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35 records – page 1 of 4.

Adipose tissue cellularity--metabolic aspects. The population study of women in Göteborg 1974-1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48984
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1979;206(6):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
H. Noppa
C. Bengtsson
B. Isaksson
U. Smith
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1979;206(6):501-6
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - cytology - pathology
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body Composition
Cell Count
Coronary Disease - blood - pathology
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - pathology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - blood - pathology
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Risk
Sweden
Uric Acid - blood
Abstract
A representative population sample of middle-aged women was studied in 1974-75. In a subsample, body composition and adipose tissue cellularity variables were determined and individuals with a particular clinical disorder were compared with the total subsample. Women with diabetes mellitus had more body fat and higher fat cell weights and larger fat cell members, whereas these variables did not differ in women with IHD or hypertension compared with the total subsample. Total body fat correlated with arterial BPs, fasting blood glucose, serum lipids and serum uric acid. The correlations were stronger than those reported previously by us between weight index and these variables. In univariate analyses, fat cell weight correlated with systolic BP, serum triglycerides and serum uric acid, and fat cell number with diastolic BP, fasting blood glucose and serum uric acid. In multivariate analyses, when due allowance was made for total body fat, the correlations between these variables and fat cell weight or fat cell number did not reach statistical significance.
PubMed ID
532712 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescription practices, consumption and bacterial resistance in a cross section of Swedish intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188243
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2002 Oct;46(9):1075-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
S M Walther
M. Erlandsson
L G Burman
O. Cars
H. Gill
M. Hoffman
B. Isaksson
G. Kahlmeter
S. Lindgren
L. Nilsson
B. Olsson-Liljequist
H. Hanberger
Author Affiliation
Departments of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Clinical Microbiology and Hygiene and the Pharmacy at Universitetssjukhuset, Linköping, Sweden. sten.walther@lio.se
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2002 Oct;46(9):1075-81
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - microbiology
Data Collection
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Utilization
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this work was to study usage of antibiotics, its possible determinants, and patterns of bacterial resistance in Swedish intensive care units (ICUs).
Prospectively collected data on species and antibiotic resistance of clinical isolates and antibiotic consumption specific to each ICU in 1999 were analyzed together with answers to a questionnaire. Antibiotic usage was measured as defined daily doses per 1000 occupied bed days (DDD1000).
Data were obtained for 38 ICUs providing services to a population of approximately 6 million. The median antibiotic consumption was 1257 DDD1000 (range 584-2415) and correlated with the length of stay but not with the illness severity score or the ICU category. Antibiotic consumption was higher in the ICUs lacking bedside devices for hand disinfection (2193 vs. 1214 DDD1000, p=0.05). In the ICUs with a specialist in infectious diseases responsible for antibiotic treatment the consumption pattern was different only for use of glycopeptides (58% lower usage than in other ICUs: 26 vs. 11 DDD1000,P=0.02). Only 21% of the ICUs had a written guideline on the use of antibiotics, 57% received information on antibiotic usage at least every 3 months and 22% received aggregated resistance data annually. Clinically significant antimicrobial resistance was found among Enterbacter spp. to cephalosporins and among Enterococcus spp. to ampicillin.
Availability of hand disinfection equipment at each bed and a specialist in infectious diseases responsible for antibiotic treatment were factors that correlated with lower antibiotic consumption in Swedish ICUs, whereas patient-related factors were not associated with antibiotic usage.
PubMed ID
12366501 View in PubMed
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Associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy in patients with colorectal liver metastases--Intermediate oncological results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274971
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2016 Apr;42(4):531-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
B. Björnsson
E. Sparrelid
B. Røsok
E. Pomianowska
K. Hasselgren
T. Gasslander
B A Bjørnbeth
B. Isaksson
P. Sandström
Source
Eur J Surg Oncol. 2016 Apr;42(4):531-7
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - surgery
Female
Hepatectomy - methods
Humans
Incidence
Liver Neoplasms - mortality - secondary - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Norway - epidemiology
Portal Vein - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) not amenable for resection have grave prognosis. One limiting factor for surgery is a small future liver remnant (FLR). Early data suggests that associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy (ALPPS) effectively increases the volume of the FLR allowing for resection in a larger fraction of patients than conventional two-stage hepatectomy (TSH) with portal vein occlusion (PVO). Oncological results of the treatment are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the intermediate oncological outcomes after ALPPS in patients with CRLM.
Retrospective analysis of all patients with CRLM operated with ALPPS at the participating centres between December 2012 and May 2014.
Twenty-three patients (16 male, 7 female), age 67 years (28-80) were operated for 6.5 (1-38) metastases of which the largest was 40 mm (14-130). Six (27.3%) patients had extra-hepatic metastases, 16 (72.7%) synchronous presentation. All patients received chemotherapy, 6 cycles (3-25) preoperatively and 16 (70%) postoperatively. Ten patients (43%) were rescue ALPPS after failed PVO. Severe complications occurred in 13.6% and one (4.5%) patient died within 90 days of surgery. After a median follow-up of 22.5 months from surgery and 33.5 months from diagnosis of liver metastases estimated 2 year overall survival was 59% (from surgery) and 73% (from diagnosis). Liver only recurrences (n = 8), were treated with reresection/ablation (n = 7) while lung recurrences were treated with chemotherapy.
The overall survival, rate of severe complications and perioperative mortality associated with ALPPS for patients with CRLM is comparable to TSH.
PubMed ID
26830731 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Aug 13;72(33):3063-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-1975
Author
B. Isaksson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1975 Aug 13;72(33):3063-5
Date
Aug-13-1975
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Sweden
PubMed ID
1165674 View in PubMed
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Body composition in 70-year-old males and females in Gothenburg, Sweden. A population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250394
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1977;611:87-112
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977

Body composition in middle-aged women with special reference to the correlation between body fat mass and anthropometric data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247081
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1979 Jul;32(7):1388-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1979
Author
H. Noppa
M. Andersson
C. Bengtsson
A. Bruce
B. Isaksson
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1979 Jul;32(7):1388-95
Date
Jul-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adult
Aged
Aging
Anthropometry
Body Composition
Body constitution
Body Height
Body Water - analysis
Body Weight
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Potassium - analysis
Radioisotope Dilution Technique
Skinfold thickness
Sweden
Whole-Body Counting
Abstract
A variety of anthropometric measurements was made in a randomized population sample of middle-aged women in five age strata in whom body composition was estimated from total body potassium and total body water determined by whole body counting and isotope dilution technique, respectively. No significant differences with age were found for total body potassium or total body water. A significant age difference was found for body fat mass. Simple linear correlations between anthropometric variables and body fat mass estimates were found to be 0.90, 0.86, 0.77 for body weight, buttock circumference, and sum of triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that these three variables accounted for 80 to 91% of the variation in body fat in the different age strata studied. Multiple regression equations for prediction of body fat from anthropometric variables are given. In about two-thirds of the subjects, the difference between predicted body fat mass and estimated body fat mass was found to be less than +/- 2.5 kg.
PubMed ID
110127 View in PubMed
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Changes in the appearance and treatment of deep sternal infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53739
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2002 Apr;50(4):298-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
A. Tegnell
B. Isaksson
H. Granfeldt
L. Ohman
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Health and Environment, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, S-581 85 Linköping, Sweden. Anders.Tegnell@inf.liu.se
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2002 Apr;50(4):298-303
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Heart Diseases - surgery
Humans
Male
Reoperation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sternum - microbiology
Surgical Wound Infection - drug therapy - pathology - surgery
Sweden
Abstract
The Department of Thoracic Surgery at the University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden, has actively followed up infectious complications of cardiac surgery since 1989. The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes occurred during the 1990s in the appearance and the management of deep infections. This was done by studying patients undergoing surgical revision of infected wounds. We studied 42 patients during 1990-94 and 49 during 1997-98 (total number of operations in these periods, 3075 and 1646, respectively). Pre-operative and intra-operative variables were recorded for the two patient populations. The proportion of cardiac surgery procedures followed by a surgical revision for an infection in the sternal wound increased between the two periods (1.4% vs. 3.0%). Variables associated with the surgical procedures preceding the infection remained unchanged. In the later period, treatment was started earlier (64 vs. 24 days), and the length of antibiotic treatment was decreased (115 vs. 72 days). The incidence of osteomyelitis of the sternal bone was lower (61% vs. 27%). It appears that as the proportion of patients undergoing surgical revision increased, management of the infections became more effective, with aggressive surgical and antibiotic treatment policies and shorter treatment periods. This indicates that in order to evaluate the overall impact of measures designed to reduce infections after cardiac surgery, not only the incidence of infection needs to be followed up but other factors also need to be taken into account.
PubMed ID
12014904 View in PubMed
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Clustering of enterococcal infections in a general intensive care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58372
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2003 Jul;54(3):188-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2003
Author
A. Samuelsson
J. Jonasson
H-J Monstein
S. Berg
B. Isaksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospital, Linköping S-581 85, Sweden. Annika.Samuelsson@lio.se
Source
J Hosp Infect. 2003 Jul;54(3):188-95
Date
Jul-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cluster analysis
Comparative Study
Drug Utilization
Enterococcus
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infection Control - methods
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This is a retrospective study comparing patients' characteristics, antibiotic consumption and environmental contamination before the impact of a new regimen of intensified infection control measures in a general intensive care unit (ICU) at a university-affiliated tertiary-care teaching hospital. The new regimen consisted of (1) reorganization of patient rooms (2) improved hygienic measures including strict hygiene barrier nursing (3) more isolated patient care and (4) more restrictive use of antibiotics. The regimen was introduced after a cluster of enterococcal infections. All patients admitted to the ICU from 1 March 1995 to 28 february 1997 were included. A study period of 12 months after reorganization of the ward was compared with the 12 months immediately before it. The antibiotic consumption, the individual patient's severity of disease (APACHE score), and the extent of therapeutic interventions (TISS score) were recorded. Enterococci were typed biochemically, antibiograms were established and the relation between the isolates was investigated with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The bacteriological results and the patient data suggested a hospital-acquired spread as the cause of the ICU enterococcal outbreak. After implementation of the new regimen, we observed a reduction in the rate of enterococcal bloodstream infections from 3.1 to 1.8%. The consumption of antibiotics fell from 6.11 to 4.24 defined daily doses per patient. The introduction of strict hygiene and barrier nursing, more restrictive use of antibiotics, isolation of infected patients, thorough cleaning and disinfection of the unit was followed by an absence of enterococcal infection clustering and reduction in incidence of enterococcal bacteraemia. We were not able to determine whether the reduction in antibiotic consumption was due to the intervention programme.
PubMed ID
12855233 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.