Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Air pollution, hygiene and health of Danish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41311
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1979 Aug;12(3):251-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1979
Author
B. Holma
G. Kjaer
J. Stokholm
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1979 Aug;12(3):251-86
Date
Aug-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution - analysis
Body Height
Child
Chronic Disease
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Hygiene
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Rural Health
Smoking - complications
Urban health
Abstract
A comprehensive investigation forming part of a joint European study under the auspices of "WHO Long-Term Air Pollution Programme" uses 7-13 year old schoolchildren as the target group. The study has included social, housing, hygienic and epidemic factors as well as family smoking habits. The results indicate that, at exposure to low levels of air pollution, these factors dominate as causes for the impairment of health especially that of respiratory health.
PubMed ID
493955 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Discussion on the environment--the task of the physician]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49502
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1972 Apr 10;134(15):792-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-1972

Housing, hygiene, and health; a study in old residential areas in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42023
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1977 Mar-Apr;32(2):86-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Holma
O. Winding
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1977 Mar-Apr;32(2):86-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Housing - standards
Humans
Hygiene
Income
Infant
Male
Morbidity
Abstract
The effect of 109 social, medical, housing, and hygienic factors on morbidity of 2,096 individuals was studied in 881 apartments in Copenhagen. "Thriving" (satisfaction), followed by "housing standard" and "personal hygiene," turned out to be the most prominent predictor for health. "Thriving of parents" was also important for the health of children. Excluding "thriving" in the analyses, "housing standard" and "personal hygiene" or components of these group factors were the important predictors for the health of the population studied, except for children below 3 years of age. For the health of these, the number of rooms used for sleeping purposes was the best predictor. The only other parameter found to influence the morbidities investigated was the total yearly income of the family, which was found to be a secondary predictor for adult morbidity during the last month of the investigation (March 1973). The analyses applies were Pearson correlation, AID-program, factor and multiple regression analyses.
PubMed ID
849013 View in PubMed
Less detail