Skip header and navigation
Did you mean name:"B. kriström"? Also try kriström, or kristrun.

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Effect of growth hormone (GH) during puberty in GH-deficient children: preliminary results from an ongoing randomized trial with different dose regimens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33409
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1999 Feb;88(428):80-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
Author
K. Albertsson Wikland
F. Alm
S. Aronsson
J. Gustafsson
L. Hagenäs
A. Häger
S. Ivarsson
B. Kriström
C. Marcus
C. Moëll
K O Nilsson
M. Ritzén
T. Tuvemo
U. Westgren
O. Westphal
J. Aman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/East, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1999 Feb;88(428):80-4
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Height - drug effects
Child
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Growth Disorders - drug therapy - etiology
Human Growth Hormone - administration & dosage - deficiency
Humans
Male
Puberty - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This paper reports results from an ongoing, randomized, multicentre national trial. The aim is to elucidate whether a dose of growth hormone (GH) of 0.2 IU/kg (0.07 mg/kg), given either as once-daily or twice-daily injections during puberty, is more effective than a once-daily dose of 0.1 IU/kg/day (0.03 mg/kg/day) in improving final height in children with GH deficiency (GHD). The twice-daily regimen comes closer to the spontaneous GH secretion pattern in puberty. Ninety-two children with GHD who had been receiving GH therapy for at least 1 year, and with spontaneous puberty or who were prepubertal and due to be started on replacement therapy to induce puberty, were randomly assigned to receive GH as follows: group A, 0.1 IU/kg/day (0.03 mg/kg/day), administered once daily; group B, 0.2 IU/kg/day (0.07 mg/kg/day), administered once daily; and group C, 0.2 IU/kg/day (0.07 mg/kg/day), divided into two equal injections given at 12-hour intervals. Pubertal height gain was 0.7, 0.7 and 1.3 SDS for groups A, B and C, respectively. The gain in height during puberty was thus most marked in group C. Mean final height, when corrected for parental height, was between 0 and 1 SDS in all treatment groups. All but seven children reached a final height within +/- 2 SD of the general population. There was a wide range of final heights in all three treatment groups. This variation in response suggests the need to individualize treatment in order to achieve an appropriate final height for most individuals.
PubMed ID
10102059 View in PubMed
Less detail

Final height after combined growth hormone and GnRH analogue treatment in adopted girls with early puberty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30062
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Nov;93(11):1456-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
T. Tuvemo
B. Jonsson
J. Gustafsson
K. Albertsson-Wikland
A S Aronson
A. Häger
S. Ivarson
B. Kriström
C. Marcus
K O Nilsson
U. Westgren
O. Westphal
J. Aman
L A Proos
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. torsten.tuvemo@kbh.uu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Nov;93(11):1456-62
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Body Height
Buserelin - therapeutic use
Child
Developing Countries
Female
Growth Hormone - therapeutic use
Humans
Puberty - physiology
Puberty, Precocious - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Girls adopted from developing countries often have early or precocious puberty, requiring treatment with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues. During such treatment, decreased growth velocity is frequent. AIM: To study whether the addition of growth hormone (GH) to GnRH analogue treatment improves final height in girls with early or precocious puberty. METHODS: Forty-six girls with early or precocious puberty (age
PubMed ID
15513572 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prediction of the growth response of short prepubertal children treated with growth hormone. Swedish Paediatric Study Group for GH treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35512
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1995 Jan;84(1):51-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
B. Kriström
J. Karlberg
K. Albertsson-Wikland
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1995 Jan;84(1):51-7
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arginine - diagnostic use
Body Height - drug effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Growth - drug effects
Growth Disorders - blood - drug therapy - physiopathology
Growth Hormone - blood - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - diagnostic use
Male
Predictive value of tests
Puberty
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to identify predictors of the growth response to growth hormone (GH) during the first 2 years of GH treatment, using auxological data and the maximum GH response (GHmax) to provocation tests. The patients were 169 prepubertal short children (27F, 142M), with Gmax values ranging from 0 to 65 mU/l. Their mean age (+/- SD) was 8.3 +/- 2.4 years (range 3-13 years), mean height SDS -3.0 +/- 0.7 (range -1.5 to -6.0 SDS) and mean pretreatment height velocity was normal (+/- 0.0 SDS) (range -1.6 to +0.9 SDS). The increase in height SDS during the first 2 years of GH treatment (0.1 U/kg/day) varied from 0.10 to 3.75 SDS, with younger children having a better growth response. Individual growth responses correlated (p
PubMed ID
7734899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of coeliac disease in Turner syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33117
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Sep;88(9):933-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
S A Ivarsson
A. Carlsson
A. Bredberg
J. Alm
S. Aronsson
J. Gustafsson
L. Hagenäs
A. Häger
B. Kriström
C. Marcus
C. Moëll
K O Nilsson
T. Tuvemo
O. Westphal
K. Albertsson-Wikland
J. Aman
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Lund, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1999 Sep;88(9):933-6
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic - blood
Case-Control Studies
Celiac Disease - blood - complications - epidemiology
Child
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Gliadin - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Turner Syndrome - complications
Abstract
This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of coeliac disease in children and adolescents with Turner syndrome. Eighty-seven children and adolescents with Turner syndrome were screened for IgA-antiendomysium antibodies (EMA) and IgA-antigliadin antibodies (AGA), 5% (4/87) being found to be EMA-positive, and 15% (13/87) to have AGA levels above normal. Of the 10 patients who were either AGA- or EMA-positive and further investigated with intestinal biopsy, four manifested villous atrophy (i.e. all three of the EMA-positive patients, but only one of the seven AGA-positive patients). The results suggest EMA-positivity to be a good immunological marker for use in screening for coeliac disease, and such screening to be justified in patients with Turner syndrome.
PubMed ID
10519331 View in PubMed
Less detail

Willingness to pay for antihypertensive therapy--further results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221465
Source
J Health Econ. 1993 Apr;12(1):95-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
M. Johannesson
P O Johansson
B. Kriström
U G Gerdtham
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
Source
J Health Econ. 1993 Apr;12(1):95-108
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Fees, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Financing, Personal - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Hypertension - economics - therapy
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Volition
Abstract
A measurement experiment regarding willingness to pay for antihypertensive therapy is reported. A new type of binary willingness to pay question is used, that allows for different degrees of certainty with respect to the responses. Mean willingness to pay is derived from a simple expected utility model and estimated using maximum likelihood methods. The estimated parameters are highly significant, with predicted signs, and imply a mean willingness to pay of about SEK 800 ($130) per month. The explanatory power of the equation that only includes 'certain' yes/no responses is, as expected, much higher than that of the equation where only 'uncertain' responses are included.
PubMed ID
10126492 View in PubMed
Less detail