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Are changes in left ventricular volume as measured with the biplane Simpson's method predominantly related to changes in its area or long axis in the prognostic evaluation of remodelling following a myocardial infarction?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53776
Source
Eur J Echocardiogr. 2001 Jun;2(2):118-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
J E Otterstad
M. St John Sutton
G. Frøland
T. Skjaerpe
B. Graving
I. Holmes
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Vestfold Central Hospital, Toensberg, Norway.
Source
Eur J Echocardiogr. 2001 Jun;2(2):118-25
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Echocardiography
Endpoint Determination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Ventricles - ultrasonography
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stroke Volume - physiology
Ventricular Remodeling - physiology
Abstract
AIMS: Two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography has been widely applied to measure left ventricular volumes with the biplane Simpson's method in the assessment of left ventricular remodelling following an acute myocardial infarction. This volume formula is based upon tracings of endocardium and measurement of long axis on left ventricular images. In the present follow-up study of post-myocardial infarction patients we evaluated the prognostic impact of changes in left ventricular areas and geometry versus long axis to determine if only long-axis measurements may be used for prognostic purposes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Two-dimensional echocardiographic video recordings of the apical four-chamber and long-axis views were obtained in 756 patients 2--7 days and 3 months following an acute myocardial infarction. All videotapes were sent to a core laboratory and left ventricular volumes were measured with the biplane Simpson's method in end-diastole and end-systole. During the first 3 months 44 patients had suffered one of the following end-points and were excluded: cardiac death, recurrent myocardial infarction, heart failure or chronic arrhythmia. Over a period of 3--24 months 58 such end-points occurred. With the Cox proportional hazards model the increase in left ventricular systolic volume was the strongest predictor for such events (Chi-square 18.5, P
PubMed ID
11882438 View in PubMed
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[Echocardiographic findings, pro-ANP and treatment in acute myocardial infarction without overt heart failure]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54191
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Aug 20;119(19):2802-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1999
Author
J E Otterstad
C. Hall
B. Graving
T. Skjaerpe
I. Holme
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling Vestfold sentralsykehus, Tønsberg.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Aug 20;119(19):2802-5
Date
Aug-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - analysis
Controlled Clinical Trials
Echocardiography
English Abstract
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - ultrasonography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Norway
Stroke Volume
Thrombolytic Therapy
Ventricular Function, Left
Ventricular Remodeling
Abstract
This study was undertaken to characterise patients without overt heart failure and with a left ventricular ejection fraction > or = 40% 2-7 days following an acute myocardial infarction. Patients with an ejection fraction > or = 40% (n = 868) had a lower prevalence of anterior myocardial infarction (p or = 40% had smaller left ventricular volume and mass (p or = 40%. Pro-ANP levels were not correlated with the ejection fraction or left ventricular volume. Approximately two thirds of the patients received thrombolytic treatment.
PubMed ID
10494198 View in PubMed
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Treatment of hypertensive and hypercholesterolaemic patients in general practice. The effect of captopril, atenolol and pravastatin combined with life style intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10639
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1999 Jun;17(2):122-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
O P Foss
S. Graff-Iversen
H. Istad
E. Søyland
L. Tjeldflaat
B. Graving
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Ullevaal Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1999 Jun;17(2):122-7
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Atenolol - therapeutic use
Captopril - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - drug therapy
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pravastatin - therapeutic use
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the effect on blood pressure and blood lipids of an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (captopril), and a beta-receptor blocking agent (atenolol), given alone or in combination with a cholesterol reducing drug, the beta-hydroxy-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor pravastatin, in patients who were also encouraged to improve their lifestyle. DESIGN: A longitudinal study consisting of three phases. I: Lifestyle intervention alone. II: Continued lifestyle intervention combined with captopril or atenolol. III: Continued lifestyle intervention combined with the same drugs as in phase II and in addition pravastatin or placebo. SETTING: Fifty-four general practice surgeries in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: Hypertensive patients, 210 females and 160 males, treated or untreated with antihypertensive drugs with a sitting diastolic blood pressure between 95 and 115 mmHg and a serum total cholesterol between 6.5 mmol/l (7.0 for those age 60-67 years) and 9.0 mmol/l. RESULTS: The antihypertensive effect of captopril and atenolol was not influenced by concurrent administration of pravastatin. The effect of pravastatin was not limited by concurrent medication with captopril or atenolol. Improvement in lifestyle seemed to reduce the need for supplementary treatment with diuretics. CONCLUSION: Pravastatin can be used in combination with captopril or atenolol in the treatment of hypertensive and hypercholesterolaemic patients.
PubMed ID
10439497 View in PubMed
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