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Athletes' Expectations About Sport-Injury Rehabilitation: A Cross-Cultural Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284168
Source
J Sport Rehabil. 2016 Dec;25(4):338-347
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Monna Arvinen-Barrow
Damien Clement
Jennifer Jordan Hamson-Utley
Cindra Kamphoff
Rebecca Zakrajsek
Sae-Mi Lee
Brian Hemmings
Taru Lintunen
Scott B Martin
Source
J Sport Rehabil. 2016 Dec;25(4):338-347
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Athletes - psychology
Athletic Injuries - psychology - rehabilitation
Attitude to Health
Child
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Self Report
United Kingdom
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Athletes enter injury rehabilitation with certain expectations about the recovery process, outcomes, and the professional providing treatment. Their expectations influence the effectiveness of the assistance received and affect the overall rehabilitation process. Expectations may vary depending on numerous factors such as sport experience, gender, sport type, and cultural background. Unfortunately, limited information is available on athletes' expectations about sport-injury rehabilitation.
To examine possible differences in athletes' expectations about sport-injury rehabilitation based on their country of residence and type of sport (contact vs noncontact).
Cross-sectional.
Recreational, college, and professional athletes from the US, UK, and Finland were surveyed.
Of the 1209 athletes ranging from 12 to 80 y of age (mean 23.46 ± 7.91), 529 US [80%], 253 UK [86%], and 199 Finnish [82%] athletes provided details of their geographical location and were included in the final analyses.
The Expectations About Athletic Training (EAAT) questionnaire was used to determine athletes' expectations about personal commitment, facilitative conditions, and the expertise of the sports-medicine professional (SMP).
A 3 × 2 MANCOVA revealed significant main effects for country (P = .0001, ?p(2) = .055) and sport type (P = .0001, ?p(2) = .023). Specifically, US athletes were found to have higher expectations of personal commitment and facilitative conditions than their UK and Finnish counterparts. Athletes participating in contact sports had higher expectations of facilitative conditions and the expertise of the SMP than did athletes participating in noncontact sports.
SMPs, especially those in the US, should consider the sport and environment when providing services. In addition, SMPs need to highlight and demonstrate their expertise during the rehabilitation process, especially for those who compete in contact sports.
PubMed ID
27632833 View in PubMed
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Athletes' use of mental skills during sport injury rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271826
Source
J Sport Rehabil. 2015 May;24(2):189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Monna Arvinen-Barrow
Damien Clement
Jennifer J Hamson-Utley
Rebecca A Zakrajsek
Sae-Mi Lee
Cindra Kamphoff
Taru Lintunen
Brian Hemmings
Scott B Martin
Source
J Sport Rehabil. 2015 May;24(2):189-97
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletes - psychology
Athletic Injuries - rehabilitation
Child
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Existing theoretical frameworks and empirical research support the applicability and usefulness of integrating mental skills throughout sport injury rehabilitation.
To determine what, if any, mental skills athletes use during injury rehabilitation, and by who these skills were taught. Cross-cultural differences were also examined.
Cross-sectional design.
College athletes from 5 universities in the United States and a mixture of collegiate, professional, and recreational club athletes from the United Kingdom and Finland were recruited for this study.
A total of 1283 athletes from the United States, United Kingdom, and Finland, who participated in diverse sports at varying competitive levels took part in this study.
As part of a larger study on athletes' expectations of injury rehabilitation, participants were asked a series of open-ended and closed-ended questions concerning their use of mental skills during injury rehabilitation.
Over half (64.0%) of the sample reported previous experience with athletic training, while 27.0% indicated that they used mental skills during injury rehabilitation. The top 3 mental skills reported were goal setting, positive self-talk/positive thoughts, and imagery. Of those athletes that used mental skills, 71.6% indicated that they felt mental skills helped them to rehabilitate faster. A greater proportion of athletes from the United States (33.4%) reported that they used mental skills during rehabilitation compared with athletes from the United Kingdom (23.4%) and Finland (20.3%). A small portion (27.6%) of the participants indicated that their sports medicine professional had taught them how to use mental skills; only 3% were taught mental skills by a sport psychologist.
The low number of athletes who reported using mental skills during rehabilitation is discouraging, but not surprising given research findings that mental skills are underutilized by injured athletes in the 3 countries examined. More effort should be focused on educating and training athletes, coaches, and sports medicine professionals on the effectiveness of mental training in the injury rehabilitation context.
PubMed ID
25558960 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of pregnant women, utilization, and satisfaction with prenatal services in St. Petersburg, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213789
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1995 Dec;12(6):374-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
L I Dennis
B C Flynn
J B Martin
Author Affiliation
Health of the Community, School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis, USA.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1995 Dec;12(6):374-7
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Questionnaires
Russia
Social Support
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A descriptive study with a convenience sample of 47 subjects drawn from two birthing houses was conducted in St. Petersburg, Russia, under the auspices of the World Health Organization Healthy Cities Project. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire given to women in birthing houses after delivery and prior to discharge. Subjects ranged in age from 16 to 38 years. Sixty-one percent of women began prenatal care within the 1st trimester, 35% within the 2nd trimester, and 2% received no prenatal care. Younger women were more likely than older women to start prenatal care in the 1st trimester, but received less teaching by health care providers. Younger women also expressed more stress and need for counseling. In addition, 83% of low-birthweight babies were born to younger women. These findings indicate a focus by health care personnel on older pregnant women, although younger pregnant women were at higher risk for poor pregnancy outcome. The strongest statistically significant correlations were found among the patient satisfaction variables, indicating that satisfaction with prenatal services may influence when women begin prenatal care services.
PubMed ID
8545304 View in PubMed
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Do drug warnings and market withdrawals have an impact on the number of calls to teratogen information services?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127479
Source
Pharmacopsychiatry. 2012 Jun;45(4):146-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
O. Sheehy
M-P Gendron
B. Martin
A. Bérard
Author Affiliation
Research Center, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Pharmacopsychiatry. 2012 Jun;45(4):146-51
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Canada
Female
Humans
Lactation
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - chemically induced - epidemiology
Product Recalls and Withdrawals - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Teratogens - pharmacology
Young Adult
Abstract
IMAGe provides information on risks and benefits of medication use during pregnancy and lactation.
The aim of this study was to determine the impact of Health Canada warnings on the number of calls received at IMAGe.
We analyzed calls received between January 2003 and March 2008. The impact of the following warning/withdrawal were studied: paroxetine and risk of cardiac malformations (09/29/2005), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) (03/10/2006), and impact of rofecoxib market withdrawal (09/30/2004). Interrupted auto-regressive integrated -moving average (ARIMA) analyses were used to test the impact of each warning on the number of calls received to IMAGe.
61,505 calls were analyzed. The paroxetine warning had a temporary impact increasing the overall number of calls to IMAGe, and an abrupt permanent effect on the number of calls related to antidepressant exposures. The PPHN warning had no impact but we observed a significant increase in the number of calls following rofecoxib market withdrawal.
Health Canada needs to consider the increase in the demand of information to IMAGe following warnings on the risk of medication use during pregnancy.
PubMed ID
22290204 View in PubMed
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Food consumption, obesity and abnormal glycaemic control in a Canadian Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261264
Source
Clin Obes. 2014 Dec;4(6):316-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
J. Singer
C. Putulik Kidlapik
B. Martin
H J Dean
E. Trepman
J M Embil
Source
Clin Obes. 2014 Dec;4(6):316-23
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Dietary and lifestyle factors may contribute to diabetes and obesity in the Canadian Inuit. We documented dietary patterns, physical activity level, obesity, blood glucose abnormalities and diabetes prevalence in a Canadian Inuit community. There were 250 Inuit residents of Repulse Bay, Nunavut, who had an interview about diet and physical activity, measurement of weight and height, and laboratory studies (194 subjects). Children, adolescents and younger adults (aged?
PubMed ID
25826161 View in PubMed
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Investigation and management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in Canadian Inuit: enhancing access to care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4093
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:117-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B. Martin
W. Smith
P. Orr
F. Guijon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995;54 Suppl 1:117-21
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic regions - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma in Situ - ethnology - prevention & control
Colposcopy
Delivery of Health Care
Electrosurgery
Female
Humans
Inuits
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is a major cause of morbidity among Circumpolar women. Cervical cancer comprised 15% of all cancers in Canadian Inuit women from 1969-1988. The age standardized incidence for invasive cervical cancer in Canadian Inuit women is 3.1 times the rate in the general Canadian population. Management of CIN in women of remote Arctic regions has traditionally required multiple visits to specialized medical centres for diagnosis, therapy and follow-up. Such centralized care requires separation of women from their families, resulting in significant medical, emotional and economic costs for the patient, her family and community. In the Canadian Central Arctic, a program for the diagnosis and therapy of CIN has been established using colposcopy with loop electrosurgery, performed by a trained local family practitioner and visiting gynecologist. Early program evaluation has indicated reduction in medical expenditures due to travel costs, minimal procedure-related morbidity and discomfort, and improved patient satisfaction associated with reduced separation from family and community. It is hoped that the program design, which harnesses technology in order to provide improved care closer to home, will be applicable to other Circumpolar regions.
PubMed ID
7639897 View in PubMed
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Investigation of Fire at Council, Alaska: A Release of Approximately 3000 Curies of Tritium.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301209
Source
Pacific Northwest Laboratory Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute. PNL-6523.
Publication Type
Report
Date
April 1988
Investigation of Fire at Council, Alaska: A Release of Approximately 3000 Curies of Tritium G. A. Jensen J. B. Martin April1988 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DEĀ·AC06-76RLO 1830 Pacific Northwest Laboratory Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by
  1 document  
Author
G. A. Jensen
J. B. Martin
Source
Pacific Northwest Laboratory Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute. PNL-6523.
Date
April 1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3438007
Keywords
Council, Alaska
Tritium
Thermal radiation
Humans
Plants
Environmental Exposure
Lighting systems
Abstract
On September 6, 1987, about 6:00 a.m., a fire was discovered in the community building at Council, Alaska, where 12 radioluminescent (RL) light panels containing approximately 3000 Ci were stored. All of the tritium in the panels was released as a result of the fire. This report summarizes the recovery of the remains of the panels destroyed in the fire and investigations completed to evaluate the fire site for possible exposure of community residents or contamination by tritium release in the environment. Based on the analysis of urine samples obtained from individuals in the community and from Pacific Northwest Laboratory personnel participating in the recovery operation, no evidence of exposure to individuals was found. No tritium (above normal background) was found in water and vegetation samples obtained at various locations near the site.
Notes
Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE·AC06-76RLO 1830.
Documents
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Outcome of the first 3-years of a DNA-based neonatal screening program for glutaric acidemia type 1 in Manitoba and northwestern Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191686
Source
Mol Genet Metab. 2002 Jan;75(1):70-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
C R Greenberg
A N Prasad
L A Dilling
J R G Thompson
J C Haworth
B. Martin
P. Wood-Steiman
L E Seargeant
B. Seifert
F A Booth
C. Prasad
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Health Sciences Centre, Cadham Provincial Laboratory, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R2E 1R9. cgreenberg@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Mol Genet Metab. 2002 Jan;75(1):70-8
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Genetic Testing
Glutarates - blood
Glutaryl-CoA Dehydrogenase
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mutation
Neonatal Screening
Oxidoreductases - deficiency - genetics
Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors
Abstract
Glutaric acidemia type 1 (GA1) is overrepresented in the aboriginal population of Island Lake, Manitoba, and northwestern Ontario who speak the Ojibway-Cree (Oji-Cree) dialect. The carrier frequency in these communities has been predicted to be as high as 1 in 10 individuals. Prior to beginning newborn screening for GA1 in May 1998, 18 of 20 affected patients diagnosed at this center have been from these high-risk communities. Most have followed an acute encephalopathic course with permanent neurologic sequelae and high mortality. They excrete small amounts of glutaric acid and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid and have significant residual enzyme activity. A single homozygous mutation in glutaryl-CoA-dehydrogenase (GCDH IVS-1 + 5g right arrow t) has been identified in this population. DNA-based newborn screening targeted to our high-risk communities was begun in order to provide presymptomatic detection and treatment of affected patients. Of the first 1176 newborns screened, 4 affected infants were identified and treated with a low-protein diet, carnitine, and riboflavin. All 4 infants have required numerous hospitalizations for treatment of intercurrent illnesses. Eventually, 3 infants presented with acute dystonic encephalopathy and seizures along with permanent neurological sequelae. One of these infants died unexpectedly at home at 18 months of age. The fourth, now 9 months old, has had a gastrostomy tube placed to facilitate fluid replacement in addition to a standard treatment protocol and is doing well. The reasons for our initial disappointing outcomes in the first 3 of 4 affected babies are likely multiple. Based on our early experience and that of other centers screening newborns for GA1, current therapeutic strategies may be insufficient in preventing the occurrence of neurologic sequelae in some children. An incomplete understanding of the neurotoxic mechanisms underlying this devastating disorder hampers effective management.
PubMed ID
11825066 View in PubMed
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Viral hepatitis in a Canadian First Nations community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183198
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2003 Oct;17(10):593-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
G Y Minuk
M. Zhang
S G M Wong
J. Uhanova
C N Bernstein
B. Martin
M R Dawood
L. Vardy
A. Giulvi
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg. gminuk@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2003 Oct;17(10):593-6
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Hepatitis A - epidemiology
Hepatitis B - epidemiology
Hepatitis C - epidemiology
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Prevalence
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Vaccination
Abstract
Serological markers for hepatitis A (HAV), B (HBV) and C (HCV) were documented in 315 inhabitants (27%) of a central Manitoba First Nations community. Serologic evidence of HAV infection (anti-HAV positive) was almost universal (92%) by the age of 20 years. HBV infection (antibody to hepatitis B core antigen positive) had occurred in only 2.3% of the study population and no chronic carriers were identified. Serological evidence of HCV infection (anti-HCV positive) was documented in 2.2% of the population but ongoing viremia (HCV-RNA positive by polymerase chain reaction) was absent. The results of this study highlight the importance of universal HAV vaccination; likely reflect the efficacy of existing prenatal screening and immunoprophylaxis programs for HBV; and raise the possibility that First Nations peoples have an enhanced ability to spontaneously clear HCV.
PubMed ID
14571297 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.