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8 records – page 1 of 1.

[Adolescent health habits and risk behavior. Intensive concentration of the municipalities for better health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73388
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Feb 24;90(8):710-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1993

[Do teenagers need play therapy? Great need of teenage-oriented hospital care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73254
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Dec 8;90(49):4446-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-1993
Author
K B Kelly
C. Bergh
B M Andersson
L. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Samtliga vid Ostra sjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Dec 8;90(49):4446-9
Date
Dec-8-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adolescent, Hospitalized
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Play Therapy
Sweden
PubMed ID
8271888 View in PubMed
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[Public health research is a medical issue!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202495
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Mar 17;96(11):1288-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-17-1999
Author
K B Kelly
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Mar 17;96(11):1288-9
Date
Mar-17-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Preventive Medicine
Public Health
Research
Research Support as Topic
Sweden
PubMed ID
10194902 View in PubMed
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[School health services--are they enough for today's society?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33093
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Sep 29;96(39):4162, 4165-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-29-1999
Author
K B Kelly
Author Affiliation
Ungdomssjukhus, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Sep 29;96(39):4162, 4165-6
Date
Sep-29-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services
Child
Child Health Services
Health promotion
Humans
Preventive Health Services
School Health Services
Sweden
PubMed ID
10544577 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tests of size and growth effects on Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) otolith d18 O and d13 C values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303014
Source
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2018 Sep 15; 32(17):1557-1564
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-15-2018
Author
J Burbank
B Kelly
J Nilsson
M Power
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, ON, Canada, N2L 3G1.
Source
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2018 Sep 15; 32(17):1557-1564
Date
Sep-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Carbon Isotopes - analysis - metabolism
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Otolithic Membrane - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Oxygen Isotopes - analysis - metabolism
Trout - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Otolith d18 O and d13 C values have been used extensively to reconstruct thermal and diet histories. Researchers have suggested that individual growth rate and size may have an effect on otolith isotope ratios and subsequently confound otolith-based thermal and diet reconstructions. As few explicit tests of the effect on fish in freshwater environments exist, here we determine experimentally the potential for related growth rate and size effects on otolith d18 O and d13 C values.
Fifty Arctic charr were raised in identical conditions for two years after which their otoliths were removed and analyzed for their d18 O and d13 C values. The potential effects of final length and the Thermal Growth Coefficient (TGC) on otolith isotope ratios were tested using correlation and regression analysis to determine if significant effects were present and to quantify effects when present.
The analyses indicated that TGC and size had significant and similar positive non-linear relationships with d13 C values and explained 35% and 42% of the variability, respectively. Conversely, both TGC and size were found to have no significant correlation with otolith d18 O values. There was no significant correlation between d18 O and d13 C values.
The investigation indicated the presence of linked growth rate and size effects on otolith d13 C values, the nature of which requires further study. Otolith d18 O values were unaffected by individual growth rate and size, confirming the applicability of these values to thermal reconstructions of fish habitat.
PubMed ID
29874707 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tests of size and growth effects on Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) otolith d18 O and d13 C values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292162
Source
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2018 Jun 06; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-06-2018
Author
J Burbank
B Kelly
J Nilsson
M Power
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., West Waterloo, ON, Canada, N2L 3G1.
Source
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2018 Jun 06; :
Date
Jun-06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Otolith d18 O and d13 C values have been used extensively to reconstruct thermal and diet histories. Researchers have suggested that individual growth rate and size may have an effect on otolith isotope ratios and subsequently confound otolith based thermal and diet reconstructions. As few explicit tests of the effect of fish in freshwater environments exist, here we determine experimentally the potential for related growth rate and size effects on otolith d18 O and d13 C values.
Fifty Arctic charr were raised in identical conditions for two years after which their otoliths were removed and analyzed for their d18 O and d13 C values. The potential effects of final length and the Thermal Growth Coefficient (TGC) on otolith isotope ratios were tested using correlation and regression analysis to determine if significant effects were present and to quantify effects when present.
The analyses indicated that TGC and size had significant and similar positive non-linear relationships with d13 C values and explained 35% and 42% of the variability, respectively. Conversely, both TGC and size were found to have no significant correlation with otolith d18 O values. There was no significant correlation between d18 O and d13 C values.
The investigation indicated the presence of linked growth rate and size effects on otolith d13 C values, the nature of which requires further study. Otolith d18 O values were unaffected by individual growth rate and size, confirming the applicability of applying these values to thermal reconstructions of fish habitat.
PubMed ID
29874707 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tests of size and growth effects on Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) otolith d18 O and d13 C values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303197
Source
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2018 Sep 15; 32(17):1557-1564
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-15-2018
Author
J Burbank
B Kelly
J Nilsson
M Power
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. West, Waterloo, ON, Canada, N2L 3G1.
Source
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2018 Sep 15; 32(17):1557-1564
Date
Sep-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Carbon Isotopes - analysis - metabolism
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Otolithic Membrane - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Oxygen Isotopes - analysis - metabolism
Trout - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Otolith d18 O and d13 C values have been used extensively to reconstruct thermal and diet histories. Researchers have suggested that individual growth rate and size may have an effect on otolith isotope ratios and subsequently confound otolith-based thermal and diet reconstructions. As few explicit tests of the effect on fish in freshwater environments exist, here we determine experimentally the potential for related growth rate and size effects on otolith d18 O and d13 C values.
Fifty Arctic charr were raised in identical conditions for two years after which their otoliths were removed and analyzed for their d18 O and d13 C values. The potential effects of final length and the Thermal Growth Coefficient (TGC) on otolith isotope ratios were tested using correlation and regression analysis to determine if significant effects were present and to quantify effects when present.
The analyses indicated that TGC and size had significant and similar positive non-linear relationships with d13 C values and explained 35% and 42% of the variability, respectively. Conversely, both TGC and size were found to have no significant correlation with otolith d18 O values. There was no significant correlation between d18 O and d13 C values.
The investigation indicated the presence of linked growth rate and size effects on otolith d13 C values, the nature of which requires further study. Otolith d18 O values were unaffected by individual growth rate and size, confirming the applicability of these values to thermal reconstructions of fish habitat.
PubMed ID
29874707 View in PubMed
Less detail

The use of biomarkers in the prediction of survival in patients with pulmonary carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229197
Source
Cancer. 1990 May 1;65(9):2033-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-1990
Author
W. Walop
M. Chrétien
N C Colman
R S Fraser
F. Gilbert
R S Hidvegi
T. Hutchinson
B. Kelly
M. Lis
W O Spitzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Cancer. 1990 May 1;65(9):2033-46
Date
May-1-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - blood - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Carcinoma, Small Cell - blood - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - blood - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Lung Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - blood
Abstract
Data on ten variables and 16 biomarkers were obtained on 119 patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary cancer. The prognostic value of 16 biomarkers (alpha-1-antitrypsin [AAT], adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA], human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG], immune complexes, immunoglobulins, N-terminal peptide of proopiomelanocortin [NTERM], and tumor-associated antibody [TAA]) was tested by adding these to the model of age, gender, stage, morphology, Feinstein's classification of symptoms, Karnofsky scale, leukocyte count, recent weight loss, and liver enzymes. Using Cox's regression method and a forward stepwise procedure, seven biomarkers (ACTH, AAT, AFP, calcitonin, HCG, TAA, and prolactin) entered the model. Elevated levels of cortisol and TAA were associated with longer survival. The selection of biomarkers by stepwise regression needs to be interpreted with caution, especially since the Z scores were found to be dependent on the particular variables included in the model. Furthermore, when dichotomized on maximum of the normal laboratory values, HCG and AFP were infrequently (2%) elevated. The lack of correlation among the biomarkers supports the hypothesis of random derepression of the genome of cancer cells. Further studies in improved modeling and the formulation of a biomarker index could enhance our understanding of the biology of cancer.
PubMed ID
2164876 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.