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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1975 Apr 14;137(16):913-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-1975

[Frequency and follow-up of non-negative cervical smears in the counties of Storstrøm, Vestsjaelland and Bornholm in 1979-1989]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24148
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 25;155(4):240-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-25-1993
Author
E. Lynge
P. Poll
J. Larsen
H B Schultz
N. Thommesen
Author Affiliation
Kraeftens Bekaempelse, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Jan 25;155(4):240-5
Date
Jan-25-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cervix Uteri - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Registries
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
The outcome of the cervical cancer screening in Storstrøm, West Zeeland and Bornholm counties in 1979-1989 was evaluated. About 6% of the screened women had at least one non-negative smear requiring further follow-up. 2% were women with positive smears. Only 3/4 of women with positive smears were followed up within the first three months after the positive smear. Late follow-up probably resulted in a few cases of invasive cervical cancer. The computerized pathology registration system permits automatic monitoring of women with positive smears, and it is suggested that these facilities should be used systematically.
PubMed ID
8430472 View in PubMed
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[Hidden camera. Interview by Mogens Cuber.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37174
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1991 Apr 24;91(17):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-1991

Implications of the distribution of Albumin Naskapi and Albumin Mexico for new world prehistory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199131
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2000 Apr;111(4):557-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
D G Smith
J. Lorenz
B K Rolfs
R L Bettinger
B. Green
J. Eshleman
B. Schultz
R. Malhi
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA. dgsmith@ucdavis.edu
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2000 Apr;111(4):557-72
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Albumins - genetics
Anthropology
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Genetic Variation
Genetics, Population
Humans
Indians, North American
Abstract
The known distributions of two mutational variants of the albumin gene that are restricted to Mexico and/or North America, Albumin Mexico (AL*Mexico) and Albumin Naskapi (AL*Naskapi), were expanded by the electrophoretic analysis of sera collected from more than 3, 500 Native Americans representing several dozen tribal groups. With a few exceptions that could be due to recent, isolated cases of admixture, AL*Naskapi is limited to groups that speak Athapaskan and Algonquian, two widely distributed language families not thought to be related, and to several linguistically unrelated groups geographically proximate to its probable ancestral homeland. Similarly, AL*Mexico is limited to groups that speak Yuman or Uto-Aztecan, two language groups in the American Southwest and Baja California not thought to be closely related to each other, and to several linguistically unrelated groups throughout Mexico. The simultaneous consideration of genetic, historical, linguistic, and archaeological evidence suggests that AL*Naskapi probably originated on the northwestern coast of North America, perhaps in some group ancestral to both Athapaskans and Algonquians, and then spread by migration and admixture to contiguous unrelated, or distantly related, tribal groups. AL*Mexico probably originated in Mexico before 3,000 years BP then spread northward along the Tepiman corridor together with cultural influences to several unrelated groups that participated in the Hohokam culture.
PubMed ID
10727973 View in PubMed
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Meningeal involvement in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: symptoms, incidence, risk factors and treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26547
Source
Scand J Haematol. 1985 Nov;35(5):487-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985
Author
J. Ersbøll
H B Schultz
B L Thomsen
N. Keiding
N I Nissen
Source
Scand J Haematol. 1985 Nov;35(5):487-96
Date
Nov-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Combined Modality Therapy
Denmark
Female
Humans
Lymphoma - drug therapy - pathology - radiotherapy
Male
Meningeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
Meningeal involvement (MI) by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) was seen in 38/602 patients (6.3%). In relation to histologic subtype the frequency of MI was: Follicular small cleaved and mixed cell 2/128 (1.6%), small lymphocytic and diffuse small cleaved cell 2/83 (2.4%), large cell and immunoblastic 13/295 (4.5%), small noncleaved cell 6/31 (19%), lymphoblastic 15/66 (23%). Risk factors that predict for MI were, besides histologic subtype, age under 40 yr, clinical stage IV, site of involvement (bone marrow, bone, skin gastrointestinal tract), and a poor response to initial therapy. In a Cox multivariate model encompassing the intermediate and high grade malignancy groups of the Working Formulation (WF), the 3 most important risk factors were histology, age, and stage. The estimated 1-yr probability of MI for combinations of the 3 risk factors was: 3 risk factors (61%), 2 risk factors (15-28%), 1 risk factor (4-8%), 0 risk factor (1.5%). At the diagnosis of MI, 84% of the patients had evidence of advanced systemic NHL, and the median survival after MI was 10 wk. CNS prophylaxis with whole-brain irradiation and intrathecal chemotherapy can only be recommended in patients with 2 or 3 risk factors. Improvement of the systemic chemotherapy might be the most important factor for prevention of MI in NHL.
PubMed ID
4089528 View in PubMed
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Microbial mercury methylation in Antarctic sea ice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276476
Source
Nat Microbiol. 2016;1(10):16127
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Caitlin M Gionfriddo
Michael T Tate
Ryan R Wick
Mark B Schultz
Adam Zemla
Michael P Thelen
Robyn Schofield
David P Krabbenhoft
Kathryn E Holt
John W Moreau
Source
Nat Microbiol. 2016;1(10):16127
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Atmospheric deposition of mercury onto sea ice and circumpolar sea water provides mercury for microbial methylation, and contributes to the bioaccumulation of the potent neurotoxin methylmercury in the marine food web. Little is known about the abiotic and biotic controls on microbial mercury methylation in polar marine systems. However, mercury methylation is known to occur alongside photochemical and microbial mercury reduction and subsequent volatilization. Here, we combine mercury speciation measurements of total and methylated mercury with metagenomic analysis of whole-community microbial DNA from Antarctic snow, brine, sea ice and sea water to elucidate potential microbially mediated mercury methylation and volatilization pathways in polar marine environments. Our results identify the marine microaerophilic bacterium Nitrospina as a potential mercury methylator within sea ice. Anaerobic bacteria known to methylate mercury were notably absent from sea-ice metagenomes. We propose that Antarctic sea ice can harbour a microbial source of methylmercury in the Southern Ocean.
PubMed ID
27670112 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.