Skip header and navigation

Refine By

34 records – page 1 of 4.

Ability to estimate oral health status and treatment need in elderly receiving home nursing--a comparison between a dental hygienist and a dentist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62818
Source
Swed Dent J. 2000;24(3):105-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
T. Nederfors
G. Paulsson
R. Isaksson
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2000;24(3):105-16
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Dental Care for Aged - methods - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Diagnosis, Oral - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Observer Variation
Oral Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the estimation ability of a dental hygienist to that of a dentist when, independently, recording the oral health status and treatment need in a population of elderly, receiving home nursing. Seventy-three persons, enrolled in a home nursing long-time care programme, were recruited. For the oral examination a newly developed protocol with comparatively blunt measurement variables was used. The oral examination protocol was tested for construct validity and for internal consistency reliability. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank sum test for testing differences, while inter-examiner agreement was estimated by calculating the kappa-values. Comparing the two examiners, good agreement was demonstrated for all mucosal recordings, colour, form, wounds, blisters, mucosal index, and for the palatal but not the lingual mucosa. For the latter, the dental hygienist recorded significantly more changes. The dental hygienist also recorded significantly higher plaque index values. Also regarding treatment intention and treatment need, the dental hygienist's estimation was somewhat higher. In conclusion, when comparing the dental hygienist's and the dentist's ability to estimate oral health status, treatment intention, and treatment need, some differences were observed, the dental hygienist tending to register "on the safe side", calling attention to the importance of inter-examiner calibration. However, for practical purpose the inter-examiner agreement was acceptable, constituting a promising basis for future out-reach activities.
PubMed ID
11061208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute myocardial infarction patients' chest pain as monitored and evaluated by ambulance personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55133
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 1992 Jun;8(2):113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
B. Fridlund
B. Carlsson
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 1992 Jun;8(2):113-7
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel - standards
Chest Pain - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology
Evaluation Studies
Humans
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods - standards
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
A delicate duty for ambulance personnel is to care for patients who suffer from chest pain, caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI-patient). In Sweden pain-relieving drugs may be administered, such as: oxygen, entonox, or morphine according to the skill of the ambulance personnel. The aim of this study was to find out if AMI-patients' expressions of pain were monitored and evaluated, in which way the AMI-patients received pain-relief, and to which degree they were relieved of pain. Examinations of the records of the ambulance personnel's observations during transport of AMI-patients revealed that nine tenths of those who complained about chest pain received pain-relieving drugs. The results of the treatments varied, however, from a good rate of response to morphine to less responses to oxygen and entonox. In order to treat AMI-patients who are in need of pain-relief during their transit to hospital the ambulance personnel must possess thorough knowledge of both pain theory and communication theory. Furthermore, they need tools for assessment of pain and for administering adequate pain-relieving drugs in clinical practice. In the future it may be necessary to differentiate between ambulance personnel in routine service and those in emergency service according to their levels of education.
PubMed ID
1611285 View in PubMed
Less detail

The aphasic person's views of the encounter with other people: a grounded theory analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189814
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2002 Jun;9(3):285-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
S. Andersson
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics and Rehabilitation, County Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2002 Jun;9(3):285-92
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aphasia - nursing - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Theory
Self Concept
Social Isolation
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
Being affected by aphasia influences the total life experience. The aim of this study was to generate a theoretical model, from a nursing perspective, of what aphasic persons (n = 12) experience in encounters with other people. Data were collected through interviews which adopted a biophysical, socio-cultural and psychological approach and then analysed using grounded theory method. Two main categories emerged, namely: 'interaction' and 'support'. Encountered experiences led to: 'a feeling of having ability'; 'a feeling of being an outsider'; and 'a feeling of dejection or uncertainty'. The feeling state was dependent on whether the interaction was 'obstructed' or 'secure' and on whether the support resulted in 'strengthened' or 'impaired' self-esteem. Therefore nurses need to give support that enhances patients' self-esteem and which results in them gaining a positive and realistic view of their aphasia, as well as involving those around them in this perspective. This then will give the possibility for the patient to turn the interaction process from an obstructed into a secure one.
PubMed ID
12060372 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between socio-economic status and chest pain, focusing on self-rated health in a primary health care area of Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67401
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):420-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
A. Baigi
B. Marklund
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Primary Health Care Research & Development Unit, Halland County Council, PO Box 113, 311 22 Falkenberg, Sweden. amir.baigi@lthalland.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2001 Dec;11(4):420-4
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Chest Pain - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - classification
Primary Health Care
Questionnaires
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Social Class
State Medicine
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to determine, first, the association between men's and women's chest pain and their socio-economic status (occupation, smoking) and, secondly, the association between their socio-economic status and self-rated health, in a primary health care area. DESIGN AND SETTING: A population-based cross-sectional survey was made in a primary health care area of Sweden. Primarily based on occupation according to Swedish standards, 4,238 men and women were divided into two socio-economic groups; blue-collar and white-collar workers. METHODS: Odds ratios with 95% CI were calculated by multivariate logistic regression, controlling for the variable age as confounding factor. Student's t-test was used to compare self-rated health, and the chi 2-test to determine any difference in smoking habits between the two groups. MAIN RESULTS: Both male and female blue-collar workers showed significantly more chest pain when excited than white-collar workers. In six of eight health indices, they also reported significantly worse self-rated health than the white-collar workers. CONCLUSIONS: These findings show that there are socio-economic inequalities in self-reported chest pain. Furthermore, socio-economic status has a major influence on self-rated health, acting across the working life of both sexes.
PubMed ID
11766484 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer patients' experiences of nurses' behaviour and health promotion activities: a critical incident analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20357
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 1999 Dec;8(4):204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
M. Björklund
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Research, Halmstad University, Sweden. goran.bjorklund@telia.com
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 1999 Dec;8(4):204-12
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence - standards
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Job Description
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Nursing
Needs Assessment
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Oncologic Nursing - methods
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Abstract
Patients with head and neck cancer report several disease- and health-related problems before, during and a long time after completed treatment. Nurses have an important role in educating/supporting these patients about/through the disease and treatment so that they can attain well-being. This study describes the cancer patients' experiences of nurses' behaviour in terms of critical incidents after nurses had given them care to promote health. The study had a qualitative, descriptive design and the method used was the critical incident technique. Twenty-one informants from the Nordic countries diagnosed with head and neck cancer were strategically selected. It was explained to the informants what a critical incident implies before the interviews took place; this was defined as a major event of great importance, an incident, which the informants still remember, due to its great importance for the outcome of their health and well-being. The nurses' behaviour was examined, and critical incidents were involved in 208 cases-150 positive and 58 negative ones-the number of incidents varying between three and 20 per informant. The nurses' health promotion activities or lack of such activities based on the patients' disease, treatment and symptoms, consisted of informing and instructing the patients as well as enabling their participation. Personal consideration and the nurses' cognisance, knowledge, competence, solicitude, demeanour and statements of understanding were found to be important. Continuous health promotion nursing interventions were of considerable value for the majority of this group of cancer patients. Oncology nurses could reconfirm and update the care of head and neck cancer patients by including health promotion activities in individual care plans. By more frequent use of health promotion models, such as the empowerment model, the nurses could identify and focus on those individuals who needed to alter their life-style as well as tailor their approach towards these patient by setting goals for well-being and a healthy life-style.
PubMed ID
10889617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiovascular mortality focusing on socio-economic influence: the low-risk population of Halland compared to the population of Sweden as a whole.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71580
Source
Public Health. 2002 Sep;116(5):285-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
A. Baigi
B. Fridlund
B. Marklund
A. Odén
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care Halland, Falkenberg, Sweden. amir.baigi@lthalland.se
Source
Public Health. 2002 Sep;116(5):285-8
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Catchment Area (Health) - statistics & numerical data
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupations
Poisson Distribution
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and socio-economic status (SES) in Sweden and to estimate to what extent the difference between a province with low mortality and the rest of Sweden was dependent on socio-economic factors. A population-based retrospective study with a historical prospective approach was performed covering a 10-y period in the province of Halland, Sweden, as well as Sweden as a whole. Altogether 1,654,744 men and 1,592,467 women were included, of whom 45,394 men and 43,403 women were from Halland, distributed according to SES. Multivariate analysis with Poisson regression was used. Relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Both men and women with a low SES showed a significantly higher risk of death from CVD in Sweden as a whole. The risk was 23% higher for male blue-collar workers and 44% higher for female blue-collar workers when compared to their white-collar counterparts. The level of mortality in Halland was 14% lower compared to the country as a whole when only age was taken into account. When the socio-economic variable was also included, this figure was 8%. The results show the substantial significance of social differences with respect to CVD mortality. The effect of SES seems to be more important than that of geographical conditions when the latter are isolated from socio-economic influence.
PubMed ID
12209404 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decisive situations influencing spouses' support of patients with heart failure: a critical incident technique analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31929
Source
Heart Lung. 2001 Sep-Oct;30(5):341-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Mårtensson
K. Dracup
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
Heart Lung. 2001 Sep-Oct;30(5):341-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Decision Making
Educational Status
Emotions
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - classification
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Social Support
Spouses - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe decisive situations experienced by spouses of patients with heart failure that could potentially affect their ability to provide social support to the patient. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive design with a critical incident technique was used. Twenty-three informants, 15 women and 8 men, who were spouses of patients with severe heart failure were strategically chosen to ensure maximal variation in sociodemographic data and experiences as a spouse. RESULTS: Decisive situations influenced the experience of spouses of patients with heart failure in a manner that was either positive (involvement with others) or negative (feeling like an outsider). When spouses were given attention and treated like persons of value, they experienced involvement with others. In these cases, spouses had someone to turn to and were included in the physical care. In contrast, when spouses were kept at a distance by the patient, were socially isolated, and received insufficient support from children, friends, and health care professionals, they experienced feeling like an outsider. CONCLUSIONS: By identifying spouses' experiences, health care professionals can assess which kind of specific interventions should be used to improve the life situation of the patient with heart failure and his or her spouse.
PubMed ID
11604976 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determination of perceived health among elderly coronary patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55187
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1992;6(3):187-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992

Do physically active people cope better with biopsychosocial stress after a myocardial infarction?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50360
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1988;2(4):179-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
I. Karlsson
B. Fridlund
L. Hellström
A. Eliasson
C. Ekerving
L. Andersson
P A Larsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1988;2(4):179-83
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Exertion
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Abstract
A preliminary study of the relationship between a physically active versus a physically non-active life before a myocardial infarction and coping ability (e.g. psychosocial effects) after a myocardial infarction has been performed. In a mainly rural area in south-western Sweden all myocardial infarction sufferers (N = 49) during January 1984-August 1986, fulfilling certain criteria, were sent a questionnaire with special emphasis on their present and former exercise habits and psychosocial situation. The results indicate that there is a positive relation between a physically active as compared with a physically non-active life and coping ability in terms of fewer expressed depressions, better experienced relations in the family and higher degree of return to work, after a myocardial infarction among the physically active. However, further investigations are needed in order to explain the mechanisms involved. The results further imply that primary and secondary prevention must support the "risk-individual's" coping ability from a multifactorial view, built on holistic caring.
PubMed ID
3241908 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of an educational programme for the early detection of cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18177
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Jul;37(3):231-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
J. Månsson
B. Marklund
C. Bengtsson
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Unit, Primary Health Care, County Council Halland, Box 113, S-311 22 Falkenberg, Sweden. huslakarna.kungsbacka@swipnet.se
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Jul;37(3):231-42
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Education - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - methods - psychology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Avoiding patient's and doctor's delay is important for the detection of cancer. In order to study the possibilities for shortening the delay, without causing anxiety, an educational programme for early detection of cancer (EPEDC) was worked out, aimed to be evaluated at the community level. A community with 77,100 inhabitants, was informed about cancer symptoms in a letter. Participants who observed the cancer symptoms, described in the letter, were invited to visit the health centres, where they were interviewed and examined according to a specially designed schedule. Guidelines for taking care of these participants were also worked out. Fifteen previously unknown cancers were detected. By means of a telephone interview and a questionnaire the reactions to the EPEDC were studied. The results indicate that it is possible to inform and educate the population about cancer symptoms without causing anxiety on condition that there is an organisation which can be contacted without delay by subjects with potential cancer symptoms.
PubMed ID
14528549 View in PubMed
Less detail

34 records – page 1 of 4.