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19 records – page 1 of 2.

[Asbestos exposure and asbestos-related lung findings. A cross-sectional study in Telemark].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238661
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1985 Jun 30;105(19-21):1318-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1985

Asbestos-related findings in chest radiographs of the male population of the county of Telemark, Norway--a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236251
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1986 Dec;12(6):567-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
B. Hilt
J T Lien
P G Lund-Larsen
K. Lund
S. Langärd
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1986 Dec;12(6):567-73
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestosis - epidemiology - radiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Mass Screening
Norway
Abstract
In order to investigate the prevalence of asbestos-related diseases, a cross-sectional population study was conducted among 28,216 men aged 40 years in nine municipalities of the county of Telemark, Norway. In a primary radiographic screening 10 X 10-cm chest radiographs were taken of 21,483 persons. In two independent readings of the radiographs, pleural changes were observed in 6.9 and 8.5% of the study subjects. Radiographic findings in the primary screening led to 1,431 subjects being selected for a reexamination. On the basis of occupational histories and 40 X 40-cm chest radiographs, it was concluded that 470 of these subjects (2.2% of the screened population) had radiographic changes consistent with an asbestos-related disorder. Among these, 86 had lung fibrosis (82 in combination with pleural plaques) and 384 had pleural plaques only. There were marked differences in the occurrence of asbestos-related disorders between the seven urban and two rural communities studied, and agreement was observed between the occurrence of such disorders and the degree and duration of the reported asbestos exposure. The study presents evidence that asbestos-related disorders may be more prevalent in the general male population than has been recognized earlier.
PubMed ID
3493527 View in PubMed
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Asbestos-related radiographic changes by ILO classification of 10 x 10 cm chest X-rays in a screening of the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215949
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 1995 Feb;37(2):189-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
B. Hilt
G. Hillerdal
P G Lund-Larsen
J T Lien
S. Langård
Author Affiliation
Telemark Central Hospital, Department of Occupational Medicine, Skien, Norway.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 1995 Feb;37(2):189-93
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestosis - classification - prevention & control - radiography
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mass Chest X-Ray
Middle Aged
Norway
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
A sample of 1388 10 x 10 cm chest X-rays from a previous population screening of males aged 40+ years were reevaluated by use of the ILO classification. There were 1036 films of subjects from an industrialized town, and 352 from a rural community. The observed rates of parenchymal changes (profusion > or = 1/0) at the reevaluation were 1.3% in the urban community and 3.4% in the rural community. The corresponding figures for pleural changes were 5.0% and 0.6%, respectively. Based on additional questionnaire information on asbestos exposure, it was found that the radiographic changes were probably related to past asbestos exposure for 2.3% of the subjects from the urban community and 0.6% from the rural community. In cases of asbestos-related illnesses the mean time since first exposure to asbestos was 35.9 years, whereas the mean duration of the exposures was 11.4 years. The results seem to indicate that the ILO reassessment of the radiographs was more sensitive in detecting pleural changes than the previous clinical screening of both small and large films.
PubMed ID
7655960 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among asbestos-exposed chemical industry workers: an extended observation period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24946
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1991;20(2):261-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
B. Hilt
A. Andersen
J. Rosenberg
S. Langård
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Telemark Sentralsjukehus, Porsgrunn, Norway.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1991;20(2):261-4
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Chemical Industry
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
A previous study on the incidence of cancer in a cohort of 286 asbestos-exposed electrochemical industry workers observed from 1953 through 1980 has been extended with another 8 years of follow-up. The incidence of cancer was derived from the Cancer Registry of Norway, and the expected figures were calculated by a life table method. During the extended follow-up period from 1981 through 1988, among the cohort members there were 12 new cancer cases versus 14.2 expected (SIR 85, 95% CI 44-158). In a lightly exposed sub-cohort, the extended follow-up revealed 4 cases of lung cancer or pleural mesothelioma (ICD, 7th revision 162-163) versus 1.6 cases expected (SIR 256, 95% CI71-654). In a heavily exposed sub-cohort, the corresponding figures were 3 and 0.5 (SIR 588, 95% CI 118-1,725).
PubMed ID
1951372 View in PubMed
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Chest radiographs in subjects with asbestos-related abnormalities: comparison between ILO categorizations and clinical reading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224610
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1992;21(6):855-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
B. Hilt
A. Borgerson
J T Lien
S. Langård
Author Affiliation
Telemark Sentralsjukehus, Department of Occupational Medicine, Porsgrunn, Norway.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1992;21(6):855-61
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestosis - classification - radiography
Humans
Lung - radiography
Male
Mass Screening
Norway
Pleura - radiography
United Nations
Abstract
The findings of a previous chest X-ray screening, determined without using standardized criteria, were reassessed by means of the ILO classification. Of 470 radiographs that had been determined as showing asbestos-related changes, 430 were categorized according to the ILO Classification. Small opacities with profusion greater than or equal to 1/0 were described in 39 (52%) of 75 participants who, on the original clinical reading, had been determined as having lung fibrosis, and in 45 (12.7%) of 355 who were determined as having pleural changes only. When considering circumscribed pleural thickening at the chest wall or diaphragm, as categorized by the ILO Classification, such changes were present in 401 (93.7%) of 428 subjects with pleural changes as determined on the clinical reading. In addition to the improved sensitivity and specificity achieved, the ILO Classification also allows comparison with other studies. The most apparent disadvantage of the ILO system is that it cannot firmly separate the various types of asbestos-related pleural changes. The study revealed that the previous asbestos exposure of the case subjects had occurred in many different workplaces and occupations.
PubMed ID
1621693 View in PubMed
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[Exposure to asbestos and asbestos-related pulmonary changes among employees at a magnesium plant].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224147
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Mar 10;112(7):897-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1992
Author
B. Hilt
S. Langård
J. Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Yrkesmedisinsk avdeling Telemark Sentralsjukehus, Porsgrunn.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Mar 10;112(7):897-900
Date
Mar-10-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestosis
Humans
Magnesium - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure
Pleural Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
Prevalence of disease related to previous exposure to asbestos was investigated in a cohort of 394 men who had worked for more than a year at a magnesium plant before 1970. Radiography showed lung fibrosis in nine men (2.3%) and pleural plaques in 40 men (9.5%). Prevalence rates varied considerably between sub-groups subjected to different modes of exposure. For the whole cohort there was a positive correlation between prevalence rate of radiographic changes and duration of work entailing exposure to asbestos. Subjects with pleural changes had more dyspnoea than found in an external reference material. Vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second was significantly reduced for the whole cohort. A significant reduction in lung function was found among a larger proportion of subjects with pleural changes than among subjects with no radiographic indications of such changes. The results unveil a need for similar surveys among workers in other energy-intensive industries where a similar mode of exposure to asbestos may be assumed.
PubMed ID
1557759 View in PubMed
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Health survey of former workers in a Norwegian coke plant: Part 2. Cancer incidence and cause specific mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21323
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1998 Sep;55(9):622-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
T. Bye
P R Romundstad
A. Rønneberg
B. Hilt
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1998 Sep;55(9):622-6
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Monoxide - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Coke
Health Surveys
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - adverse effects
Incidence
Male
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A Norwegian coke plant that operated from 1964 to 1988 was investigated to ascertain whether the male workers in this plant had increased morbidities of cancer or increased mortality from specific causes, particularly associated with specific exposures at the coke plant. METHODS: Personal data on all the employees of the plant were obtained from the plant's archives. With additional data from the Norwegian Bureau of Statistics we identified 888 male former workers at the plant. Causes of death were obtained from the Norwegian Bureau of Statistics, and cancer diagnoses from the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The results were compared with national averages adjusted for age. Specific exposures were estimated with records of actual measurements done at the plant and interviews with former workers at the plant. RESULTS: A significant excess of stomach cancer (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 2.22, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.01 to 4.21) was found. Mortality from ischaemic heart disease and sudden death was positively associated with work in areas which entailed peak exposures to CO. When considering work in such areas the past 3 years before death, the association was significant (p = 0.01). The last result is based on only two deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the short follow up time and the small size of the cohort the results should be interpreted with a certain caution. The positive results would justify a re-examination of the cohort at a later date.
PubMed ID
9861185 View in PubMed
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[Incidence and physicians' registration of assumed occupational lung cancer in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22229
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 20;117(2):203-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1997
Author
B. Hilt
H L Leira
H. Hjelde
S. Sundstrøm
E. Brynildsen
Author Affiliation
Arbeidsmedisinsk avdeling, Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jan 20;117(2):203-7
Date
Jan-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Disease Notification
English Abstract
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Registries
Abstract
About 20% of al lung cancers among men are attributable to occupational exposure. During the years 1991 through 1993, Norwegian doctors reported 161 (4.6%) of 3.510 incidents of cancer in Norwegian men to the Labour Inspection as probably caused by occupational exposure. The proportion of such assumed occupational lung cancer cases varied with geographical region from 0.7% to 6.7%. Notification of an occupational cancer can be justification for economic benefits to the patient and his/her family. The most common assumed causes of the 161 cases notified as occupational lung cancers were asbestos dust exposure (148 cases), exposure to nickel (21 cases), and exposure to stone dust containing crystalline silica (18 cases). The predominating occupations of the patients at the time of the assumed carcinogenic exposure were machinist, industrial worker in metallurgical or chemical industry, mechanic, or metal worker (metal sheet worker, welder).
PubMed ID
9064834 View in PubMed
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Lung function and respiratory symptoms in subjects with asbestos-related disorders: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68007
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1987;11(5):517-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
B. Hilt
J T Lien
P G Lund-Larsen
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1987;11(5):517-28
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration
Respiratory Function Tests
Smoking
Abstract
The prevalence of respiratory symptoms and lung function impairment was studied in a sample of men from a population screening of asbestos-related disorders. When the rates were adjusted for age and smoking habits, 83 subjects with lung fibrosis had an increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms, in particular, phlegm when coughing and breathlessness grades 1-3. Among 200 subjects under 70 years of age who had pleural plaques only, a statistically significant increase was observed in the prevalence of breathlessness grade 1 compared to an external reference population. Among 98 asbestos-exposed subjects who had normal chest X-rays, there was an increase in the prevalence of breathlessness grade 2, cough during the day, and phlegm when coughing. There was a higher proportion of subjects with lung fibrosis who were below 80% of the predicted values for forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) than in the other groups. There was also a higher proportion of subjects with pleural plaques only who were below 90% of the predicted value for FVC than in a group of 90 subjects without asbestos exposure. In accordance with previous studies, these results indicate that pleural plaques in asbestos workers may be of greater importance as a clinical feature than has been recognized in the past.
PubMed ID
3496005 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lung function and respiratory symptoms related to changes in smoking habits in asbestos-exposed subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67681
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 1996 Feb;38(2):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
H P Waage
L J Vatten
E. Opedal
B. Hilt
Author Affiliation
Telemark Central Hospital, Department of Occupational Medicine, Skien, Norway.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 1996 Feb;38(2):178-83
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestosis - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Follow-Up Studies
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects - physiopathology
Smoking Cessation
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine respiratory symptoms and lung function (forced vital capacity [FVC] and forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]) as related to changes in smoking habits in subjects previously exposed to asbestos. The study was linked to a smoke-ending program among asbestos-exposed males. Subjects were recruited from a population-based survey, and 231 smokers met for the baseline consultation. The baseline prevalences of cough, chronic cough, and dyspnea among smokers were 68.0%, 44.6%, and 42.4%, respectively. Both smoke-ending (n = 10) and tobacco reduction (n = 52) during the 2-year follow-up resulted in remission of cough and chronic cough, whereas dyspnea was unaffected. When the 2-year measurements of FVC and FEV1 were adjusted for the respective baseline measurements, FEV1 tended to improve in subjects who had quit during the study, relative to the continuing smokers. It was concluded that both smoke-ending and reduction of tobacco consumption resulted in reduction of cough and chronic cough, but not of dyspnea. The study further suggests a possible positive effect of smoking cessation on FEV1, but not merely by reduction of tobacco consumption.
PubMed ID
8673522 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.