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26 records – page 1 of 3.

Analgesics and chronic pain: "if all you have is a hammer, every disease is a nail".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226182
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jun 15;144(12):1660-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1991
Author
B. Goldman
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jun 15;144(12):1660-4
Date
Jun-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics - adverse effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Humans
Legislation, Pharmacy
Opioid-Related Disorders
Pain - drug therapy
United States
Notes
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 1987 Oct;20(4):467-763316149
Cites: Drugs. 1986 Nov;32(5):425-443098541
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 1984 Mar;13(3):295-86427173
Cites: Indian J Med Res. 1983 Sep;78:337-426674155
Cites: Br J Dermatol. 1988 Aug;119(2):189-983139019
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Apr 5;122(7):765-96988070
Cites: J Hosp Infect. 1981 Mar;2(1):11-366176621
Cites: J Med Microbiol. 1984 Feb;17(1):1-126229637
PubMed ID
2054773 View in PubMed
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Ayurvedism: eastern medicine moves west.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226969
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jan 15;144(2):218-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1991
Author
B. Goldman
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Jan 15;144(2):218-21
Date
Jan-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Behavior
Biochemical Phenomena
Biochemistry
Canada
Disease
Humans
Medicine
Medicine, Ayurvedic
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1991 Jul 1;145(1):9-122049699
PubMed ID
1986838 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and ovulatory infertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218680
Source
Epidemiology. 1994 Mar;5(2):247-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
F. Grodstein
M B Goldman
D W Cramer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115.
Source
Epidemiology. 1994 Mar;5(2):247-50
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anovulation - epidemiology - etiology
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - etiology
Obesity - complications
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Several studies have examined the association between body mass index and infertility. We compared body mass index in 597 women diagnosed with ovulatory infertility at seven infertility clinics in the United States and Canada with 1,695 primiparous controls who recently gave birth. The obese women (body mass index > or = 27) had a relative risk of ovulatory infertility of 3.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.2-4.4], compared with women of lower body weight (body mass index 20-24.9). We found a small effect in women with a body mass index of 25-26.9 or less than 17 [relative risk (RR) = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.8-1.9; and RR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7-3.9, respectively). We conclude that the risk of ovulatory infertility is highest in obese women but is also slightly increased in moderately overweight and underweight women.
PubMed ID
8173001 View in PubMed
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Canadian children: will today's "couch potatoes" be tomorrow's cardiac patients?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233251
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Apr 1;138(7):648-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1988
Author
B. Goldman
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Apr 1;138(7):648-9
Date
Apr-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Physical Exertion
Physical Fitness
PubMed ID
3355938 View in PubMed
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Clinical results of pericardial xenograft valves: the Ionescu-Shiley and Hancock valves.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232556
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1988 Sep;4(6):328-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
B. Goldman
H. Scully
C. Tong
R. Mandell
J. Butany
J. Azuma
L. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1988 Sep;4(6):328-32
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Aortic Valve
Bioprosthesis - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Diseases - surgery
Heart Valve Prosthesis - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve
Ontario
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prosthesis Design
Reoperation
Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Abstract
Between 1979 and 1985, 552 Ionescu-Shiley valves were implanted in 511 patients. The Hancock valve was implanted in 122 patients (129 valves) between 1982 and 1983. Sixty percent of procedures were isolated aortic valve replacements. In the Ionescu series, 59% of these were 19 or 21 mm valves while only 15% of the Hancock valves were of this size. For isolated mitral valve replacement, 76% of Ionescu-Shiley valves were 25 to 27 mm, compared to 36% of the Hancock valves. Patient age, sex, prior operations, concomitant surgery (usually coronary bypass), operative mortality and late deaths were similar for both valves. A mean follow-up of 38 months was obtained for each valve population (99% complete) representing a cumulative 1497 patient-years for the Ionescu-Shiley valve and 375.4 patient-years for the Hancock valve. Actuarial survival for the former was 73 +/- 4% at 72 months, and 65 +/- 14% for Hancock valves at 60 months. The frequency of major events during follow-up (thromboembolism, anticoagulant related hemorrhage, bland perivalvular leak and prosthetic valve endocarditis) were similar, but the frequency of primary tissue valve failure was markedly different for the two valves (1.1% per patient-year for Ionescu-Shiley valves and 5.9% for the Hancock valve). The mean interval to replacement of an Ionescu mitral prosthesis was significantly shorter (23.4 months) than for replacement of an aortic prosthesis (42 months) while the mean interval to replacement of an Ionescu aortic and/or a Hancock aortic or mitral were all similar.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3179796 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Oct 15;131(8):957-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-1984
Author
B. Goldman
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Oct 15;131(8):957-9
Date
Oct-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Camping
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Life Style
Pediatrics
Physicians
PubMed ID
6488123 View in PubMed
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Fighting back: the search for a solution to prescription drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235352
Source
CMAJ. 1987 Apr 1;136(7):745-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1987

Five-year follow-up of Hancock pericardial valves: management of premature failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232586
Source
J Card Surg. 1988 Sep;3(3 Suppl):397-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
H. Scully
B. Goldman
J. Fulop
J. Butany
C. Tong
J. Azuma
L. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Prosthetic Valve Registry, Toronto General Hospital, Canada.
Source
J Card Surg. 1988 Sep;3(3 Suppl):397-403
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aortic Valve
Bioprosthesis - standards
Cause of Death
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Diseases - mortality - surgery
Heart Valve Prosthesis - adverse effects - mortality - standards
Hospitals, General
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mitral Valve
Ontario - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Prosthesis Design - standards
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Tricuspid Valve
Abstract
The durability and function of bovine pericardial valves are dependent upon design, preservation, patient factors (age, sex), and site of valve implantation. In 1983, a shelf recall of all Hancock bovine pericardial valves (HPV) was instituted by the manufacturer. This report represents the results of an organized 5-year follow-up in a hospital Prosthetic Valve Registry of 129 HPV implanted in 122 patients (79 males, 43 females) between May 1982 and April 1985 using echo Doppler and careful clinical evaluation. Mean age was 56 +/- 15 years. There were 81 AVR, 33 MVR, 7 DVR, and 1 TVR. Concomitant coronary bypass was performed in 38 patients (31%). Surgery was on a redo basis in 25 patients (20%), urgent in 14 (11%), and for SBE in 8 patients (7%). There were seven hospital deaths (5.7%). Mean follow-up was 44 months (maximum 66 months) for 114 patients (99% complete), representing 417 patient years. There have been 20 late deaths (18%), of which 7 were directly valve related. Linearized frequency of major events (per pt-yr) was: thromboembolism, 1.6%; anticoagulant related hemorrhage, 0.8% (1 late death); prosthetic valve endocarditis 1.3%; primary tissue failure, 5.8%. Patient symptomatology was a more accurate predictor of bioprosthetic failure requiring reoperation than echo Doppler studies, which were completed in 74 of 97 patients examined during scheduled follow-up visits. Twenty-four of the 96 patients (25%) have required re-replacement at a mean interval of 44 months (27-59 months) from initial implantation. This was due to vertical shear starting at the top of the strut anchoring commissural attachments in every case.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2980043 View in PubMed
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Increased maternal age and the risk of fetal death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214097
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Oct 12;333(15):953-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-12-1995
Author
R C Fretts
J. Schmittdiel
F H McLean
R H Usher
M B Goldman
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1995 Oct 12;333(15):953-7
Date
Oct-12-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Quebec
Risk factors
Abstract
Although the fetal death rate has declined over the past 30 years among women of all ages, it is unknown whether particular characteristics of the mother, such as age, still affect the risk of fetal death. We undertook a study to determine whether older age, having a first child (nulliparity), or other characteristics of the mother are risk factors for fetal death.
We used data from the McGill Obstetrical Neonatal Database to evaluate risk factors for fetal death among all deliveries at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal (n = 94,346) from 1961 through 1993. Data were available for two time periods (1961 through 1974 and 1978 through 1993); data for 1975 through 1977 have not been entered into the data base and were therefore not included. Using logistic regression, we estimated the effect of specific maternal characteristics and complications of pregnancy on the risk of fetal death.
The fetal death rate decreased significantly from 11.5 per 1000 total births (including live births and stillbirths) in the 1960s to 3.2 per 1000 in 1990 through 1993 (P
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 1995 Oct 12;333(15):1002-47666897
PubMed ID
7666913 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.