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44 records – page 1 of 5.

Bias in diet assessment methods--consequences of collinearity and measurement errors on power and observed relative risks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61917
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Oct;26(5):1071-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
S. Elmståhl
B. Gullberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Oct;26(5):1071-9
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Diet Surveys
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nutrition Assessment
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: If several risk factors for disease are considered in a regression model and these factors are affected by measurement errors, the observed relative risk will be attenuated. In nutritional epidemiology, several nutrient variables show strong correlation, described as collinearity. The observed relative risk will then depend not only on the validity of the chosen diet assessment method but also on collinearity between variables in the model. METHODS: The validity of different diet assessment methods are compared. The correlation coefficients between common nutrients and foods are given using data from the Malm? Food Study. Intake of nutrients and foods were assessed with a modified diet history method, combining a 2-week food record for beverages and lunch/dinner meals and a food frequency questionnaire for other foods. The study population comprised 165 men and women aged 50-65 years. A multivariate logistic regression model is used to illustrate the effect of collinearity on observed relative risk (RRo). RESULTS: A moderate to high correlation between risk factors will substantially influence RRo even when using diet assessment methods with high validity. Methods with low validity might even give inverse RRo. CONCLUSION: It is stressed that caution must be exercised and only a selected number of variables should be included in the model, especially when they are highly intercorrelated, since RRo might be severely biased.
PubMed ID
9363530 View in PubMed
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Birth weight is associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17444
Source
Br J Cancer. 2004 Nov 1;91(9):1666-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2004
Author
P H Lahmann
B. Gullberg
H. Olsson
H. Boeing
G. Berglund
L. Lissner
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. lahmann@mail.dife.de
Source
Br J Cancer. 2004 Nov 1;91(9):1666-8
Date
Nov-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Birth weight
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Postmenopause - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is some evidence that birth weight is associated with breast cancer. Whether this association differs between premenopausal and postmenopausal ages is still unclear. The results from this study suggest that higher birth weight is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer (OR 1.06, CI 1.00-1.12, per 100 g), independent of selected early-life and adult factors.
PubMed ID
15477861 View in PubMed
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[Cancer occurrence in Sweden in the year 2000--a study of various prognostic models]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26630
Source
Lakartidningen. 1985 Mar 6;82(10):844-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-1985
Author
C. Jogreus
B. Gullberg
T R Möller
J. Ranstam
Source
Lakartidningen. 1985 Mar 6;82(10):844-9
Date
Mar-6-1985
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prognosis
Sweden
PubMed ID
3990449 View in PubMed
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Circadian distribution of onset of acute myocardial infarction in subgroups from analysis of 10,791 patients treated in a single center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55152
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1992 Apr 15;69(12):1003-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1992
Author
O. Hansen
B W Johansson
B. Gullberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, General Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1992 Apr 15;69(12):1003-8
Date
Apr-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
A circadian variation of symptom onset in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with an increased frequency in the late morning and possibly also in the evening has been found in several studies. It has been suggested that different circadian rhythms may exist in various subgroups of patients. This possibility was examined in a population of 10,791 patients collected between 1973 and 1987 in a continuously operating register of patients with AMI in Malmö, Sweden. In 6,763 patients (63%) in whom a distinct symptom onset could be established, symptom onset occurred with an increased frequency between 6:01 A.M. and 12:00 noon (30.6%) and between 6:01 P.M. and 12:00 midnight (26.9%). Similar bimodal circadian rhythms were seen in patients aged greater than 70 years (n = 2,923), less than or equal to 70 years (n = 3,840), men (n = 4,528), women (n = 2,235), smokers (n = 2,458), hypertensives (n = 1,999), diabetics (n = 653), patients with (n = 1,872) and without (n = 4,891) a history of previous AMI, and in patients with recent non-Q-wave AMI (n = 333). In 455 patients receiving cardioselective beta blockers the circadian distribution did not differ from a random, whereas in patients taking nonselective beta blockers or calcium antagonists significant bimodal rhythms were found. Statistically significant interactions were found between symptom onset and age dichotomized at 70 years, and between patients with and without a history of previous AMI. In a multivariate analysis only these variables age less than or equal to/greater than 70 years; +/- history of a previous AMI) were found to modify the circadian rhythm of symptom onset in the population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1561970 View in PubMed
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Clinical outcome of acute myocardial infarction in patients on treatment with beta-blockers or calcium antagonists. A study of 7,922 hospitalized first myocardial infarctions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55192
Source
Cardiology. 1992;80(5-6):382-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
O. Hansen
B W Johansson
B. Gullberg
Author Affiliation
Section of Cardiology, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Cardiology. 1992;80(5-6):382-91
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Arrest - etiology
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality
Potassium - blood
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Tachycardia, Ventricular - mortality
Abstract
To assess the effects of current treatments with beta-blockers or calcium antagonists on the clinical outcome of acute myocardial infarction (MI), enzymatically estimated infarct sizes, circulatory arrests from ventricular tachyarrhythmias, ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF), and in-hospital mortality were analyzed retrospectively from 7,922 citizens of Malmö, Sweden, hospitalized due to a first MI between 1973 and 1987. Of these patients, 296 were on treatment with calcium antagonists, 393 on treatment with a beta 1-selective beta-blocker, 482 with a nonselective beta-blocker, and 95 on combined treatment with beta-blockers and calcium antagonists at the time of admission to hospital. In a set of multivariate analyses including several clinical characteristics, patients on treatment with a nonselective beta-blocker had a significantly lower peak aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT; difference -0.70 mukat/l, 95% CL: -1.24 to -0.16), whereas no significant relations between peak ASAT and treatment with cardioselective beta-blockers or calcium antagonists were found. Treatment with cardioselective beta-blockers or calcium antagonists, in contrast to treatment with a nonselective beta-blocker, were significant predictors of the occurrence of circulatory arrests from VT/VF. The relative risk of VT/VF in patients on cardioselective beta-blockers was 1.51 (95% CI: 1.12-2.03), and in patients on calcium antagonists 1.44 (95% CI: 1.03-2.02). None of the treatments were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. In patients on beta-blockers or calcium antagonists when suffering their first MI, nonselective beta-blockade may reduce infarct size. Treatment with beta-blockers or calcium antagonists identified patients with an increased risk of circulatory arrests from VT/VF, but neither of the treatments were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. We suggest that only minor differences exist between the effects of chronic treatment with beta-blockers and calcium antagonists on the outcome of an acute MI.
PubMed ID
1360331 View in PubMed
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Development of hypertension over 6 years in a birth cohort of young middle-aged men: the Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study in southern Sweden (CRISS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9951
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Jul;252(1):21-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
K M Henriksson
U. Lindblad
B. Gullberg
B. Agren
P. Nilsson-Ehle
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. karin.heriksson@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2002 Jul;252(1):21-6
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Obesity - complications
Physical Examination
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To explore the development of hypertension (HT) in a cohort of young middle-aged men. DESIGN: Prospective birth-cohort study of men surveyed over 6 years. SETTING: Helsingborg County Hospital, Sweden, 1990-97. SUBJECTS: A total of 628 men born in 1953-54, all surveyed at 37, 40 and 43 years of age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), S-cholesterol, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, ethnicity. HT was defined as SBP > or = 140 mmHg and/or DBP > or = 90 mmHg, or ongoing treatment. Using SBP
PubMed ID
12074734 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns in high and low consumers of meat in a Swedish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21141
Source
Appetite. 1999 Apr;32(2):191-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
S. Elmståhl
O. Holmqvist
B. Gullberg
U. Johansson
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University.
Source
Appetite. 1999 Apr;32(2):191-206
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cohort Studies
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Meat - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective was to examine relationships between meat and other food items which have been associated with higher risk of cancer in the colon and prostate in some epidemiological studies. The study was conducted as a population-based cohort study comprising 11648 subjects (4816 male and 6742 female) born between 1926 and 1945 and living in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Data on mean daily intake of foods and nutrients were assessed with a diet history method combining a 7-day menu book and a food frequency questionnaire. Increasing meat intake, expressed in quintiles and adjusted for energy, was associated with decreasing intakes of poultry, fish, fruits, bread, cereals and cheese in both sexes. Low negative correlations between meat intake and ascorbic acid (r= -0.11) and fiber (r= -0.16 to -0.20) were noted. The average intake of fat from meat out of total fat intake was 13.6% in men and 11.9% in women. No major associations were noted between meat and the cholesterol raising fatty acids C:12:0, C:14:0, C:160 nor for C:20:4 or its precursor C:18:2. In conclusion, our findings indicate that meat consumption is negatively associated with food groups rich in antioxidants and fiber and the positive covariance reported between meat and cancer and coronary heart disease might, therefore, not be directly linked to components in meat.
PubMed ID
10097025 View in PubMed
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Differences in body fat and central adiposity between Swedes and European immigrants: the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19981
Source
Obes Res. 2000 Dec;8(9):620-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
P H Lahmann
L. Lissner
B. Gullberg
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden. P.Lahmann@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Obes Res. 2000 Dec;8(9):620-31
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Aged
Body Composition
Body Constitution - ethnology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electric Impedance
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Comparative data on ecological differences in body fatness and fat distribution within Europe are sparse. Migration studies may provide information on the impact of environmental factors on body size in different populations. The objective was to investigate differences in adiposity between European immigrants and native Swedes, specifically to examine gender differences and the effect of time since immigration, and to compare two selected immigrant groups with their native countrymen. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: A cross-sectional analysis of 27,808 adults aged 45 to 73 years participating in the Malmö Diet and Cancer prospective cohort study in Sweden was performed. Percentage body fat (impedance analysis) and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were compared between Swedish-born and foreign-born participants. RESULTS: Obesity was 40% more prevalent in non-Swedish Europeans compared with Swedes. Controlling for age, height, smoking, physical activity, and occupation, it was found that women born in the former Yugoslavia, southern Europe, Hungary, and Finland had a significantly higher percentage of body fat, and those from Hungary, Poland, and Germany had more centralized adiposity compared with Swedish women. Men born in the former Yugoslavia, Hungary, and Denmark had a significantly higher mean percentage of body fat compared with Swedish-born men, whereas Yugoslavian, Finnish, and German men differed significantly in mean WHR. Length of residence in Sweden was inversely associated with central adiposity in immigrants. A comparison between German and Danish immigrants, their respective native populations, and Swedes indicated an intermediate positioning of German immigrants with regard to body mass index and WHR. DISCUSSION: Differences in general and central adiposity by country of origin appear to remain after migration. Central adiposity seems to be more influenced than fatness per se by time of residency in Sweden.
PubMed ID
11225710 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of soft-tissue sarcoma in the locomotor system. A retrospective population-based study of the inter-relationships between clinical and morphologic variables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26724
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [A]. 1984 Sep;92(5):363-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1984
Author
A. Rydholm
N O Berg
B. Gullberg
K G Thorngren
B M Persson
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Immunol Scand [A]. 1984 Sep;92(5):363-74
Date
Sep-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Locomotion
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Sarcoma - epidemiology - pathology
Sex Factors
Soft Tissue Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Sweden
Abstract
From all soft-tissue malignancies reported to the Swedish National Cancer Registry in Southern Sweden (1.3 mill. inhabitants) from 1964 through 1978, 278 cases were accepted as sarcomas after histologic re-examination. All these were malignancy-graded on a four-grade scale, without knowledge of the clinical course. A number of clinical and morphological variables were recorded and subjected to uni-, bi- and multi-variate analysis. Follow-up was available in all patients. The annual incidence rate over all ages was 1.4/100,000. The mean age was 58 years and males dominated (1.3/1). Malignant fibrous histiocytoma, liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma were the most common histologic groups. Three-fourths of the tumors were high-grade malignant (Grade III-IV). Sixty per cent were deep-seated, having a median size of 8 cm compared to 4 cm for the superficial tumors. One third of all tumors were located in the thigh. The histologic groups were characterized by age, tumor depth and size, the occurrence of pain, malignancy grade and five-year survival; it was seen that each group, with respect to at least one of the variables, differed significantly from all the other groups. Thus histologic classification seems to identify different tumor entities. Out of several pair-wise associations the strongest were as follows: histologic groups versus depth, size, malignancy grade and age; depth versus size; and size versus malignancy grade (Grade IV tumors being larger). The proportion of superficial and small tumors in this series is high, compared to several reported series, probably owing to "referral selection" in the previous studies. The inter-relationships found between several variables and conclusions based on selected series may explain, in part, the differing opinions which can be found in the literature regarding prognostic variables in soft-tissue sarcoma.
PubMed ID
6507101 View in PubMed
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Food patterns and components of the metabolic syndrome in men and women: a cross-sectional study within the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19412
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec 15;154(12):1150-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2001
Author
E. Wirfält
B. Hedblad
B. Gullberg
I. Mattisson
C. Andrén
U. Rosander
L. Janzon
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Orthopedics and Surgery, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. elisabet.wirfalt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec 15;154(12):1150-9
Date
Dec-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Aged
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Hyperlipidemia
Insulin Resistance
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Recall
Metabolic Syndrome X
Middle Aged
Obesity - metabolism - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study examined the relations between food patterns and five components of the metabolic syndrome in a sample of Swedish men (n = 2,040) and women (n = 2,959) aged 45-68 years who joined the Malmö Diet and Cancer study from November 1991 to February 1994. Baseline examinations included an interview-administered diet history, a self-administered questionnaire, blood pressure and anthropologic measurements, and blood samples donated after an overnight fast. Cluster analysis identified six food patterns for which 43 food group variables were used. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the risk of each component (hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and central obesity) and food patterns, controlling for potential confounders. The study demonstrated relations, independent of specific nutrients, between food patterns and hyperglycemia and central obesity in men and hyperinsulinemia in women. Food patterns dominated by fiber bread provided favorable effects, while food patterns high in refined bread or in cheese, cake, and alcoholic beverages contributed adverse effects. In women, food patterns dominated by milk-fat-based spread showed protective relations with hyperinsulinemia. Relations between risk factors and food patterns may partly depend on gender differences in metabolism or food consumption and on variations in confounders across food patterns.
PubMed ID
11744521 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.