, measured by the Ways of Coping Questionnaire was investigated among 1157 women (18 to 30 years), randomly selected from the general population of Sweden as part of a longitudinal study. Subjects were clustered into five groups: subjects with past or current eating disorders (ED), and subjects with no ED but with past, current, or no history of dieting. Subjects with past or current ED reported significantly higher levels of escape avoidance and lower levels of seeking social support and purposeful problem solving compared with subjects with neither ED nor dieting. These group comparisons were then reanalyzed with sum of depressive symptoms as a covariate in covariate analyses. The only significant difference between the groups concerned the use of escape avoidance. The significant differences in the use of escape-avoidance strategies may motivate more extensive training in coping in the context of prevention and treatment of ED and maladaptive dieting.
PubMed ID
10830564 View in PubMed
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Epidemic Norwegian scabies in a geriatric unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229500
Source
Age Ageing. 1990 Mar;19(2):125-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
A H Hopper
J. Salisbury
A N Jegadeva
B. Scott
G C Bennett
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Medicine, London Hospital.
Source
Age Ageing. 1990 Mar;19(2):125-7
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross Infection - transmission
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Hospital Units
Humans
Norway
Occupational Diseases - parasitology
Recurrence
Scabies - transmission
Abstract
Norwegian scabies is highly contagious and presents with a psoriasiform dermatosis. It afflicts particularly the elderly and patients with immunosuppression. Two weeks after the admission of an index case of Norwegian scabies to a geriatric ward, 13 and 25 patients and 6 of 18 ward nurses developed scabies. Despite comprehensive treatment, the ward epidemic recurred 6 weeks later probably as a result of inadequate treatment of the index case. This diagnosis should be considered when patients from high-risk groups present with an undiagnosed rash.
PubMed ID
2337008 View in PubMed
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Genetic susceptibility to MS: a second stage analysis in Canadian MS families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193481
Source
Neurogenetics. 2001 Jul;3(3):145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
D A Dyment
C J Willer
B. Scott
H. Armstrong
A. Ligers
J. Hillert
D W Paty
S. Hashimoto
V. Devonshire
J. Hooge
L. Kastrukoff
J. Oger
L. Metz
S. Warren
W. Hader
C. Power
A. Auty
A. Nath
R. Nelson
M. Freedman
D. Brunet
J E Paulseth
G. Rice
P. O'Connor
P. Duquette
Y. Lapierre
G. Francis
J P Bouchard
T J Murray
V. Bhan
C. Maxner
W. Pryse-Phillips
M. Stefanelli
A D Sadovnick
N. Risch
G C Ebers
Author Affiliation
The Wellcome Trust Center for Human Genetics, Oxford, UK.
Source
Neurogenetics. 2001 Jul;3(3):145-51
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family
Female
Genetic Linkage
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genome, Human
HLA-DR Antigens - genetics
HLA-DRB1 Chains
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - genetics
Nuclear Family
Software
Abstract
Four published genome screens have identified a number of markers with increased sharing in multiple sclerosis (MS) families, although none has reached statistical significance. One hundred and five markers previously identified as showing increased sharing in Canadian, British, Finnish, and American genome screens were genotyped in 219 sibling pairs ascertained from the database of the Canadian Collaborative Project on Genetic Susceptibility to MS (CCPGSMS). No markers examined met criteria for significant linkage. Markers located at 5p14 and 17q22 were analyzed in a total of 333 sibling pairs and attained mlod scores of 2.27 and 1.14, respectively. The known HLA Class II DRB1 association with MS was confirmed (P
PubMed ID
11523565 View in PubMed
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Impact of Climate Change on the Small Mammal Community of the Yukon Boreal Forest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299425
Source
Integr Zool. 2019 Apr 14; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-14-2019
Author
Charles J Krebs
Rudy Boonstra
B Scott Gilbert
Alice J Kenney
Stan Boutin
Author Affiliation
Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Blvd., Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z4 Canada.
Source
Integr Zool. 2019 Apr 14; :
Date
Apr-14-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Long-term monitoring is critical to determine stability and sustainability of wildlife populations, and if change has occurred, why. We have followed population density changes in the small mammal community in the boreal forest of the southern Yukon for 46 years with density estimates by live trapping on 3-5 unmanipulated grids in spring and autumn. This community consists of 10 species and was responsible for 9% of the energy flow in the herbivore component of this ecosystem from 1986-96, but this increased to 38% from 2003-2014. Small mammals, although small in size, are large in the transfer of energy from plants to predators and decomposers. Four species form the bulk of the biomass. There was shift in the dominant species from the 1970s to the 2000s, with Myodes rutilus increasing in relative abundance by 22% and Peromyscus maniculatus decreasing by 22%. From 2007 to 2018 Myodes comprised 63% of the catch, Peromyscus 20%, and Microtus species 17%. Possible causes of these changes involve climate change which is increasing primary production in this boreal forest and an associated increase in the abundance of three rodent predators, marten (Martes americana), ermine (Mustela erminea), and coyotes (Canis latrans). Following and understanding these and potential future changes will require long-term monitoring studies on a large scale to measure metapopulation dynamics. The small mammal community in northern Canada is being affected by climate change and cannot remain stable. Changes will be critically dependent on food-web interactions that are species specific. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
PubMed ID
30983064 View in PubMed
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Measuring the negative mood component of stress experiences: description and psychometric properties of a short adjective check-list of stress responses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46119
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2001 Feb;42(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
B. Scott
M. Brandberg
A. Ohman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Sweden. berit.scott@psyk.uu.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2001 Feb;42(1):1-7
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychological Tests
Reproducibility of Results
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Negative Mood (NM) is a 19-items adjective check-list developed to assess negative mood and stress responses. The items of the scale reflect dimensions such as depressed mood, anxiety, anger and time urgency. The data were collected from four different samples, two random population samples and two smaller selective samples. The psychometric properties of the NM showed high internal consistency (Cronbach's Alpha). When analysed with principal components analysis, three factors emerged, anxiety/depression, time pressure, and anger. The factors emerged in all four samples, within samples and between gender. The NM factors were tested for convergent and discriminative validity by correlating them with other more established measures of different aspects of negative mood. The results showed high convergent and discriminative validity for two of the NM factors, i.e., anxiety/depression, and anger, whereas the results for the third factor, time pressure, were more ambiguous. This scale has proven to be useful in capturing some vital dimensions of negative affect across different kinds of populations.
PubMed ID
11273574 View in PubMed
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Predictors of tinnitus discomfort, adaptation and subjective loudness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46679
Source
Br J Audiol. 1990 Feb;24(1):51-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
B. Scott
P. Lindberg
L. Melin
L. Lyttkens
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Br J Audiol. 1990 Feb;24(1):51-62
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Female
Humans
Loudness Perception
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Tinnitus - pathology - psychology
Abstract
In a nation-wide investigation, covering all the hearing centres in Sweden, a study was made of adaptation processes, subjective discomfort from tinnitus, subjective loudness of tinnitus and psychological complaints in 3372 subjects by means of a questionnaire. The most important predictors of discomfort from and adaptation to tinnitus were found to be the controllability and the degree of maskability by external sounds, i.e. the subject's coping abilities or internal-external locus of control. Increased control and masking effects from the environment imply a decrease in discomfort and better adaptation. The most important predictor of worsened subjective loudness of tinnitus was the duration of the tinnitus. That is, subjects who had had tinnitus for a longer time perceived the loudness as more intense. The psychosomatic factors which most strongly predicted increased discomfort from and decreased tolerance to tinnitus were depression and insomnia. These findings have theoretical and practical implications for the management and treatment of tinnitus.
PubMed ID
2317601 View in PubMed
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A re-evaluation of the impact of radiographic orientation on the identification and interpretation of Harris lines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265941
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2015 Jan;156(1):141-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Amy B Scott
Robert D Hoppa
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2015 Jan;156(1):141-7
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Physical - methods - standards
Denmark
Humans
Radius - anatomy & histology - radiography
Tibia - anatomy & histology - radiography
Abstract
The identification of Harris lines through radiographic analysis has been well-established since their discovery in the late nineteenth century. Most commonly associated with stress, the study of Harris lines has been fraught with inconsistent identification standards, high levels of intra- and interobserver error, and the inevitability of skeletal remodelling. Despite these methodological challenges, the use of Harris lines remains an important contributor to studies of health in archaeological populations. This research explores the radiographic process, specifically orientation and how Harris lines are initially captured for study. Using the Black Friars (13th-mid 17th centuries) skeletal sample from Denmark, 157 individuals (134 adults; 23 subadults) were radiographically analyzed in both an anterior-posterior (A-P) and medial-lateral (M-L) view for the left and right radii and tibiae. Based on the current methodological standards within the literature, it was hypothesized that the A-P view would provide the best resolution and visualization of Harris lines. The results, however, show that the number of lines visible in the M-L view were significantly higher than those visible in the A-P view; inferring that the M-L view is superior for the study of Harris lines.
PubMed ID
25303638 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.