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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Air pollution from traffic at the residence of children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19980
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2001
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
B L Thomsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen 0, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Date
Mar-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
The hypothesis that exposure to traffic-related air pollution increases the risk of developing cancer during childhood was investigated. The authors enrolled 1,989 children reported to the Danish Cancer Registry with a diagnosis of leukemia, tumor of the central nervous system, or malignant lymphoma during 1968-1991 and 5,506 control children selected at random from the entire childhood population. The residential histories of the children were traced from 9 months before birth until the time of diagnosis of the cases and a similar period for the controls. For each of the 18,440 identified addresses, information on traffic and the configuration of streets and buildings was collected. Average concentrations of benzene and nitrogen dioxide (indicators of traffic-related air pollution) were calculated for the relevant period, and exposures to air pollution during pregnancy and during childhood were calculated separately. The risks of leukemia, central nervous system tumors, and all selected cancers combined were not linked to exposure to benzene or nitrogen dioxide during either period. The risk of lymphomas increased by 25% (p for trend = 0.06) and 51% (p for trend = 0.05) for a doubling of the concentration of benzene and nitrogen dioxide, respectively, during the pregnancy. The association was restricted to Hodgkin's disease.
PubMed ID
11226975 View in PubMed
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Ambient air levels and the exposure of children to benzene, toluene, and xylenes in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34102
Source
Environ Res. 1997 Nov;75(2):149-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
C. Lohse
B L Thomsen
H. Skov
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Environ Res. 1997 Nov;75(2):149-59
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Benzene - analysis - toxicity
Child
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Environmental health
Female
Humans
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Health
Toluene - analysis - toxicity
Urban health
Xylenes - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
The aims of the study were to evaluate if the front-door concentrations of benzene, toluene, and xylenes can be used to classify the personal exposures of Danish children and to identify factors that affect their personal exposure. Average concentrations were measured over 1 week with diffusive samplers, and the personal exposures of 98 children and the concentrations outside the front doors of their homes were measured simultaneously. Time and activity patterns were noted in diaries. The front-door concentrations were significantly higher in Copenhagen than in rural areas (all P
PubMed ID
9417846 View in PubMed
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Analysis of the treatment effect on recurrent bleeding and death in patients with cirrhosis and esophageal varices: multistage competing-risks model compared to conventional methods. The Copenhagen Esophageal Varices Sclerotherapy Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206043
Source
J Hepatol. 1998 Jan;28(1):107-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
B L Thomsen
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Hepatol. 1998 Jan;28(1):107-14
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Esophageal and Gastric Varices - mortality - physiopathology - therapy
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis - complications - mortality
Models, Statistical
Recurrence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sclerotherapy
Time Factors
Abstract
Multiple recurrences of bleeding with high mortality in cirrhosis with esophageal varices have been inadequately analyzed in previous trials. We propose analysis by the multistage competing-risks model, specifying the effect on overall mortality as an effect on mortality during bleeding, rate of cessation of bleeding, mortality rate without bleeding, and rate of rebleeding.
The Copenhagen Esophageal Varices Project enrolled patients after first bleeding and randomized 94 to usual treatment and 93 to sclerotherapy as supplement. During 9-52 months of follow-up, rebleeding occurred in 49 and 42, and death in 68 and 60 patients, respectively. The proportional hazards regression model (Cox model) was used for reanalysis both by the multistage competing-risks model and by conventional analysis for overall mortality and rate of first rebleeding. In the multistage model, time zero was at entry to any new disease stage, of which the first four were analyzed - two bleeding stages and two bleeding-free stages.
The conventional analysis showed a reduction of overall mortality rate in the sclerotherapy group of borderline significance, but no effect on rate of rebleeding. The multistage model indicated that sclerotherapy reduced the rate of rebleeding late in the disease course, and particularly after the first rebleeding. Rate of cessation of bleeding and mortality rates during bleeding and without bleeding were not affected by sclerotherapy.
Conventional analysis may give misleading conclusions, which might be avoided by applying the multistage model. The effect of sclerotherapy on overall mortality may be ascribed entirely to the reduced rate of rebleeding.
PubMed ID
9537847 View in PubMed
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[Birth weight charts--straight lines]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59916
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Sep 11;151(37):2382-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-1989
Author
N J Secher
B L Thomsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Sep 11;151(37):2382-3
Date
Sep-11-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Denmark
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Reference Values
PubMed ID
2800009 View in PubMed
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Connective tissue disease after hip and knee implant surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14034
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2001;30(2):82-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Mellemkjaer
S. Friis
J K McLaughlin
B L Thomsen
K. Kjøller
C. Høgsted
J F Winther
W J Blot
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen. lene@cancer.dk
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2001;30(2):82-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Connective Tissue Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Knee Prosthesis
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - surgery
Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To increase the knowledge of the long-term effects of artificial hip and knee joint implants. METHODS: The study groups consisted of 24,636 patients with osteoarthritis who underwent hip implant surgery and 5,221 who received knee implants during 1977-89. The post-implant rate of hospitalization for connective tissue disease (CTD) was compared with the rate in the general population of Denmark and with that among osteoarthritis patients without implant surgery. RESULTS: The rates of hospitalization for CTD were higher than the background level among both hip and knee implant patients with osteoarthritis, whereas the comparison with non-implanted osteoarthritis patients revealed that the hospitalization rate for CTD was reduced after hip implant surgery, but increased after knee implant surgery. CONCLUSION: Since the materials used in hip and knee implants in Denmark are not substantially different, these results are unlikely to reflect an implant effect but rather the selection criteria of referral for implant surgery.
PubMed ID
11324794 View in PubMed
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The Copenhagen Cohort Study on Infant Nutrition and Growth: breast-milk intake, human milk macronutrient content, and influencing factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59409
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Mar;59(3):600-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
K F Michaelsen
P S Larsen
B L Thomsen
G. Samuelson
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Mar;59(3):600-11
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Body Weight
Breast Feeding
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark
Family
Female
Growth
Humans
Infant Food
Infant Nutrition
Infant, Newborn
Lipids - analysis
Male
Milk Proteins - analysis
Milk, human - chemistry
Mothers
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urea - blood
Weaning
Abstract
In 91 healthy term infants breast-milk intake was measured at 2, 4, and 9 mo by test weighing and human milk macronutrient content by infrared analysis every 2-4 wk. In infants exclusively breast-fed, mean milk intake was 781 and 855 mL/24 h at 2 and 4 mo, respectively, and correlated positively with the current weight of the infant and negatively with the amount of formula supplement given at the maternity ward. Median daily energy intake was considerably below current recommendations (423 and 381 kJ/kg body wt at 2 and 4 mo, respectively). Protein concentration in the milk was approximately 8% higher in primipara. Median daily protein intake was 1.3 and 1.0 g/kg body wt at 2 and 4 mo, respectively. Median fat concentration was 39.2 g/L and was positively associated with pregnancy weight gain. This supports the hypothesis that maternal fat stores laid down during pregnancy are easier to mobilize during lactation than are other fat stores and, if low, may limit milk fat when exhausted.
PubMed ID
8116536 View in PubMed
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The Copenhagen cohort study on infant nutrition and growth: duration of breast feeding and influencing factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59395
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Jun;83(6):565-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
K F Michaelsen
P S Larsen
B L Thomsen
G. Samuelson
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1994 Jun;83(6):565-71
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Child Development
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Educational Status
Female
Growth
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
Duration of breast feeding was studied in 249 randomly chosen, healthy, term infants of Danish origin of which 80.7% participated. Breast feeding was initiated by 99.5% of the mothers. At 3, 6 and 9 months, 71%, 52% and 33%, respectively, were still breast feeding. Only 1 infant (0.5%) was exclusively breast fed beyond 7 months of age. In a Cox multiple regression analysis of factors influencing duration of breast feeding, we found a positive association with maternal education (p or = 12 years) were still breast feeding, compared to 29% with a low school education (
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 1995 May;84(5):465-77633136
PubMed ID
7919750 View in PubMed
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Cystic fibrosis in Denmark 1945 to 1985. An analysis of incidence, mortality and influence of centralized treatment on survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38358
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1988 Nov;77(6):836-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988
Author
O H Nielsen
B L Thomsen
A. Green
P K Andersen
M. Hauge
P O Schiøtz
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Gastroenterology C, Herlev Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1988 Nov;77(6):836-41
Date
Nov-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cystic Fibrosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Denmark
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Infant
Male
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The entire population of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in Denmark diagnosed in the period January 1, 1945, to June 30, 1985, comprised 514 persons of whom 62 were diagnosed at autopsy. Of the remaining 452 patients, 372 were probands and 80 were secondary cases. The effect of a centralized treatment on the prognosis was evaluated using a Cox's regression model. Furthermore an incidence analysis was performed using probands including autopsies. Centralized treatment had a significantly beneficial effect on the prognosis (p = 0.02), the death intensity (hazard rate) being decreased by a factor of 0.60. It was calculated that at present 1 out of 4,760 newborn Danes may be diagnosed as suffering from CF before the age of 15 years, and 3% of the Danish population are heterozygotes for CF.
PubMed ID
3264656 View in PubMed
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Development of the obesity epidemic in Denmark: cohort, time and age effects among boys born 1930-1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33200
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1999 Jul;23(7):693-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
B L Thomsen
C T Ekstrøm
T I Sørensen
Author Affiliation
The Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1999 Jul;23(7):693-701
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: A global epidemic of obesity is developing, but its causes are still unclear. In Denmark, two periods of steep increases in prevalence of obesity have occurred among young men born in the 1940s and 1960-70s. This study investigated the preceding changes in prevalence of obesity and in the entire body mass index (BMI = weight/height2) distribution by birth cohort, calendar time and age among Danish school boys. METHODS: Children attending Copenhagen schools 1937-1983 had annual health examinations, from which we computerized 1,037,468 measurements of height (m) and weight (kg) of 161,314 boys aged 7-13 y. Obesity was defined as age-specific BMI exceeding the 95.0, the 99.0 and the 99.9 percentile among those born 1930-1934, the latter corresponding to the prevalence of obesity among the young men in these cohorts. The median, standard deviation, skewness, and the 5th, 25th, 75th and 95th percentiles of the age-specific BMI were estimated for each birth cohort. RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity, defined by the 99.9 percentile, increased at all ages during the same birth years as among the young men, and, accordingly, at earlier calendar years. The prevalence of obesity, defined by the 95.0 percentile, showed a distinctly different pattern: a sharp increase, irrespective of age, during the calendar years 1947-1949, and thereafter a stable level until the 1970s, where a further modest increase began. The prevalence defined by the 99.0 percentile showed a mixture of the trends in those defined by the 99.9 and 95.0 percentiles. The median BMI showed small fluctuations, parallel at all ages. The standard deviation and right-sided skewness increased until birth year 1950, but were almost stable thereafter. The pattern of changes in the quartiles mostly reflected those in the median. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of obesity defined by the 99.9 or 99.0 percentile has increased in Danish boys born in the 1940s and since the mid 1960s, without corresponding changes in the central part of the BMI distribution. When defining obesity by the 95.0 percentile, there was a sharp distinct age-independent increase in the late 1940s. The development of the obesity epidemic is a heterogeneous phenomenon that has involved changes in environmental influences starting at preschool ages and affecting different subsets of the population, either because of selective exposure or particular susceptibility.
PubMed ID
10454102 View in PubMed
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Does the association between smoking status and selected healthy foods depend on gender? A population-based study of 54 417 middle-aged Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19306
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
M. Osler
A. Tjønneland
M. Suntum
B L Thomsen
C. Stripp
M. Grønbaek
K. Overvad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2002 Jan;56(1):57-63
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - analysis
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits - drug effects
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Smoking serves different functions for men and women. Thus, we wanted to investigate the association between smoking behaviour and intakes of selected healthy foods in men and women with special focus on differences and similarities between the two genders. DESIGN: In 1993-1997, a random sample of 80 996 men and 79 729 women aged 50-64 y was invited to participate in the study 'Diet, Cancer and Health'. In all, 27 179 men and 29 876 women attended a health examination and completed a 192-item food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The association between smoking status and low, median and high intakes of selected foods was examined among 25 821 men and 28 596 women. SETTING: The greater Copenhagen and Aarhus area, Denmark. RESULTS: For both men and women, smoking status group was associated with diet, such that increasing level of smoking status ranging from never smokers over ex-smokers to currently heavy smokers was associated with a lower intake of the healthy foods: fresh fruit, cooked vegetables, raw vegetables/salad, and olive oil. For wine, increasing level of smoking status category was associated with a higher fraction of abstainers and heavy drinkers. The difference between the extreme smoking status categories was larger than the difference between men and women within smoking status categories such that never smoking men in general had a higher intake of healthy foods than heavy smoking women. Correction for age, educational level, and body mass index (BMI) did not affect the results. CONCLUSION: In this middle-aged population, intake of healthy foods were associated with smoking behaviour with a dose-response type of relationship. The overall pattern was similar for men and women.
PubMed ID
11840181 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.